The Fairy Dance reel

Also known as Arrane Queeyl-Nieuee, Car Ny Ferrishyn, Dawns Y Tylwyth Teg, Faeries’, The Faire’s, The Fairies’ Dance, Fairy, Fairy Dance, The Fairy, Gows, Largo’s Fairy Dance, Old Molly Hare, Quick Scotch, Snieu Queeyl Snieu, Snieu, Wheeyl, Snieu, Snieue-Queeyl-Snieue.

There are 95 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Humours Of Whiskey (a few times), The Mason’s Apron (a few times).

The Fairy Dance has been added to 481 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Eight settings

X: 1
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: f2fd f2fd | f2fd cdeg | f2fd gfed | cABc defg :|
|: a2af b2bf | g2ge a2ag | f2fd gfed |1 cABc defg :|2 cABc d3 ||
ABC
X: 2
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
g|~f2dg ~f2dg|~f2dB cdeg|~f2df gfed|cABc dfag|
fAdg fAdg|fAdB cdeg| (3fga df gfed|cABc d2~f2|
aAdf bagf|(3gfe ce aeAg|fdBd gfed|cABc d2~f2|
a2 (3fga bagf|(3gfe ce Aceg|fdBd gfed|cA (3GFE D4||
ABC
X: 3
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
F>G|A2A>A (A/c/d/e/) (f/c/d/B/)|A2F>F F2d>c|\
(Acde) fcdB|A2F>F F2d>c|Bged cbac|d2d>d d2:|!
|:f>g|a2a>f b2b>a|g/f/g/a/ ge a2ag|\
D>E|F2F>F (F/A/F/A/) (d/A/B/G/)|F2D>D D2F>F|\
FAFA dABG|F2D>D D2B>A|GBcA FFGE|F2F>F F2:|!
|:d>e|f2f>d g2g>f|e/d/e/f/ ecf2fe|dcBA GA/B/ e/d/c/B/|FAFA GABc|!
d3e/d/ A3d/A/|F3A/F/ A3F/A/|FABG FD AG|F2F>F F2:|]
ABC
X: 4
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
g |: fAdg fAdg | fAde cdeg | fAdf gfed |1 cABc d4 :|2 cAbc defg ||
a2 ag b>bba | geee aaag | fadf gfed |1 cABc defg :|2 cAbc d4 ||
ABC
X: 5
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
a2af b4 | g2ge a3a | ffff gggg | edef d4 | aaaf bb2b | ggge A4 | f2f2 g2g2 | edef d4 ||
ABC
X: 6
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
a2aa fdfa|fdfa age2|a2aa fdfa|1 agec defg :|2 agec dcde|
f2f2 dBB2|g2gg eccc|a2aa fdfa|1 agec dcde :|2 agec d4||
ABC
X: 7
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
f2fd f2fd | gfed cde2 | f2fd gfed | cABc d2d2 |
f2fd f2fd | gfed cde2 | f2fd gfed | cABc defg |
a2af b2ba | g2ge a2ag | f2fd gfed | cABc defg |
a2af b2ba | g2ge a2ag | f2fd gfed | cABc d2d2 ||
ABC
X: 8
T: The Fairy Dance
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
M: 2/4
|: ff/d/ ff/d/ | ff/d/ e/c/G/e/ | f[f/d/]d/ g/f/e/d/ | c/A/B/c/ dd :|
|: aa/f/ bb/a/ | gg/e/ aa/g/ | ff/d/ g/f/e/d/ | c/A/B/c/ d/e/f/g/ |
a/^g/a/f/ b/a/=g/f/ | g/f/g/e/ a/g/f/e/ | f/e/f/d/ g/f/e/d/ | c/A/B/c/ dd :|
ABC

Thirty-four comments

Fairy Dance

This is is a realy old Scottish tune and is in Gow’s Original Collection, although there is some debate as to whether he wrote it or merely noted down an existing tune.

There are all sorts of other names

Including Old Molly Hare and Largo’s Fairy Dance

Another version

If you are looking for the version on Natalie McMaster’s ‘In My Hands’ CD, it is "a multi-part version evolved from Skinner’s set in the Harp and Claymore. Winston Fitzgerald’s setting is close…". See cranfordpub.com/natalie/Hands to find a link to Fitz. Have fun!

Another version II

You can also find a longer version at www.minarsas.demon.co.uk/harn/folksongs/fairy.htm

Here is the version played on the uilleann pipes on track 1 of The Chieftains 4.

