Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I’ve just spotted this on BBC4 at 9.00pm tonight.
‘Comments from Paddy Moloney, Christy Moore, Ronnie Drew etc
but also reels of unique footage covering more than 60 years.’

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

man… sometimes i wish i had digital telly.
or any telly for that matter!

someone should youtube this asap.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Hey, DubChieftain, I think you’ve genuinely coined a new phrase: "to YouTube". I’ve never heard anyone using it like this, as a verb - similar to "googling" something.

Maybe a member of "the session" has spawned a brand new phrase!

Just remember, you saw it here first…

Mark

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Anybody here just watch the folk hibernia show? I missed it. In work. Was there a man speaking on the show called Joe Kennedy?

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I thought this was a very good programme for the first hour, then i kinda lost interest, some great old clips though!

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Yeah it was good. Nice coverage of the recent history of trad music in Ireland. Some nice footage of the Dubs, Planxty, Christy, Bothies, Pogues, PJ & Martin Hayes. Nothing in particular I can think of that I haven’t seen in other similar documentaries, but good viewing. Made a change from having to look at that horrid slag Goodey and her cronies, which I’ve of late found myself watching, I shamefully admit.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I missed the beginning because I forgot it was on and only found it when channel hopping in the ad break. I enjoyed a lot of the clips but it was irritating that just when I was getting into a tune or a song they faded it out and talked all over it, particularly the last tune going into the credits. I also thought it was a shame that they played the theme from Harry’s Game when talking about Clannad, rather than something earlier like Dulaman. More Sharon Shannon would have been nice too. (Rant over!) Good programme on the whole!

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I wasn’t in to see it, but I’ve just got back from another cracker of a session at The Plume (where were ye, Ben and David?) to discover that my SO has recorded it and, what’s more, she tells me she let the tape continue to catch a re-run of The Avengers for me.

….I’ve just gone into the lounge (at 1am) to find the recorder is still on and is now recording a repeat of Folk Hibernia which apparently started at 12.20am. Very thoughtful of the Beeb to think about people who could be out at sessions and would like to see a repeat when they get back home!

I’ll watch it (and The Avengers, of course) over the weekend.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Busy tonight Trevor. I’ll be back in Bristol some time, though …

Off to bed now. Night night.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I bought something called a digital box at Christmas, and this is the first time I availed of it, catching the showing at 12.20am.

I was born in 1953, so lived through all this. The Dubliners revitalised old songs, introduced tunes to people, and more importantly, made tunes and these songs "Trendy".
The Chieftains then "invented" ITM, opening it up to the masses, although they still dressed in Sunday suits.
Planxty made it part of the "young and trendy" scene, and at the end of the day consisted of one melody player, and three backers. The Bothies took it from there, with more tunes, less songs, and instrumentalists like Keenan, Burke, Glackin, Molloy.
Horslips introduced the ITM sound to a whole new audience, namely rockers. The Pogues were missionaries again when they tied in to the punk scene.
"Woman’s Heart" kept Irish music to the forefront, and just incase it died out in a mainstream way, along came a cash cow in the form of "Riverdance". Despite condemnation from "snobs" and those who jump on the bandwagon because it is trendy to rubbish "Riverdance", for any one my age, watching Irish dancers for years, the show was AMAZING. That first glance on "Eurovision" night was as memorable as the fake moon landing in 1969.
And to remind us of the "real" music and its natural humble setting, what better way to end than Martin Hayes playing majestically.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

And KML, you disappoint me. I finally saw Jade Whatever tonight for thirty seconds, because I am driving everyone at work mad by saying things like "Jane Who?" and "What is Borat?". So I attempted to keep up. After 30 seconds I was hoping that global warming couled speed up and the world would end.
KLM, hang your head in shame.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I missed the first part but enjoyed what I saw.
It’s repeated on Sunday 21st @ 01:35 - 03:05
As a Bouzouki/Cittern player I loved the quip by Johnny Moynihan saying that if you search the Internet he is listed as "The man who brought the Bouzouki to Irish Music" now he says he can’t listen to ITM without having some @*#+*% playing the Bouzouki !!!

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Mea Culpa
Mea Culpa
Mea Culpa

Glad she’s out of there now right enough. Let’s see how the other tw@ts go on without her………….



