Green Grow The Rushes barndance

Also known as The Carol Of The Twelve Numbers, Green Grow Da Rashes, Green Grow The Rashes-O, Green Grow The Rushes Highland Fling, Green Grow The Rushes Ho, Green Grow The Rushes March, Green Grow The Rushes O, Green Grow The Rushes O Highland Fling, Green Grow The Rushes O!, Green Grow The Rushes O’, Green Grow The Rushes Oh, Green Grow The Rushes, Ho, Green Grow The Rushes, O, Green Grow The Rushes, Oh, Green Grow The Rushes-O, The Twelve Prophets.

There are 45 recordings of a tune by this name.

Green Grow The Rushes has been added to 152 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Seven settings

X: 1
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2GA BGG2|ABcd eAAB|c2ec B2dB|1 AcBA GEDE:|2 AcBA GED2|
|:g2ga ged2|eaab agef|g2ga gedB|1 AcBA GED2:|2 AcBA GEDE||
ABC
X: 2
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G>ABA BGGB|Aeed eAAB|c>Bce d/c/B/A/ GB|1 AcBA GEEF:|2 AcBA GEE2||
g>fga gddg|eaag aeef|g>age d/c/B/A/ GB|1 AcBA GEE2:|2 AcBA GEEF||
ABC
X: 3
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G - - - | Am - - - | C - G - | Am G Em C :|
|: G - - - | Am - - C | G C G - | Am G Em C :|
ABC
X: 4
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: Gzgf ged2 | eaag agef | gded BdBA | GBAG EGDE :|
|: G2BG dGBG | A2Bd efgz | G2BG dGBG | ABAG EGDE :|
# Added by bdh .
ABC
X: 5
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:"G"G2 BA BGGB|"Am"A/A/A ed eAAB|"C"c2 ce "G"dcBG|"Am"A/A/A BA "Em"GE"G"DE:|
"G"Ggga gedg|"Am"eaab agef|"G"ga"Em"ba "G"gedB|"Am"A/A/A BA "Em"GE"G"DE|
"G"Ggga gedg|"Am"eaab agef|"G"gb"Em"eg "G"dgBG|"Am"A/A/A BA "Em"GE"G"DE|]
# Added by Tate .
ABC
X: 6
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: (3DEF |G2 B>^A B>GG>B | (3AAA e>^d e>AA>B |
(3ccc e>c (3BBB d>B | (3ABc B>A G>E :|
|: D>E |G>gg>f g>dd>g | e>a-a>b a>ge>f |
[1 g2 g>a g>ed>B | A2 B>A G>E :|
[2 g>be>g d>gB>G | A>cB>A G>E |]
ABC
X: 7
T: Green Grow The Rushes
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: D |GGBA BGGB | AAed eAAB |\
c2 ce dBGB | A/B/cBA GEE :|
|: D |GGgf gddg | eea^g aeef |\
gage dBGB | G/A/cBA GEE :|
ABC

Thirty-three comments

Green Grow The Rushes (barndance)

A rousing (short) barndance I learnt in Clonmel this August.
Trevor

The Cook in the Kitchen

There is a good version of this in John Brosnans album "The Cook in the kitchen"

it makes for a lovely reel and/or hornpipe. or is a hornpipe more or less the same as a barndance? what IS the difference anyway?!

Altan and Green Grow

A few years ago Altan came through Texas to the North Texas Irish Festival on their "Another Sky" tour. We had seen them previously on their tour for Island Angel. Anyways, When they played Green Grow the Rushes, the whole place was singing, and it was so beautiful! This song evolved into one of our favorite tunes.

- - - HIGHLAND FLING / FLING / HIGHLAND - half a hornpipe - - -

Well, damned, all this stuff gathered here. I guesst things need a home and barndances and highlands are kissin’ cousins. They both have that skip in the heart, tuh-bump, or as some would have it, the hornpipe skip rhythm, in other words:

|A>Bc>d e>AA>B|

The attendant dances may have some similarities, but they differ as well…

Song

Isn’t there also a song ny this name?

"Green grow the rushes, oh
Green grow the rushes, oh"

Something like that… I know I’ve heard this song somewhere.

Dougie McLean

Crisdean - I’d say it was the Perthshire singer-songwriter Dougie McLean who was responsible for reviving this Robert Burns song. It’s "Green Grow The Rashes", not rushes. It’s been in Irish music for some time now. The Castle Ceili Band recorded it as a "fling", and that would have been around 40 years ago.

Posted by .

The tune can be find in Geraldine Cotter’s Whistle Tutor* as well on disk and as sheet music.
* whistler: its the one to have!