X: 1
T:Fairy Dance
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:Reel
K:D
g|~f2dg ~f2dg|~f2dB cdeg|~f2df gfed|cABc dfag|
fAdg fAdg|fAdB cdeg| (3fga df gfed|cABc d2~f2|
aAdf bagf|(3gfe ce aeAg|fdBd gfed|cABc d2~f2|
a2 (3fga bagf|(3gfe ce Aceg|fdBd gfed|cA (3GFE D4||

Longer version

You can also find the multi-part version in a book entitled "Session Tunes for Scots Fiddlers" available at all good folk music shops. It also includes a multi-part version of Masons Apron.

Old Molly Hare

Here’s the version of the A part that I play.

d2f2gfeg|f2d2edBA|d2f2gfed|cABcd4

I guess that’s the Old Molly Hare version.

Largo’s Fairy Dance

Don’t know why I got interested in this, this morning. I’ve looked it up, and I gather that ‘Largo’s Fairy Dance’ actually consists of two Gow tunes, The Fairy Dance, as posted here, and The Fairies Advance. I’ve found two versions of the Fairies Advance, here:

http://www.village-music-project.org.uk/abc/HARRISON.ABC

To save people having to scroll down and find them, here they are:

X: 57
T:Fairies Advance,The.(primo) RH.043
M:C
L:1/8
Q:120
S:Rev.R.Harrison’s MS,c1815,Cumbria
R:March
O:England
A:Temple Sowerby,Cumbria
Z:vmp.Simon Wilson….
K:D
F>G|A2A>A (A/c/d/e/) (f/c/d/B/)|A2F>F F2d>c|\
B/A/G/F/ dA f/e/d/c/ B/A/G/F/|F2E>E E2F>G|!
(Acde) fcdB|A2F>F F2d>c|Bged cbac|d2d>d d2:|!
|:f>g|a2a>f b2b>a|g/f/g/a/ ge a2ag|\
fedc Be/f/ g/f/e/d/|dcBA Bcde|!
f3g/f/ e3f/e/|d3e/d/ c3d/c/|\
Bc/d/ e/f/g/e/ d/c/B/A/ B/d/c/e/|d2d>d d2:|]

X: 58
T:Fairies Advance,The.(secundo) The RH.043
M:C
L:1/8
Q:100
S:Rev.R.Harrison’s MS,c1815,Cumbria
R:March
O:England
A:Temple Sowerby,Cumbria
Z:vmp.Simon Wilson….
K:D
D>E|F2F>F (F/A/F/A/) (d/A/B/G/)|F2D>D D2F>F|\
G/F/E/D/ FF d/c/B/A/ G/F/E/D/|D2A>A A2D>E|!
FAFA dABG|F2D>D D2B>A|GBcA FFGE|F2F>F F2:|!
|:d>e|f2f>d g2g>f|e/d/e/f/ ecf2fe|dcBA GA/B/ e/d/c/B/|FAFA GABc|!
d3e/d/ A3d/A/|F3A/F/ A3F/A/|FABG FD AG|F2F>F F2:|]

Both seem to have B parts that are similar to The Fairy Dance B part, but which is the Gow tune? Is either one the Gow tune, or is it something else again?

Chords to Fairy Dance

|D ( F#aug )|D A7|D G(or Em)|A7 D:|
|:D B7|Em A7|D G(or Em)|A7 D:|

Danu’s Version

As written down by Nigel Gatherer

K:D
g |: fAdg fAdg | fAde cdeg | fAdf gfed |1 cABc d4 :|2 cAbc defg ||
a2 ag b>bba | geee aaag | fadf gfed |1 cABc defg :|2 cAbc d4 ||

from http://www.thesession.org/discussions/17161

The Fairies’ Advance

Has anyone tried playing the Primo and secundo Fairies Advance together? They look like clarinet and fiddle parts for the same tune.

I never liked this tune much. The G version (see link above) is nicer, or should I say, slightly less irritating!

It’s listed under miscellaneous in O’Neill’s because, I assume, it is more of a schottische than a reel.
See how for instance, the run: gfed |1 cABc defg (here in D) is also found in
The Blacksmith Schottische’s cBAG FDEF|GABc (in G)
http://www.thesession.org/tunes/7945

Depends how it’s played….

If you think you don’t like this tune, have a listen to Steph Geremia’s version. Could well change your mind.

Posted by .