(joking)

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

UKCITTERN, I agree. It was worth watching for that Johnny Moynihan quote alone. I was literally ROFLMAO.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Healthy skepticism anyone? ~ Some good photos and quotes, but ‘Folk’ fits, as does the use of ‘Hibernia’ ~ considering it is a particular vein and various aspects of the commercially lead rise and distribution of things ‘Folky’, and lacking any critical perspective, more like a fan mag… Yes, I saw it, and I recorded it, and I’m going to view it again at my leisure, maybe with some popcorn and a pint of G & T… I love checking out family trees, but this is only a few branches and not all are healthy…

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

What was the tune PJ and Martin Hayes were playing over the credits at the end? I recognised it but cannot for the life of me remember what it is.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

I’ve just finished watching the recording. My "take" on it is that it was in large part an analysis of the way the relationship between Irish Music, the State, and the Catholic Church has developed/changed since complete Irish independence was achieved just after WW2. However, since I’m not really into politics I’ve doubtless misunderstood, or not fully appreciated the significance of, some parts of the documentary, so I won’t go further down that road.

We were told Irish folk music didn’t really make it outside Ireland until well into the ’50s, which explains why I, and many other non-Irish of my age-group were completely unaware of its existence during our formative years. (I’m trying to make up for it now!)

One marvellous little highlight early on in the documentary was that of a very old fiddle player with a home-made box fiddle. The few seconds of him playing it were enough to show that he was indeed an accomplished player, and then he asked the interviewing journalist if he’d like to play it. The interviewer said he would, and this was where I expected him to demonstrate that he could also play the fiddle. I was wrong. The old fiddler gave the interviewer the bow and asked him to hold it upright in front of him. The old man then held the fiddle against the bow so that the bow contacted the strings in the right place, with his right hand rotated the fiddle about its long axis so that the bow contacted different strings as needed, and with his left hand fingered different notes on the string so as to play the Irish Washerwoman - a tune which many fiddlers find difficult enough when playing normally, let alone in that virtuoso manner with someone else holding a stationary bow!

Another early part of the documentary showed what appeared to be a Comhaltas fiddle audition in the early days, perhaps for the Fleadh. Turn the sound down and you’d swear that the fiddle player in front of the adjudicators looked just like a classical violinist playing a classical violin piece, such was the way he was playing and his general demeanour. I think the point was being made that in those days Comhaltas, possibly under Government influence, was trying to impose a classical style of playing Irish folk music - holding fiddle and bow, intonation, and presentation.

It’s a pity that this documentary was available only on digital television, and so could only be seen by people with the right equipment, and then only in the UK (some non-digital BBC TV channels can be picked up easily in at least Belgium and Holland, for starters, and in some parts of Ireland). I think this documentary has enough musical and historical discussion in depth to merit an issue on DVD so that the rest of the world can see it.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Ah, but would the rest of the world be bovvered, Trevor?

And on that point, as well as that clip you mentioned and the Johnny Moynihan one, my favourite clip was that of Martin Hayes talking about Willie Clancy’s playing of slow airs, which went something like (paraphrasing)
‘he had nothing to lose….no-one cared about the music….he was playing for himself…no theme album to make, to go on tour with, so he was playing for himelf and his playing was pure and majestic…’ …..anyway, something like that, check it out.
So who cares if the rest of the world is bothered? Maybe a message we should all remember. Also the point he was making makes MaxF’s thinking about guitar accompaniment clearer to me. (Not wishing to start *that* up again, but I think I know where Max is coming from now.)

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

where were the wolfetones ?
46 years in business is something to recognise

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

…In the business of appealing to the lowest common denominator. I thought it was meant to be about folk culture not recognising those who promote death and bloodshed. They don’t fall within my definition of traditional. But that’s maybe just me.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

The Wolfe Tones had to decommission, as there is nobody getting killed at the moment to write songs about, and make loads of money from, while promoting hatred.

The Tones are not a musical group, and never were.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

Thanks bliss. I thought for a bit I was a lone voice crying in the wilderness.

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

This is just from memory, but I think the Martin Hayes tunes at the end were Rolling in the Barrel and Morning Dew/

Re: Folk Hibernia tonight BBC4

With regard to the bouzouki it is interesting to remember that Rory and Alex MacEwan were using one in the late Fifties.