Another version of the tune recorded by Paul O’Shaughnessy and Harry Bradley:

K: Gmaj
G>ABA BGGB|Aeed eAAB|c>Bce d/c/B/A/ GB|1 AcBA GEEF:|2 AcBA GEE2||
g>fga gddg|eaag aeef|g>age d/c/B/A/ GB|1 AcBA GEE2:|2 AcBA GEEF||

Old Tune

This old tune is resposible for the Mexican term "Gringo" for Americans. In the MExican War, so many soldiers sang the tune "Green Grow the rushes" the Mexicans began calling them "Green Grows" or gringo. This tune was collected in the US in the 20’s from players born before 1900 in many forms… reel, march, song. The tune predates Robert Burns.

“The Carol of the Twelve Numbers” / “Green grow the rushes, Ho / O / Oh”

/ "The Twelve Prophets"

1.) * I’ll sing you one, Oh
Green grow the rushes, Oh
* What is your one, Oh?
*One is one and all alone
And evermore shall be so.

2.) * I’ll sing you two, Oh
Green grow the rushes, Oh
* What are your two, Oh?
* Two, two, lily-white boys,
* Clothed all in green, Oh
1.) One is one and all alone
And evermore shall be so.

3.) * I’ll sing you three, Oh
Green grow the rushes, Oh
* What are your three, Oh?
* Three, three, the rivals,
2.) Two, two, lily-white boys,
Clothed all in green, Oh
1.) One is one and all alone
And evermore shall be so.

4.) Four for the gospel makers
5.) Five for the symbols at your door
6.) Six for the six proud walkers
7.) Seven for the seven stars in the sky
8.) Eight for the April rainers
9.) Nine for the nine bright shiners
10.) Ten for the Ten Commandments
11.) Eleven for the eleven who went to heaven
12.) Twelve for the twelve Apostles

“Green Grow the Rushes, Oh” ~ Robert Burns

There’s no but care on every hand in every hour that passes, oh
That signifies the life of man and ‘t were not for the lassies, oh

- Chorus -

Green grow the rushes oh, green grow the rushes, oh
The sweetest hours that e’re I spent were spent among the lassies, oh

The wordly race may riches chase and riches still may fly them, oh
And when at last they catch them fast their hearts can ne’er enjoy them, oh

- Chorus -

Give me a cannie hour at e’en, my arms around my dearie, oh
And warly cares and warly men may a gae topsy-turvy, oh

- Chorus -

Old nature swears the lovely dears her noblest work she classes, oh
Her apprentice hand she tried on man and then she made the lassies, oh

- Chorus -
For you so grave you sneer at this you’re no but senseless asses, oh
The wisest man the world e’er saw, dearly loved the lassies, oh

- Chorus -

Some of you may have other/different verses, Oh?!

I’ve written a parody of the Twelve Numbers carol:

1) One is won the (insert favorite sports team) won
2) Tutu, the frilly white dress, ballerinas wear-o
3) Three, three, is "there" to a dyslexic
4) Fore for the golf ball’s coming
5) Five is the F I’ve got in math
6) Sick’s my sense of humor
7) Seven is Steven missing tea
8) I ‘ate a Cockney’s ‘aggis
9) Nein’s my knowin’ German
10) What no pun in ten did
11) ‘e’ll leaven is what a yeast’ll do
12) Two elves are helping Frodo

Good one Gary ~ :-)

Green grow the rushes - set

Michael Moriarty and Tony Murphy used to play this in the early eighties in the middle of a set designed to be a crowd pleaser.
Started with Delahunte hornpipe, then green grow the rushed as first a hornpipe then a reel and finish on Miss Mcleods.

Three tunes, three changes, and up tempo each time. Not for the purists, but if you are playing for beer then it’s a winner.

Green grow the rushes - set (extra)

I have just checked your tune list, and you have delahunte’s down as Sonny Murray’s
Sorry if that caused confusion.

I would have known this one as a fling (and there doesn’t seem to be many of this species around!)

chords for a highland tune

Green grow the rushes, Oh

Does anyone have a good chord accompaniment for this?

Playing it in G.

Any advice most appreciated

Re: chords for a highland tune

Drop this gent an e-mail. He’s a good friend of mine and I’ve heard him play it a few times. His name is Lee Agnew. Tell him the Flyin’ Fiddler sent you his way.

lagnew1@cox.net

Especially for zippydw, here are some chords to accompany the tune:

G - - - | Am - - - | C - G - | Am G Em C :|
|: G - - - | Am - - C | G C G - | Am G Em C :|

No doubt, some people would strongly disagree with my choice of chords. I am not a backer, so I habitually put in every possible chord, rather than just a few essential ones. The final bar in each part could certainly be ‘thinned out’ considerably - you could just play a C for the whole bar, in fact.

