The Lark In The Morning jig

Also known as The Auld Lark In The Morning, Dominic Rooney’s, Dominick Rooney’s, Fuiseog Sa Mhaidin, Lark In The Morning, The Old Lark In The Morning, Seamus Ennis’ Lark In The Morning.

There are 149 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Frieze Breeches (a few times), Banish Misfortune (a few times), The Cliffs Of Moher (a few times).

The Lark In The Morning has been added to 321 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Five settings

X: 1
T: The Lark In The Morning
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
AFA AdB | AFA D3 | DFA gfe | fed edB |
AFA AdB | AFA D2f | gfe fed | edA B/c/dB :|
|:Adf ~a3 | abf ~a3 | Adf ~a2 f | gfe fdB |
Adf ~a3 | abf ~a2f | gfe fed | edA B/c/dB :|
ABC
X: 2
T: The Lark In The Morning
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
~A3 AdB | AFA D3 | AFA gfe | fdB BAF |
~A3 AdB | AFA D2 f | gfe fed | edB BdB :|
Adf ~a3 | abf a3 | Adf a2 f | gfe fdB |
Adf ~a3 | abf a2 f | gfe fed | edB BdB :|
ABC
X: 3
T: The Lark In The Morning
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
~A3 AdB|AFA D2 D|daf g{a}ge|fdB BAF|
~A3 AdB|AFA D2 f|g{a}ge fed|edB BAF:|
Adf ~a3|abf a2 z|Adf a2 f|gfe fdB|
Adf ~a3|abf a2 f|g{a}ge fed|edB BAF:|
# Added .
ABC
X: 4
T: The Lark In The Morning
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
~A3{c}AdB|~A3 D2{d}A|AFA f+slide+ge|fdB {d}BAF|
~A3{c}AdB|~A3 D2{d}A|gfe fed|edB BAF :|
Adf ~a3|abf afd|Adf agf|gfe fdB|
Adf ~a3|abf afd|fge fed|edB BAF :|
ABC
X: 5
T: The Lark In The Morning
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
A2 A AdB | AFA D2 D | AFA fge | fdB BAF |
~A3 AdB | AF/G/A DFA | gge fed | f/e/dB BAF |
A2 A AdB | AFA DD/D/D | AD/D/D fge | fdB BAF |
AAA AdB | AFA D2 f | gfe fed | edB BAF ||
Adf a2 f | abf afd | Adf aaf | gfe fdB |
Adf aaf | abf afd | gfe fed | edB BAF |
Adf aaf | abf afd | Ad/e/f aaf | gfe fdB |
Adf aaf | abf afd | g2 e fed | edB BAF |]
ABC

Twenty comments

I learnt this tune from West Clare pipes/whistle/flute player Michael Falsey in his whistle class at the Willie Clancy Week, Milltown Malbay. He referred to it as the ‘old’ version of The Lark in the Morning - it clearly corresponds to the first two parts of the common 4-part version. I have not heard it played by anyone other than Michael, myself and others who have been to his classes, so presumably it has not spread much beyond the West Clare pipers’ repertoire.

I was prompted to post this tune by Carrie’s request in Discussions for banjo tunes to enter in a fleadh. Although not a typical banjo tune, I felt that the simplicity of this tune would allow plenty of room for variation and expression - and would be a change form the better-known session tunes.

Seamus Ennis

This is close to the way that Seamus Ennis played it. Maybe you should have posted it as the "*Old* Lark In The Morning", as it really is a different tune.

David, I’ve heard this played before in Sydney - I don’t think its range is that limited.

Perhaps I should get out more.

Brad - I agree, it is quite a different tune. But there are plenty of duplicated names here already, so one more won’t hurt. Adding ‘Old’ to the title would constitute changing the name, and I am reluctant to give it any name other than that under which I learnt it.

Lark On The Strand?

I’m just reading it here without playing it, but it looks like a variant of the jig I know as The Lark on The Strand; esp. the B part. I think it’s on Dervish’s Midsummer’s Night CD? OK, I’ll shut up now ….. cat.

Different tune altogether, but there are certainly similarities in terms of rhythm and melody contour. Maybe they’d go well in a set together.