I’ve heard many versions and none did ‘it’ for me, K. But it is true that ‘version’, interpretation or setting has everything to do with ‘it’.
I’ve realised today, for instance, that the 2d part of The Holy Land (see: http://www.thesession.org/tunes/616) is very similar to the 1st part of The Fairy Dance, in one of its versions at least. Yet I love the Holy Land. How uncanny!
The question is: will it make me like the Fairy Dance better or will I begin to hate The Holy Land? :-o
I’ll try not to think too hard about that one!

Rumpelstiltskin gets involved!

This tune is truly Fairy’s work!
In Moore’s Manx Ballads, Mona Douglas wrote that this tune ‘Arrane Queeyl-Nieuee’ is one of the rare surviving songs of labour and one of only two cante-fables that survived on Man. What have the fairies got to do with it then? Read ‘The Lazy Wife’ at: http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/sm1911/p062.htm (from Sophia Morrisson’s Manx Fairy Tales (1911) or in Folk Song Journal, No28)

Here’s how goes:
X: 1
T: Arrane Queeyl-Nieuee / Spinning Wheel Song / "Snieu, Wheeyl, Snieu" / ‘Snieu, Queeyl, Snieu’
M: 2/2
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: Dmaj
a2af b4 | g2ge a3a | ffff gggg | edef d4 | aaaf bb2b | ggge A4 | f2f2 g2g2 | edef d4 ||

Snieu, wheeyl, snieu,
Snieu, wheeyl, snieu;
Dy chooiley vangan er y villey,
Snieu, ermyskyn,
Lesh y ree yn ollan,
As lesh my hene y snaih;
Son shenn Trit Trot
cha vow ish dybraa.

Snieu, wheeyl, snieu
’Rane wheeyl, ’rane,
As dy chooilley chlea er y thie
Snieu ermyhon.
Lesh y ree yn ollan bane
As lesh my hene y snaih;
Son shenn Trit-Trot,
cha vow ish dy-braa!

Snieu, wheeyl, snieu;
’Rane wheeyl, ’rane,
As dy chooilley tonn er y thie
Snieu ermyhon.
Lesh y ree yn ollan kkear
As lesh my hene y snaih;
Son tra bee y Fidder cheet,
Cha vow ish dy-braa!

ie:
a2 (af) b4 |
Snieu wheeyl snieu |
g2 (ge) a3 a |
Snieu wheeyl snieu; Dy
ff ff gg gg |
chooiley vangan er y villey |
(ed) ef d4 |
Snieu ermyskyn |
aa af bb2 b
Lesh y ree yn ollan, As |
gg ge A4|
lesh my ~hene~ y snaih |
f2 f2 g2 g2 |
Son shenn Trit Trot
ed ef d4||
cha vow ish dybraa ||
etc


I gleaned those interesting notes (both musical and scholarly) in The Manx National Song Book (vol 2, Compiled by Charles Guard, Shearwater Press 1980) where the melody is notated in F Major & 2/4. I transposed it in D, 2/2 for ease of comparison. NB: This song version has only one part.

A peep at the fairies

With its insistent and descending-ascending phrases, this tune reminds me strongly of this other fling-like tune, once common, I presume, all over the contredanse dancing West, known as Cochinchine in French, Den Toppede Hone in Denmark, etc…

Here’s a setting of it…

X:1
T: Cochinchine
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:
K:Dmaj
a2aa fdfa|fdfa age2|a2aa fdfa|1 agec defg :|2 agec dcde|
f2f2 dBB2|g2gg eccc|a2aa fdfa|1 agec dcde :|2 agec d4||

…and a short peep at the ‘fairy dance’ that accompanies it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kM-XWURhLQU


The Fairy Dance followed by Cochinchine makes a nice set.

Manx version

Another Manx version of the tune is called Car ny Ferrishyn (Tune of the Fairies), which I’ve added above. The Dukes of Atholl ruled the Isle of Man for parts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and as they were the Gows’ patrons, it is possible that this is how the tune found its way to the Island.

Cochinchine

is this tune is the same as the version of Fairy dance posted by birlibirdie above? or have i missed something? if so apologies.

