Varsovienne mazurka

Varsovienne has been added to 21 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Five settings

X: 1
T: Varsovienne
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
|:f>d B2 B2|g>e c2 c2|F>A c>e d>c|B>A B>c d>e|
ABC
X: 2
T: Varsovienne
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
|:Chuck-uh Boom2 Boom2|Chuck-uh Boom2 Boom2|
ABC
X: 3
T: Varsovienne
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
|: d>B G2 G2 | e>c A2 G2 | ^F>D E>F G>A | B>A B>c d>B |
d>B G2 G2 | e>c A2 A2 | D>^F A>c B>A | G2 G4 :|
|: B>G c>B A>G | G2 ^F4 | D>^F A>c B>A | G>^F G>A B>G |
>G c>B A>G | G2 ^F4 | D>^F A>c B>A | G2 G4 :|
ABC
X: 4
T: Varsovienne
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
|: f>d B2 B2 | g>e c2 c2 | F>^A c>e d>c | B>^A B>c d>e |
f>d B2 B2 | g>e c2 c2 | F>^A c>e d>c | B2 B4 :|
|:d>B e>d c>B | B2 ^A4 | F>^A c>e d>c | B>^A B>c d>B |
d>B e>d c>B | B2 ^A4 | F>^A c>e d>c | B2 B4 :|
ABC
X: 5
T: Varsovienne
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
B2 B2 g>e | c2 c2 F>^A | c>e d>c B>^A | B>c d>e f>d |
B2 B2 g>e | c2 c2 F>^A | c>e d>c B2 | B4 :|
e>d c>B B2 | ^A4 F>^A | c>e d>c B>^A | B>c d>B d>B |
e>d c>B B2 | ^A4 F>^A | c>e d>c B2 | B4 :|
G2 G2 e>c | A2 G2 ^F>D | E>F G>A B>A | B>c d>B d>B |
G2 G2 e>c | A2 A2 D>^F | A>c B>A G2 | G4 :|
c>B A>G G2 | ^F4 D>^F | A>c B>A G>^F | G>A B>G B>G |
c>B A>G G2 | ^F4 D>^F | A>c B>A G2 | G4 :|
ABC

Twelve comments

I love this one, simple and sweet - - -

What more can I say…

I know, I know, I keep saying it - don’t foget that rolling skip

Just to keep it simple, that shared skip with the Hornpipe family isn’t being notated but is there in the playing of Mazurkas and Varsoviennes, for example:

|:f>d B2 B2|g>e c2 c2|F>A c>e d>c|B>A B>c d>e|

- - - That ‘BOOM Chuck-uh BOOM’ thang - - -

Alright, I don’t want to be alone in this, and it would be nice to give you the advice of another. Now, while he screwed up, or someone did, in the naming and categorization of certain tunes, he didn’t put the Varsovienne under ‘Waltzes’, though it missed ‘Mazurkas’ and went under ‘MISCELLANEOUS’, in his less "see what I can do" moods he is one damned find accompanist, and on the whole a really considerate musician, and a good teacher too, enough of that, check out his various books, including:

"Interview With a Vamper: Piano Accompaniment Techniques for Traditional Dance Music"

by Peter Barnes

Ouch!, Alright already, enough of the invectives and expletive deleteds amongst those of you who hate piano accompaniment. I know most of it is bad, and those cheap keyboards, and even I have been subjected to someone coming in with their little rhythm box keyboard and amp, AAAAA!!! Peter isn’t like that, despite the ‘Vamper’ in the title. He actually has ears and uses them, listens. I hope that’s still true, as it has been awhile since we’ve heard him.

Anyway, here’s a short quote from another of his books, "A Little Couple-Dancemusik", ‘dancemusik’, a bit weak on Mazurkas and the Varsovienne side of things, and a bit confused too. Personally, I cringe when I see someone being cute with the likes of ‘Dancemusik’, ye oldie-worldie ****… But he generally knows his stuff, at least when it comes to accompaniment and when he hasn’t gotten lost in his own abilities, as we all can at times. Enough praise balanced with chastisement, here’s the quote, page 236:

MAZURKAS

"Are like waltzes but with more fire and rhythmic accentuation. Give mazurkas strong beats of the ‘1’ and ‘3’ of the measure."

- - - So I ain’t the only one tellin’ yuh…

Tanzhaus - Folklore - Tanz - und MusiKveranstaltungen - Das Varsovienne

AND - extending from the above and not covered in the Peter Barnes works, the Varsovienne, as I’ve tended to notate it, following the earlier conventions:

|:Chuck-uh Boom2 Boom2|Chuck-uh Boom2 Boom2|
Chuck-uh Boom2 Boom2|Boom2 Boom4|

Gesundheit!

