Svensk Annas waltz

Also known as The Peek-a-boo, Svensk Anna’s, Swedish Anna’s.

There is 1 recording of a tune by this name.

Svensk Annas has been added to 8 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Three settings

X: 1
T: Svensk Annas
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
FG|A2 f2 e2|d2 c2 B2|A2 F3 G|A3 G FG|
A2 f2 e2|d2 c2 d2|e3 f e^d|e4 FG|
A2 f2 e2|d2 c2 B2|A2 F3 G|A3 A AA|
B2 g2 f2|e2 B2 c2|d3 e dc|d3 A:|
|:FG|A4 f2|A3 A A2|B4 g2|B3 B B2|
c3 d cB|E2 F2 G2|B2 A2 G2|F4 FG|
A4 f2|A3 A A2|B4 g2|B3 B B2|
c3 d cB|A2 f2 e2|d3 e dc|d4:|
ABC
X: 2
T: Svensk Annas
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
EF|G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 A2|G2 E2 A2|G4 G2|G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 c2|d6-|d2 z2 EF|
G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 A2|G2 E2 A2|G4 G2|A2 f2 e2|d2 A3 B|c6-|c2 z2 G2|
G2 G2 E2|G4 G2|AA A2 F2|A4 A2|G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 c2|d6-|d2 z2 EF|
G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 A2|GG E2 A2|G4 GG|A2 f2 e2|d2 A3 B|c6-c2 z2 z2||
G4 e2|G6|A4 f2|A6|B2 B2 B2|A4 A2|G2 ec GE|c'g ec GE|
G4 e2|G6|A4 f2|A6|B2 B2 f2|e4 d2|[1c6-|c2:|[2 c4 EG| C,4|]
ABC
X: 3
T: Svensk Annas
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
FG|A2 f2 e2|d2 c2 B2|A2 F2 B2|A4 FG|
A2 f2 e2|d2 c2 d2|e3 d ef|e4 FG|
A2 f2 e2|d2 c2 B2|A2 F2 B2|A4 A^A|
B2 g2 f2|e2 B2 c2|d3 c de|d4:|
|:FG|A3 z gz|A3 d cd|B3z gz|B6|
c3 d c2|B3 c B2|A2 F2 B2|A4 FG|
A3 z fz|A3 d cd|B3 z gz|B6|
c3 B A2|f2 c2 e2|d3 c de|d4:|]
ABC

Six comments

Svensk Annas vals /Peek-a-boo Waltz

Mix’s recent submission of "The Rope Waltz" brought back memories of Orkney waltz sets, and this one is often played up north along with The Stronsay Waltz and The Rope Waltz.
It’s history, however, is quite intriguing.
"Svensk Anna" (Swedish Anna) was not named due to her being Swedish (though she was), but it was due to the farm she belonged to (a “gårdsnamn” - farm name - used to distinguish one Nils or Anna from another - found in the Northern Isles of Scotland too, for example "Jimmy o’ the Bu", or " Maggie o’ Holm").
Svensk Anna Olsdotter (1892-1973) of Svenskgården ("The Swedish Farm"), by Boda village in Dalarna, played the cittra (chord zither) and apparently was quite a character. The tune, however, came to Boda from Anna’s mother (possibly an "Anna" too), who heard it played by a brass band in a seaside town in northern Sweden, where she was working as a "domestic".
Some people might recognise this tune as being very similar to an old time American waltz - the Peek-a-boo Waltz.
The "Peek-a-boo" is attributed to William J Scanlan (1856-1898), an Irish American from Springfield MA.
Scanlan was a composer and "theatrical" person and originally presented the tune as the melody to a song (in mixed metre) for his stage drama "Friend and Foe" in 1881. Two years after that, his publishers printed an arrangement (by L A Benjamin) of his song melody as part of a waltz medley entitled "Peek-a-boo Waltz".

The song has sentimental lyrics, somewhat typical of the day:

On a cold winter’s ev’ning when bus’ness is done,
And to your home you retire,
What a pleasure it is to have a bright, bouncing boy,
One whom you love to admire!
You hug him and kiss him. You press him to your heart.
What joy to your bosom ‘twill bring!
Then you place him on the carpet and you’ll hide behind the chair,
And to please him, you’ll commence to sing:

CHORUS:
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo! Come from behind the chair.
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo! I see you hiding there. Oh! You rascal!
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo! Come from behind the chair.
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo! I see you hiding there.


T:Peek-a-boo
C:Wm J Scanlan
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:C
EF|G2 ed c2 BA|G2 EA G2 z2|G2 ed c2 Bc|d4-d z EF|
G2 ed c2 BA|G2 EA G2 z2|A2 fe d2 AB|c4-c z z G|
G G2 E G G2 G|AF AF A3 A|G2 ed c2 Bc|d4-d z EF|
G2 ed c2 BA|GG EA G2 GG|A2 f2 ed AB|\
[M:3/4] c6-|c2 z2 z2||
|:G4 e2|G6|A4 f2|A6|B2 B2 B2|A4 A2|G6-|G2 z2 z2|
G4 e2|G6|A4 f2|A6|B2 B2 f2|e4 d2|\
[1c2 ^F2 G2|A4 G2:|[2c6-|c2 z2 z2|]

The waltz was also set in C, and a simplified version is here:

X:2
T:Peek-a-boo Waltz
C:Wm J Scanlan
M:3/4
R:Waltz
L:1/8
K:C
EF|G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 A2|G2 E2 A2|G4 G2|G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 c2|d6-|d2 z2 EF|
G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 A2|G2 E2 A2|G4 G2|A2 f2 e2|d2 A3 B|c6-|c2 z2 G2|
G2 G2 E2|G4 G2|AA A2 F2|A4 A2|G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 c2|d6-|d2 z2 EF|
G2 e2 d2|c2 B2 A2|GG E2 A2|G4 GG|A2 f2 e2|d2 A3 B|c6-c2 z2 z2||
G4 e2|G6|A4 f2|A6|B2 B2 B2|A4 A2|G2 ec GE|c’g ec GE|
G4 e2|G6|A4 f2|A6|B2 B2 f2|e4 d2|[1c6-|c2:|[2 c4 EG| C,4|]

I’ve also gleaned an old time setting from the "web".

Now, the question is, did Svensk Anna’s mother hear that brass band playing Scanlan’s "Peek-a-boo", and it was this American waltz that found its way to Boda? The dates tally.
It would be a reversal of the usual trend of "old world" tunes finding their way to the "new world".

I should add that Andrew Kunz suggests a similarity with the Peek-a-boo to Jularbo’s "Livet i Finnskogarna", but I think that is heading down the wrong road. Possibly someone confusing their "Scandinavian waltzes".

:-) Thanks!

Lovely to wake up to a couple of friends, this tune and yourself, with a good hand roasted strong coffee and a particularly nice bread toasted. I’ve also known this in several flavours. Once my eyes and mind are fully open and focused, if I’ve a different enough way with it I’ll add a transcription later. I was surprised it wasn’t already on site. It brought a welcome smile on this gray day. I also enjoyed your write-up, which is no surprise… ;-)

Misinformation or confusion wouldn’t be a first for dear Andrew, or any of us, bless him. He has an open ear and mind and welcomes any help in squaring things away, corrections included.

I look forward to some nice variations!

It does lend itself to tweaking.

Aaargh - I fell for the dreaded apostrophe trap - "its" not "it’s" for the possessive.
At least I avoided the apostrophe in the title. Swedes don’t go in for that kind of thing.

Nice tune - definitely one I need to learn .. :-)

- and indeed, those three waltzes do make a nice set.