Shoot The Donkey mazurka

Also known as Shoe The Donkey, Valse De Vieux Quebec, The Varsovienne.

There are 15 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with Sonny’s (a few times).

Shoot The Donkey has been added to 6 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Two settings

X: 1
T: Shoot The Donkey
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: G>A |B2 D2 G>A | B2 D2 G>A | B2 E2 D2 | A2 D2 F>G |
A2 D2 F>G | A2 D2 F>G | A2 e2 F2 | G4 :|
|: B>c |d2 g2 f2 | c2 E2 (3GAB | c2 e2 d2 | B2 D2 G>A |
B2 (3ABA G2 | c4 e>c | (3ded E2 F2 | G4 :|
ABC
X: 2
T: Shoot The Donkey
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: G>A |B2 D2 G>A | B2 D2 G>A | [D2B2] [E2A2] D2B2] | A2 [C2D2] F>G |
A2 [C2D2] F>G | A2 [C2D2] [CF]>G | A2 [F2c2e2] [C2F2] | [B,4G4] :|
|: B>c |d2 g2 f2 | c4 A>B | c2 e2 d2 | B4 G>A |
[D2B2] A2 B2 | c4 c>e | e2 E2 [C2A2] | [B,4G4] :|
ABC

Ten comments

“Shoe The Donkey” / “Shoot The Donkey”

Another varsovienne…

X: 2 “Shoe the Donkey” ~ Donegal

B: "Dances of Donegal", collected by Grace Orpen, D.M. Wilkie, London, 1931
The first few pages of this book, and its first tune & dance:
"The Fairy Dance" - http://thesession.org/tunes/424

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(page 26 - music notation & dance description - the first of six couple dances)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Shoe the Donkey (Couple Dance)
Music: any varsouvienne

Steps - - - - - - - - - Description - - - - - - - - - Bars

Partners hold in waltz grip and stand so that man’s left and woman’s right shoulders are in the line of direction. (LOD = ACW)

A. - - - Described for the woman, the man starts with the opposite foot.
Hop on left foot, raising right foot slightly.
Step on right foot in line of direction.
Step on left foot bringing feet together (3 beats).
Repeat this twice more, then step forward on righ foot, change direction by turning body and step on left foot with a stamp.
Repeat in the other direction, then repeat whole step once more. - - - 16
B. - - - Hop on left foot.
Step forward on right foot.
Step on left foot closing feet up.
Step forward on right foot then change direction and step on left foot with a stamp.
Repeat with the other foot.
This is repeated for the whole of B music played twice through, and the dancers travel round the room as they turn. - - - 16


<[ NOTES: There are also versions of the varsovienne where the couples turn instead of the usual back and forth many dancers may be familiar with. And, there are versions that combine the two, as well as others where a bit of waltzing might be included. ]>

“Shoe the Donkey” / “The Varsovienne”

I did think on it, but it was closer to another one rather than the Donegal one you’ve linked to, and they are quite different from one another. There are similarities rhythmically because they’re the same dance, the varsovienne, for which I’ve a lot of different tunes, and not just the few shared here and from all over the place. This one, at least in the B-part, is closer to this earlier entry:

# Added by Aidan Crossey - December 29th, 2003
http://thesession.org/tunes/2320

The same dance, but not quite the same melody… ;-)

Now, do I have Lisa playing it somewhere, maybe on an old cassette? I’ll have to go digging, fingers and toes crossed. :-)

Shoot the Donkey?

Ever the fearless Democrat?

:-D They shoot elephants don’t they? I have once in my life actually handled an old elephant gun ~ WHEW! I’ve also eaten horse steaks, well, actually, it was a jackass steak, just a step away from donkey, and it was very tasty too.

“Dances of Donegal” collected and edited by Grace Orpen, 1931 - ITMA digital copy

ITMA: Irish Traditional Music Archive/Taisce Cheol DÚchais Éireann
http://www.itma.ie/
Grace Orpen’s Local Donegal Dances, 1931
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/print-collection/donegal-dances-1931
"Dances of Donegal" collected and edited by Grace Orpen, 1931
Click on ‘32 Pages’ to view them, with Grace Orpen’s ‘Figures’/illustrations…
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/book/dances-of-donegal

She is indeed, one of my many heros of tradition… ;-) Many thanks for the link…