Green Grow the Rashes

The "gringo" story given by Merry-Hielander above does not refer to the song attached to this tune, but the "I’ll sing you one, Oh…" song which has different words and a different tune.

The tune here is very old, snatches of which can be found in the Straloch lute manuscript of 1627 under the name "Green Grow the Rashes, O!" and also under another title, "I Kist While She Blusht". Burns later got hold of the tune and gave it the verses we are familiar with now, quoted by ceolachan above.

Green Grow the Rashes

It should also be said that Burns was inspired by an older song which can be found in Herd’s Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs in 1776:

Green grows the rashes, O,
Green grows the rashes, O,
The feather bed is no sae saft
As a bed amang the rashes.

We’re a’ dry wi’ drinking o’t,
We’re a’ dry wi’ drinking o’t,
The parson kist the fidler’s wife,
And he coudna preach for thinking o’t.

The down-bed, the feather bed,
The bed amang the rashes O;
Yet a’ the beds is na sae saft
As the bellies o’ the lasses, O.

You can see what attracted Burns to re-making the song, and in fact he wrote an X-rated version of the song for private amusement.

Green grow chord accompaniment

NCRC-

Thanks I will give it a shot this week. I am working to play this next Sunday. I was hoping to fill out the tune on later verses after playing tune only.

If I come up with anything interesting from these, I will post

Chieftains 6

This tuned is also played on this album, which for whatever reason isn’t in this websites recording database…

"This old tune is resposible for the Mexican term "Gringo" for Americans"

That old chestnut…. Considering that the word was used in Spain in the century before the Mexican War, it is clearly one of those myths that are perpetuated by the folkie world - like the other one that claims "The Rose of Allandale" is about a boat, there is no evidence to support it and plenty to debunk it.

http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/gringo.asp

Chieftains

"This tuned is also played on this album, which for whatever reason isn’t in this websites recording database"

Yes it is. The album was not called "Chieftains 6" when it was released.

http://www.thesession.org/recordings/display/521

Aamos

On AAMOS’s album *Caravan*, the tune is played with the A and B parts reversed, with a variation, as follows:

|: Gzgf ged2 | eaag agef | gded BdBA | GBAG EGDE :|
|: G2BG dGBG | A2Bd efgz | G2BG dGBG | ABAG EGDE :|

Posted by .

X: 7 “Green Grow the Rushes, O” ~ Donegal

B: "Dances of Donegal", collected by Grace Orpen, D.M. Wilkie, London, 1931
The first few pages of this book, and its first tune & dance:
"The Fairy Dance" - http://thesession.org/tunes/424

The Corn Rigs (Couple Dance)
Tune: "Green Grow the Rushes, O" (4/4)

Steps - - - - - - - - - Description - - - - - - - - - Bars

Partners stand facing each other with hands held crossed, elbows straight.
The man starts with his left foot, the woman with her right.
A. - - - Described for the woman.
Step to the right with the right foot. Step on left foot closing feet up, step on right foot, then hop on right foot,

swinging left foot across with a flick of the foot.
Repeat in the other direction.
Swing right foot behind left, step on it and hop with left leg raised forward. Swing left foot behind right, step on it and

hop with right foot raised. Repeat. - - - 4
Repeat. - - - 4
B. - - - Hold partner in waltz grip and polka round. - 8


<[ NOTES: This dance, as described, is a basic schottische. One way to dance this is to progress forward, 123-hop, 223-hop, then followed by the four step-hops, which can either be a step-behind as described here, or moving forward, or turning. There are many variations possible. The classic finish, another option, would be to ‘polka round’ for bars 1-6 of the B-part, and then turning for four step-hops, ‘doubling’… Also, there are, and I’ve danced and known, several different dances that go by the name "The Corn Rigs". ]>

B: "Dances of Donegal", collected by Grace Orpen, D.M. Wilkie, London, 1931
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(page 30 - music notation & dance description)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

“Dances of Donegal” collected and edited by Grace Orpen, 1931 - ITMA digital copy

ITMA: Irish Traditional Music Archive/Taisce Cheol DÚchais Éireann
http://www.itma.ie/
Grace Orpen’s Local Donegal Dances, 1931
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/print-collection/donegal-dances-1931
"Dances of Donegal" collected and edited by Grace Orpen, 1931
Click on ‘32 Pages’ to view them, with Grace Orpen’s ‘Figures’/illustrations…
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/book/dances-of-donegal