The Old Lark in the Morning

The version based on Paul Smyth’s flute playing:

K: Dmaj
~A3 AdB | AFA D3 | AFA gfe | fdB BAF |
~A3 AdB | AFA D2 f | gfe fed | edB BdB :|
Adf ~a3 | abf a3 | Adf a2 f | gfe fdB |
Adf ~a3 | abf a2 f | gfe fed | edB BdB :|

Smyth writes it’s been popular in Clare for years. This is also the fourth jig of "Christy Barry’s set." The only first two jigs of the set are often played together as "Christy Barry’s," but the Clare flute himself actually plays four jigs in a set. I remember he said this is a Connemara setting of "The Lark in the Morning."

Mike Rafferty’s setting

X: 1
T: Dominick Rooney’s
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
D: The Dangerous Reel
K: Dmaj
~A3 AdB|AFA D2 D|daf g{a}ge|fdB BAF|
~A3 AdB|AFA D2 f|g{a}ge fed|edB BAF:|
Adf ~a3|abf a2 z|Adf a2 f|gfe fdB|
Adf ~a3|abf a2 f|g{a}ge fed|edB BAF:|

Posted .

P.J & Marcus Hernon play it too

This is the tune the Hernons play on track 5 of their album titled Beal A’ Mhurlaigh, and they just call it the Lark In The Morning.

Sean Bui

This seem to be a title given to a tune by Seamus Ennis which was ‘related to’ The Lark in the morning. I think this is it. Angelina Carberry & Martin Quinn recorded it under "Sean Bui" and noted Seamus Ennis as their source and it was also recorded by Liam Farrell and Joe Whelan on "They Sailed Away from Dublin Bay". They just call it "The Lark in the Morning".

Whatever about that, it does seem to fit the banjo quite nicely despite its simplicity.

Title

I believe Seamus Ennis himself stated the name of the tune was The Lark’s March on 40 years of Irish Piping… However this tune is not the same as the one on that album.

This is also on the Fisherstreet album.

Lark in the Morning

I learned this tune on the mandolin (D) in 4 parts and play the same way on the t. banjo (G). But I wonder what the connection of the lively jig that I play is the the stately song with the story of the Lark with "the jewel on her throat.." made popular in the 1970’ s by Steeleye Span?

The Lark in the Morning

Marcus and P.J. Hernon recorded this version of the Lark in the Morning, citing the late West Clare concertina player and piper Tommy McCarthy as the source. According to the notes of their recording, T. McCarthy learned it from Willie Clancy. McCarthy lived in London for many years, so Joe Whelan and Liam Farrell too must have picked this version of the tune from him.

Anyway, here’s a video clip of Dublin piper Mick O’Brien playing it: http://source.pipers.ie/Media.aspx?mediaId=4930

As the good doctor mentioned…

…this is on Fisherstreet’s "Out in the Night" album. They have it in (iirc) the key of A, ie, starting on the low e of the fiddle. It is also easy to transpose the tune a further semitone down to G, as well as play it as shown here in D. I’ve tried it in C too.

Easy transposability is either the sign of a good tune (Mist-covered Mountain is another example, working in Dm, Em, Gm as well as the usual key) or of an easy tune; you decide. 8))

Fisherstreet follow this tune - using a classic change - with The Humours of Glynn, http://thesession.org/tunes/469

‘Out in the Night’ must surely be one of traditional music’s greatest albums.

X:4

Based on Willie Clancy’s version
as teached by German piper Walter Lelle, Christmas 1990

X: 5 - T: “The (Old) Lark In The Morning” / “Seamus Ennis’ Lark In The Morning”

S: "Peter Carberry & Padraig McGovern: Forgotten Gems", track 3, the second of two tunes
http://thesession.org/recordings/4524

A lovely recording! :-)

I’ve avoided putting in the ornamentation, simplifying it in some places, as for crans, cuts, rolls, etc., though places for such choices/options will be obvious for most of you. For the A-part/1st-part the A2 A and AAA are as with the 5th bar, rolled, though not the only option… In submitting transcriptions here I mostly try to keep my focus on a basic melody and not the ornamentation, though I will try to work in variations where there’s usually repetition…