- - - Two Sharps Missing The Boat - ### B Dorian - - -

My mind misfiring not the website, mea culpa. I was thinking three sharps, as in A, and Dorian, but it isn’t an A Dorian tune but a B Dorian tune - three sharps…

Varsovianas

I can’t inderstand most of the comments above. But the tune isn’t a Mazurka; its a vasoviana.The dance is different.People don’t do them any more but they were quite popular in Victorian times. Anyone who thinks they are waltzes has missed the point.

Noel Jackson
Angels of the North

Noelbats - Check the title! - history lessons are elsewhere on this site…

Note: There isn’t a seperate category here for Varsoviennes and they do belong to the same family as the Mazurka, in fact some tunes can do dual duty…

Sorry you can’t inderstand most of what was written prior to your contribution. Some of what is written above is about ‘accompaniment’, whether keeping time with your foot to get that pulse going that defines the ‘Varsovienne/Varsoviana’, or how you chord it, that ‘Boom-Chuck’, Italian terminology, sorry…

Yes they do still dance this, including several flavours in dear old Eire/Ireland. In my travels I’ve danced at least a dozen varieties of this dance, not counting mazurkas. And while the ‘Victorians’ danced it as well, earliest date of introduction about 1850, it wasn’t confined to the then British Empire, though since some had a tendency to claim to rule over the whole world - - - I don’t agree… It started in France, and besides, ‘Victorian’ is a state or mind and there are still a few stragglers around…

Another of the comments, which seems pretty clear to me, is confessing I’d screwed up. My brain misfired and I’d first put in the wrong Dorian. It should be three sharps and B Dorian. But if you’re not into modes, just remember that it is three sharps, which are missing on the staffed music, under ‘sheetmusic’…

NOT DORIAN!!! - was it the drugs, alcohol, or lack of sleep ~

Nah! It is probably my musical dyslexia, mixing up ‘g’ and ‘a’, after all they are only next door neighbours.

This is B Harmonic minor:
B - c# - d - e f# - g - a# - b

The correction is made in the ABCs…

K: G Minor Harmonic

|: d>B G2 G2 | e>c A2 G2 | ^F>D E>F G>A | B>A B>c d>B |
d>B G2 G2 | e>c A2 A2 | D>^F A>c B>A | G2 G4 :|
|: B>G c>B A>G | G2 ^F4 | D>^F A>c B>A | G>^F G>A B>G |
>G c>B A>G | G2 ^F4 | D>^F A>c B>A | G2 G4 :|

g - a - _b - c - d - _e - f# - g harmonic minor

Intemperance

Following the rather intemperate comments above, I shall rephrase what I said.
The tune is a varsoviana which is not the same as a waltz in Northumbria. Varsovianas were very popular in the North-east of England in the last two decades of the 19th century and were still occuring occcasionally on dance cards until the second world war when they were regarded as "Olde Time".

It is recognized that they are imports from eastern Europe, but there again, so are an awfulk lot of our popular dance forms.

However, they are no longer part of the traditional repetoire of he living Northumbrian tradition, though several of the more experienced Northumbrian musicians still pull them out as a break from faster pieces.

I agree with the suggestion that playing a varsoviana is like thinking hornpie when playing a waltz.
Noel
Angels of the North

;-)

Damn! forgot to add a relevant link:

http://www.thesession.org/tunes/2320

"Shoe the Donkey", by whatever name you might have for it, or take on it, is a Varsovienne or -ana… You’ll find some notations for the dance in the comments for this link…

Varsoviennes ~ here is how some others like to notate these ~

X: 1
T: Varsovienne
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: mazurka
K: b minor
|: f>d |\
B2 B2 g>e | c2 c2 F>^A | c>e d>c B>^A | B>c d>e f>d |
B2 B2 g>e | c2 c2 F>^A | c>e d>c B2 | B4 :|
|: d>B |\
e>d c>B B2 | ^A4 F>^A | c>e d>c B>^A | B>c d>B d>B |
e>d c>B B2 | ^A4 F>^A | c>e d>c B2 | B4 :|

K: g minor
|: d>B |\
G2 G2 e>c | A2 G2 ^F>D | E>F G>A B>A | B>c d>B d>B |
G2 G2 e>c | A2 A2 D>^F | A>c B>A G2 | G4 :|
|: B>G |\
c>B A>G G2 | ^F4 D>^F | A>c B>A G>^F | G>A B>G B>G |
c>B A>G G2 | ^F4 D>^F | A>c B>A G2 | G4 :|