X: 8 “The Fairy Reel”

B: "Dances of Donegal", collected by Grace Orpen, D.M. Wilkie, London, 1931

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page 10 - music notation / page 11 - dance description
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Dance: The Fairy Reel
Tune: "The Fairy Dance" 2/4

Six dancers: 2 Men and 4 Women
The dancers stand as Fig. 1, facing across the set. (3-facing-3)
They stand still for the first four bars of music, then join hands and dance in place for four bars. - - - 8

Steps - - - - - - - - - Description - - - - - - - - - Bars

1 - - - Advance and retire. Repeat. - - - 8
2 - - - The three dancers on either side join hands.
- - - - -Ring to right and left. - - - 8
3 - - - Men advance to meet, while 1st and 2nd women face each other and cross over to opposite side, passing right shoulders, while 3rd and 4th women do

the same. - - - 2
- - - - -Men retire while women dance in place facing each other. - - - 2
- - - - -Men retire while 1st and 2nd, 3rd and 4th women cross over back to place passing right shoulders. - - - 2
- - - - -Men advance while women dance in place facing across the set. - - - 2
4 - - - 1st man and 1st woman join inside hands, while 2nd man and 4th woman do the same. 2nd and 3rd women turnm to their right, Fig. 2.
- - - - -All advance and dance in place. - - - 4
- - - - -2nd and 3rd women retire and dance in place while couples turn, advance and dance in place. - - - 4
- - - - -Repeat the figure, the 1st man dancing with the 2nd woman and the 2nd man with the 3rd woman. - - - 8
5 - - - 1st man turns 2nd woman, while 2nd man turns 3rd woman, linking left arms. - - - 2
- - - - -1st man turns 1st woman while 2nd man turns 4th woman linking right arms. - - - 2
- - - - -Repeat. - - - 4
- - - - -Repeat whole dance ending with "Hands About" in two rings.


This page also includes two small figures/illustrations using squares and circles to represent the dancers, 3-facing-3, a man with a woman on either hand.

Change of figures ~ X = square = woman / O = man ~ an attempt to approximate

FIG. 1

1-1-2
X-O-X

X-O-X
3-2-4
- - - - -

FIG. 2

X-O \ -X

X- \ O-X


<[ NOTES: The root to the official ceili dance "The Fairy Reel". ]>

S: “Dances of Donegal” collected and edited by Grace Orpen

————————
Price - - 3/-
————————

Obtainable from
D.M. Wilkie
383, Clapham Road
London, S.W.9
—-
1931

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- - - MAKING SENSE OF THESE DESCRIPTIONS/DANCES?! - - -
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Mostly I’ll leave this up to you, though I have entered a few simple guides, such as CW for clockwise and ACW for anti-clockwise (or counter clockwise). Some of these dances will be seen to be obvious roots for some of the ‘official’, booked & standardized, 32 ceili dances of An Coimisun le Rinci Gaelacha/The Irish Dance Commission. I promised I’d make this publication available for one Donegal dance instructor and thought ~ why not make it available to anyone else with an interest in the dances of Donegal and the history of Irish social dancing? So, here it is, make what you will of them.

I have collected these dances myself in the North, Ulster, including Donegal, and the descriptions of non-progressive dances, such as the six-hand version of the first dance, "The Fairy Reel", fit what had been shared freely with me in my wandering around the countryside asking for a tune or a dance. All wonderful folk, on the whole, and even those balaclava clad lads with their 45s, and the British Army lads having a ‘chat’ with me with their guns trained on me. The lad laying flat in the ditch with his rifle aimed at me, when I opened up instrument cases to show they weren’t weapons, there had been gun fire in the area, County Armagh, piping in with something along the lines of "Back home (England) I play accordion in a ceili(dh) band!" (Was it one of you?)
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CONTENTS (page 5)

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. PAGE
(Forward .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 7 - 9)
The Fairy Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 10, 11
http://thesession.org/tunes/424
Six Handed Duke .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 12, 13
The Irish Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 14, 15
A Trip to the Cottage .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 16, 17
"Strasperry" Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 18, 19
The Irish National, or "Petticoat Swish" .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 20, 21
The Waves of Tory .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 22, 23
Six Handed Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 24
The "Pin" Dance .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 25
Shoe the Donkey .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 26 - couple dance
http://thesession.org/tunes/13745
Military Two-Step .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .27 - couple dance
http://thesession.org/tunes/1080
The Highland .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 28 - couple dance
http://thesession.org/tunes/5418
The Barn Dance .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 29 - couple dance
http://thesession.org/tunes/3357
The Corn Rigs .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 30 - couple dance
http://thesession.org/tunes/1936
Berlin Polky .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .31 - couple dance
http://thesession.org/tunes/1133

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(page 7)

FOREWARD

These dances have been collected from the peasants in Donegal, and are all Set or Couple Dances, emplying only a few simple steps. The complicated Solo Jigs have purposely been omitted as no two dancers agree as to the correct order and performance of the steps.

