Lord Lovat’s Lament hornpipe

Also known as Lord Lovat’s Lament March.

There are 9 recordings of a tune by this name.

Lord Lovat's Lament has been added to 60 tunebooks.

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One setting

X: 1
T: Lord Lovat's Lament
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
(AB)|c2 (ce) dcBA|(c<e)(e>f) e2 (fg)|a2 (ea) (fe)(cA)|(c<B)(B>c) B2 (AB)|
c2 (ce) (dc)(BA)|c<ee>e fecA|(d>e) (fe/d/) c<edB|(B<A)(A>B) A2 (fg)|
a2 (ea) fecA|(c<e)(e>f) e2 (fg)|a2 (ea) (fe)(cA)|(c<B)(B>c) B2 (fg)|
a2 (ea) (fe)(cA)|c<ee>e fecA|(d>e) (fe/d/) c<edB|(B<A)(A>B) A4 ||
# Added by Gard .
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Nine comments

This is a tune I know nothing about, but I’ve learned it by Douglas Stuart from Inverness.

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Check out 78th Fraser Highlanders

Their "Live in Concert in Ireland" CD begins with this tune. An awesome sound to hear a tight pipe band playing this tune.

The key is wrong it should be A mixolydian not A major. This is one of my favorite tunes to play on GH Pipes.

Sounds like a march.

“Lord Lovat’s Lament” ~ The Fiddler’s Companion ~ march

http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/index.html
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/LORC_LORP.htm

LORD LOVAT’S LAMENT (Cumha Mhic Shimidh). AKA and see "Lament for the Highland Clearances." Scottish (originally), Canadian; Slow March (4/4 time). Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major (Johnson, Perlman): G Major (Martin, Sweet). Standard. AB (Johnson, Sweet): AABB (Martin, Perlman). A well‑known bagpipe march which entered fiddle repertory, perhaps through fife and drum sources. The piece is said to have been composed by either Ewen MacGregor or his pupil David Fraser, both pipers to Simon Lord Lovat, famous in the unsuccessful Jacobite rebellion of 1745 (see note for “Lord Lovat Beheaded”).

Key

We play this in the pub in G and it sound good not so sure about A it needs a a Gsharp

Lord Lovat’s

Without doubt in A mix. Gnat. it’s a highland pipe tune.

Lord Lovat’s Lament

Twenty years ago, or so, I spoke with a knowledgable piper about this tune. I asked him about Ossian’s version as an air (the tune is simply far better as an air). According to him, the tune was borrowed from a Gaelic song, and is properly played as an air. It wasn’t until the British army "got hold of it" that it was transformed into a march. Supporting his position is the fact that the tune is played as an air or slow march in the background of a scene in the old movie "Gunga Din".