Eibhlín A Rún waltz

Also known as Aileen Aroon, Allen A’Roon, Eibhlin A Ruin, Eibhlin A Run, Eileanóir Na Rún, Eileanoir Na Run, Eileen Aroon, Eilionóir A Rúin.

There are 11 recordings of a tune by this name.

Eibhlín A Rún has been added to 5 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Four settings

X: 1
T: Eibhlín A Rún
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
"_VB"(dB)|(A2B2)(dB)|(d2e2f2)|(F2A2ed)|B4(dB)|(A2B2)(dB)|(d2e2f2)|(F2A2Bd)|d4||
(df)|.g.g f2(fe)|.f.a a2(fe)|.d.d e2(dB)|A4f2|a2(fedB)|(de) f4|(F2A2)(Bd)|d4|]
ABC
X: 2
T: Eibhlín A Rún
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
"_VB"(A2B2c2)|(d3e f2)|(A2B2)(ce)|d6|(A2B2c2)|(d3e f2)|(A/2d/2) z(B/2d/2) z(c/2e/2) z|{e}d4||
(f2f2f2)|(g3B) B2|f2f2e2|(d3B) .A2|a2(ge)(dc)|(d3e f2)|(A/2d/2) z(B/2d/2) z(c/2e/2) z|{e}d4|]
ABC
X: 3
T: Eibhlín A Rún
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
(F2G2A2)|(B3cd2)|(F2G2)(Ac)|B6|(F2G2A2)|(B3cd2)|
(F/B/)z (G/B/)z (A/c/)z|{c}B2||d2d2d2|(e3G) G2|d2d2c2|
(B3G)F2|f2 (ec)(BA)|(B3cd2)|(F/B/)z (G/B/)z (A/c/)z|{c}B2||
ABC
X: 4
T: Eibhlín A Rún
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
DEF GAB | DEF G3 | DEF GAB | DEF G3
BBB cAA | BBA GED | dcB AGA | BDE FG2
ABC

One comment

Eibhlín A Rún

Can’t believe this wasn’t added (I searched for different spellings, didn’t see any!)

Many versions out there, beautiful song. These two arrangements are from O’Neill’s.

Here’s what fiddler’s companion has to say about it:

D Major (O’Neill): A Major (Flood). Standard. AB (O’Neill): AAB (Flood). One of the oldest tracable tunes in all fiddle literature and still current in the living tradition. Flood (1905) states that it was composed in 1386 by Carrol mor O’Daly {Cearbhall O Dalaigh} (d. 1405), a famous Irish minstrel harper described by old annalists as the ‘chief composer of Ireland, and Olair (Doctor) of the Country of Corcomroe,’ apparently on the authority of Hardiman. Bunting and Francis O’Neill (1913) give the harpers name not as Carol/Carrol/Carroll but Gerald O’Daly, and Bunting refers to him as a contemporary of Rory Dall O’Cahan, who died in 1653, though he thinks the melody much older and that O’Daly only adapted Irish words to it. Mrs. Mulligan Fox, in Annals of the Irish Harpers gives the 1405 date for the harper’s death, and Fitz Gerald speculates that, since the hero of the song says he would spend a cow to entertain his ladylove, that a date of 1450 would be consistent with a time when ‘living money’ was still in use. No matter what his first name, "O’Daly so captivated Eilleen (Eibhlin) Kavanagh of Polmonty Castle, Co. Carlow (near New Ross, Co. Wexford), that she eloped with him on the eve of her betrothal to a rival lover" (Flood, 1905, pg. 62). An erroneous legend has the song composed by Donogh mor O’Daly, of Finvarra, Cistercian Abbot of Boyle (d. 1244), who was called ‘the Ovid of Ireland,’ and another version of the song was apparently composed by a 17th poet, also named Cearbhall O Dallaigh. To complicate matters further, James E. Doan (Eigse, volume XVIII, part 1, 1980) concludes there were several poets of the name of Cearbhall O Dalaigh between the 13th and 17th centuries, and suggests that the versions which have survived to the present day in Irish literature and song are really a composite of features of all, a folk-process amalgum. O’Neill (1913) records that the highly romantic story of “Eibhlin a Ruin” and her elopement with Carroll O’Daly was derived from Galway harper Cormac Common’s (1703-c. 1790) repertory.
***
The melody was later admired by the German composer Handel during his stay in Ireland, according to Charles O’Conor of Belanagame (Flood, 1906). A note in Pepys’ diaries refers to one Joe Harris, an Irish actor in London, singing the song in Gaelic in a performance of Shakespeare’s Henry V: "Among other things, Harris, a man of fine conversation, sang his Irish song, the strangest in itself, and the prettiest sung by him that ever I heard" (Flood, 1906, pg. 72). It retained its popularity, being sung at the Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin, in the Christmas season of 1728 by Mrs. Sterling at the end of the opera The Way of the World, and again at that theatre in December 1743 by Mrs. Storer as an interlude during performances of Julius Ceasar. Charles Coffey included it in his 1728 ballad opera The Beggar’s Wedding, written after the success of John Gay’s Beggar’s Opera, and O’Sullivan and O’Neill both find this to be one of the earliest printed versions of the tune. A broadside without printer’s imprint and with different words than Coffey’s was published about 1740 under the title "Ailen Aroon, an Irish Ballad." See also note for "Robin Adair." Sources for notated versions: A MS from 1726 [Flood]; “Mrs. Lavin” [O’Neill]. Brysson (Curious Selection), c. 1790; pg. 20. Flood, 1905; pg. 62. Hime (Pocket Book), volume IV, 1810; pg. 16. Holden (Old Established Tunes), 1806-7; pg. 29. James Johnson (The McLean Collection), 1772 (Edinburgh); pgs. 28-29 (set by Charles McLean). Kinloch (100 Airs), Part I, c. 1815; No. 10. McFadden (Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs), volume V, 1790-1797; pg. 29. Mooney (History of Ireland), 1846; pg. 535. Murphy (Irish Airs and Jigs), 1809; pg. 27. O’Farrell (Music for the Union Pipes), 1797-1800; pg. 30. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion), 1801-10; pg. 20. O’Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1979; No. 392, pg. 68. Burke Thumoth (12 Scotch and Irish Airs), No. XIII, c. 1745-50. Walsh (Ceol ar Sinsear), Part V, 1920; pg. 18. Maggie’s Music MM220, Hesperus – “Celtic Roots.”