The Donegal peasants dance on the stoe floors of their cottage kitchens in their thick boots, and the characteristic stamps and beats which mark the rhythm should be imitated. An effort has been made to preserve the dances in their simplicity; only dances still performed have been included in this collection. The style is simple and the footwork should not be stressed. The aim should be rather correct figure formation than a precise execution of steps.

The dances have been handed down from one generation to another, and as is always the case, words used in explanation have come to have a different form through inaccuracies in pronunciation.

For example, the "Strasperry" Reel is obviously a corruption of "Strathspey," the "Polky" was once a "Polka," while the "Petticoat Swish" must have been given its name when long petticoats were a feature of the women’s costume.

The tunes for "Show the Donkey," the "Corn Rigs," and one or two others have been taken down by ear from a musician in Donegal. He in turn has been handed them down from another generation, so that tunes similar t these may be found under different names in other parts of the country with slight variations. Irish Jig and Reel tunes are numberless, and though in this collection one tune only has been allotted to each dance, other tunes can be substitued or added to avoid monotony.

A violin or a concertina is the musical instrument most commonly employed, but for convenience the music in this book has been arranged for the piano. The musician decides the length of the dance—-for all can be repeated as many times as desired, or the leader of the Set claps to indicate that the dance is over.

The tunes are arranged in two phrases of eight bards marked for convenience in the music as A and B. Each phrase unless otherwise stated, is played twice through. Every new step must begin with a new phrase of the music, but it is not necessary for each repat of the whole dance to begin with the A music.

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(page 8)

THE STEPS

Throughout the dances, unless otherwise directed, if the dancers move forward, backwards, or round in a ring, either a lilting walking step or a change of step is used; the men generally the former and the women the latter. This rule if strictly applied would make the dance very monotonous, so many variations may be introduced and dancers as they gain in proficiency may introduce extra steps and beats as they wish.

Individual steps are explained as they occur in the dances. Unless otherwise directed, the right foot begins.

THE FIGURES

The dances have been divided into:
(a) Set Dances for a definite number.
(b) Set Dances for any number.
(c) Couple Dances.

In the diagrams the women are described by squares and the men by circles. The course of the figure and the direction are shown by a dotted line and arrowhead.

When hands are joined they are held at shoulder level with the elbows bent. A few fundamental figures which occur in the dances are described here and referred to later by name only.

‘Advance and Retire’
Two couples or two lines of dancers stand facing each other with hands joined. They advance to meet each other with four steps and retire backwards in the same manner. This occupies four bars of music and is always repeated.

‘Ring to Right and Left’
The dancers join hands and turning to the right move round (ACW) for eight steps, turn without dropping hands and repeat to the left (CW).

‘Lead Round’
Partners join inside hands, i.e. the man takes the girl’s left hand in his right, and lead round in a ring to the right (ACW) for eight steps. They drop hands, turn and lead home (CW) with the other hand. The woman is on the outer side all the time.

‘Follow Round’
The dancers follow each other round in a ring to the right (ACW) for eight steps, the man following his own partner. They turn and follow back (CW) to place. Dancers must face the middle as they change direction.

(page 9)

‘Dance in Place’
At the beginning of each dance and between most of the figures the dancers stand and mark rhythm of the music for two or four bars as directed.

‘The Swing’
This figure is characteristic of the Donegal dances and requires practice. Partners face each other, the woman places her hands on her partner’s shoulders while the man places his hands on her hips. The right feet are placed close to each other and take the weight. In this position the couple swing by pushing off with the left feet at first slowly and then with increasing speed then gradually decreasing as the music finishes. A swing occupies eight bars of music, occasionally double or half the time is given. Dancers should keep both feet close to each other and avoid too boisterous a movement.

‘Hands About’
The leader of the set or the musician calls "Hands about" to finish the dance. All dancers join hands in a ring, with their hands resting on each other’s shoulders. In this position they travel round to the left as in the "Swing."

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More Fairy Dance Stuff

I have an idea that the tune Fairy Dance might well have been an inspiration for a pop song of the early 20th Century; it’s called "Just You, Just Me". Tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Wardell Gray made sweet hay with this tune.

Lester Young playing Just You, Just Me:

http://youtu.be/XTzLFveREu8


As a fiddle tune, I hear the chords of the first part of the Fairy Dance as: D—G—Em—A—D—G—A7—D.

