Hornpipes

Hornpipes

I’ve realized the list of tunes I know is quite short of hornpipes. Any suggestions for good, haunting, interesting hornpipes worthwhile to learn?

Re: Hornpipes

The list is endless, but for a couple of recordings to inspire you ~

"Seamus Creagh: Tunes for Practice" ~ without the dots
http://www.thesession.org/recordings/display/3225

"Matt Cranitch (& friends): Ceolta Seisiún Na HÉireann / Irish Session Tunes: The Red Book"
http://www.thesession.org/recordings/display/4137 ~ with dots

But, what’s your instrument. We bunch of scallywags here could always recommend some good recordings of hornpipes through your instrument of choice too…

& just starting what would eventually rise up here ~ best learned from living sources or recordings rather than merely by name or scrawl (dots)…

Not forgetting regional ~ Irish, Scottish, North American, Northumberland - - - etc…

Cape Breton, Newfoundland, English - - - ;-)

Re: Hornpipes

Thanks for the links, great tunes. I play mainly trad on an 1890s parlor guitar, which is good for fingerpicking the melody while playing rhythm with my thumb. Yes, any good recordings folks know of are always as useful, if not more, than the dots.
Any hornpipes from anywhere will suffice, long as they’re powerful tunes; not too diddly.

Re: Hornpipes

The words haunting and hornpipes are not two words I remember seeing in the same sentence before…

Re: Hornpipes

Caislean an Oir is an eloquent tune that I thought fit the haunting description when played by Kevin Burke on If the Cap Fits. Frailach is another good one, just looking for more of that sort…

Re: Hornpipes

I like this one..Frank Roches Favourite..
http://www.thesession.org/tunes/203
Sometimes listed as a Hornpipe and sometimes as a Strathspey..
Those triplets will surely give the fingers a workout. :-) ..
The 1890’s Parlour Guitar sounds like a nice thing …

Re: Hornpipes

Little Stack of Wheat. Learn it by ear from the Irvine/Brady album.

Re: Hornpipes

Though, come to think of it, I seem to remember they play it in a funny key to fit the singing that precedes the tune. It’s in G I reckon.

Re: Hornpipes

From the comments section of The Home Ruler —
"Matt Molloy renders a haunting, slow-tempo version…"
Thanks Nick, I hadn’t heard this one before.

Posted by .

Re: Hornpipes

The Boys of Ballycastle whose A part has a nice minor feel is one that Kevin Burke does well and I’m playing The Factory Smoke a lot at present.

Re: Hornpipes

Thanks all for the tunes, quite helpful!

Re: Hornpipes

Matt Molloy recorded a tune called the City of Savannah, it comes from the 1880s book Ryan’s Mammoth Collection. There are another couple of tunes in there, La Petrie’s and the Post Horn, which have a similar structure; I always play ‘em together.
These are virtuostic tunes, you might say; they go up to the top of the 2nd octave. On a flute that’s no problem, other instruments require a bit of practice. There are other showy hornpipes of that ilk in Ryan’s; the American Rifle Team, On the Road, the Golden Wedding. These definitely qualify as "interesting," if you ask me.

Re: Hornpipes

For a "haunting" hornpipe, I can only think of the Martin Hayes version of the Peacock’s Feather. There was a YouTube clip of it, but the person who uploaded it has closed their account. :-(

Re: Hornpipes

Don’t forget the rest of the family of swung tunes ~

Barndances

Germans

& half hornpipes / single hornpipes 8-) ~ highland flings & strathspeys

& in 3/4 too ~ mazurkas / varsouviennes