Mr Turner’s Academy Cotillion polka

Mr Turner's Academy Cotillion has been added to 1 tunebook.

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Two settings

X: 1
T: Mr Turner's Academy Cotillion
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: [D2B2g2] [D2B2g2] | d3 B | cA GF | G/F/G/A/ GG | [D2B2g2] [D2B2g2] | d3 B | cA GF | G2 G2 :|
|: cB cA | d>e dB cA GF | G/F/G/A/ GB | cB cA | d>e dB | cA GF | G2 G2 :|
|: DG DG | DG/A/ BB | DG DG | DG/A/ B2 :|
cB cA | d>e dB cA GF | G/F/G/A/ GB | cB cA | d>e dB | cA GF | G2 G2 ||
ABC
X: 2
T: Mr Turner's Academy Cotillion
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
X: 1
T: Mr Turner's Academy Cotillion
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:g2g2 | d3 B | cA FD | G/F/G/A/ BG |
g2g2 | d3 B | cA FD |1 G>A Bd :|2 G2 GB
|: c>d cA | d>e dB | cA FD | G/F/G/A/ BG |
c>d cA | d>e dB | cA FD |1 G2 GB :|2 G2 G2 |
|: DG DG | G/A/B/A/ BG | DG DG | G/A/B/A/ BG :|
c>d cA | d>e dB | cA FD | G/F/G/A/ BG |
c>d cA | d>e dB | cA FD |1 G2 GB :|2 G>A Bd ||
ABC

Nine comments

Mr Turner’s Academy Cotillion

A tune used for a Regency dance of the same name. It was played at a pub session at the Priddy (Somerset, England) Folk Festival the weekend before last.

For those musicians unable to play more than one note simultaneously, the significant note in the triad in bars one and five is the high “g”.

YouTube video here (Hampshire Regency Dancers at Clandon Park)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvItgHeD2EU


The Fiddler’s Companion doesn’t carry the ABC, but it does include these notes about it:

American, Cotillion Tune (2/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDCCD. Boston, circa 1783: "At intervals I would be in company with a genteel young man who lived with his parents next door to my lodgings. He was a pupil of Mr. Turnner, dancing master. He introducet me in to the school, where I would often go as a spectator or visiter. Mr. Turnner had a great number of scholars of both sexes and wouyld sometimes practice them all together when I would make sure to attend. I learned at once his method and the dances then in vogue. I saw the master’s boast lay principally in hornpipes, for he would have his best hornpipe dancer dress’d in a neat sailor’s dress. At a practice in the daytime my young friend was one of the hornpipe dancers. In return of friendship I taught him many steps and soon made him the best dancer in the school, by private lessons" (quoted in Morrison, from dancing master John Durang). Morrison (Twenty-Four Early American Country Dances, Cotillions & Reels, for the Year 1976), 1976; pg. 53. North Star Records NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village."

I learned setting #2 from Graham Brand, an anglo concertina player with whom I play regularly, whose core repertoire is Morris tunes. I think he learned it from the quirky Anglo-Canadian trio Duck Soup (featuring Dan Quinn on melodeon) http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/ducksou2.htm . I suspect the version we play has been filtered through the bellows of a few Morris musicians and, latterly, through my own blundering quasi-Irish mandolin and fiddle playing.

Listening that clip, the very ‘polite’ string quartet arrangement is, no doubt, fitting for the style of dancing, the setting, the period dress etc. but, at the risk of blowing my own trumpet, I think I prefer the way we play it.

Creadur: "I suspect the version we play has been filtered through the bellows of a few Morris musicians".

Your suspicions are correct!

The version that I posted (as led by a concertina player at the Priddy pub session) was taken from the Boston manuscript. (But played with a lot more drive than as played by the musicians in the Hampshire Regency dancers clip).

I should add that, despite appearances, setting #2 is still a 3-part tune. The repeat sign at the end of b.22 is an internal repeat within the 3rd part, which applies on both iterations of that part.

…Sorry Mix - I see you had already detailed the repeat structure in your comments.

@Creadur: Indeed, in reality a three-part tune - and that’s how I would have written it out.

But in this instance, I’ve kept to the original - My ABC transcription is from the MS.

I’ve just received the following correction from Graham Brand:

"I learnt this tune in around 1985 from David Kingcome, a fiddle player from Woking in Surrey. He was the main musician for the Corn Dollies, a ladies folk dance side in Reigate. Myself and some of my friends also played for the Corn Dollies at that time. I think David had an EFDSS and/or Playford background, which I assumed was where he got it from. My friend Bob Keeble also learnt this tune from David and taught it to Dan Quinn, Will Duke (and I think Reg Hall) at the sessions at Elsie’s (the Queens Arms) at Cowden Pound in Sussex. Hearing it again on the excellent Duck Soup CD (after all these years) prompted me to start playing it again. In his sleeve notes, Dan says that he learnt it from Bob Keeble, but Bob thinks he should have mentioned that we got it from David Kingcome originally."

Learned this tune from you two. Thanks.