Fairy Dance

Mmm, don’t hear that at all myself, JYJM is nowhere near as repetitious or hypnotic or whatever, and its chords are D-B-G-G#dim-D-A, at least in almost every take I’ve heard; haven’t listened to Lester and Wardell yet, maybe they reharmonized it. Don’t doubt that jazzers might go slumming through folk material for stuff though, I always thought Like Someone in Love’s opening notes sounded suspiciously like Danny Boy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHsMXQRiapA


Sometimes you hear a jazz player quote the Irish Washerwoman; I once came across Benny Goodman playing the Collier’s Reel in the opening of a Billy Holiday side, which is an order of magnitude more hip. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVsrh6Sle2E


“Smoked Cheese and Sausage Lasagna”

Now look what happens when I forget to add an important extra. distractions in the kitchen, like now, waiting for the Toulouse sausages and buffalo mozzarella to thaw so I can get the the important task of creating three evenings worth of lasagna for us, loosely following a favourite recipe from an old copy of a mag we used to subscribe to, "Bon Appétit", March 2004, page 106, “Smoked Cheese and Sausage Lasagna”.

I got a good chuckle out of this and enjoyed the links. Back to what I’d forgotten to add here, not about the rest of the ingredients for the lasagna… ;-) Damn, I think we’re out of olive oil. It’ll just have to be the hazelnut then. :-D

“Damhsaí Cúplaí Thír Chonaill/The Couple Dances Of Donegal”

Cairdeas na bhFidiléirí / Donegal Fiddle Music
http://www.donegalfiddlemusic.ie/

"Damhsaí Cúplaí Thír Chonaill/The Couple Dances Of Donegal:
Traditional Music and Dance from Donegal" - DVD
http://www.donegalfiddlemusic.ie/dvd-1.htm

A selection of couple dances from Donegal produced by Cairdeas na bhFidiléirí in conjunction with Scoil Cheoil Frankie Kennedy.

The dances featured on this DVD include: The Highland, The Barndance, The Corn Rigs, Germans, The Mazurka, The Peeler & The Goat, The Palais Glide, Father O’Flynn, The Éire Ó, Shoe The Donkey, The Military Two Step, and The Marine.

The dancers and musicians include Vincent Campbell, Jimmy Campbell, Peter Cambell, Paddy McMenamin, Anne Connaghan, Clement Gallagher, Raphael Meehan, Bríd Uí Dhomhnaill, Eithne Ní Dhomhnaill, Aidan O’Donnell, Danny Meehan, Jimmy Meehan, Rosabell Kerrigan, Eamonn Monaghan, Cití Seán Ua Chuinneagáin, Damhsóirí Theach Jack, Anna Ní Chuinneagáin, Anna Uí Chasaide, Nora Ní Chasaide, Seán Con Johnny Ó Beirne, Thomas Cunningham, Ciarán Ó Maonaigh, Máirtín Ó Dúgáin, Máire Mhic Pháidín, Packie Doohan, Veronica Doohan, Grace Anne Brady, Mícheál Brady, Caitlín Brady, Madge O’ Grady, Séamus McCarry, Madge McCarry…


Producer: Ciarán Ó Maonaigh
Director: Eoghan Mac Giolla Bhríde



Discussion: “Damhsaí Cúplaí Thír Chonaill” ~ Brilliant!!!
# Posted by ceolachan - May 8th, 2009 8-)
http://thesession.org/discussions/21517

Now I can return to my early morning tipple of Redbreast. :-)

“Dances of Donegal”, collected by Grace Orpen, 1931 ~ The Dances

( - - - 6-Hand Reels - - - )

The Fairy Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 10, 11
http://thesession.org/tunes/424

Six Handed Duke .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 12, 13
http://thesession.org/tunes/385

( - - - 4-Hand Reels - - - )

The Irish Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 14, 15
http://thesession.org/tunes/2549

A Trip to the Cottage .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 16, 17
http://thesession.org/tunes/70

"Strasperry" Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 18, 19
http://thesession.org/tunes/75

The Irish National, or "Petticoat Swish" .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 20, 21
http://thesession.org/tunes/101

The Waves of Tory .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 22, 23
http://thesession.org/tunes/1232

( - - - Circle Mixers - - - )

Six Handed Reel .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 24
http://thesession.org/tunes/317

The "Pin" Dance .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 25
http://thesession.org/tunes/6334

( - - - Couple Dances - - - )

Shoe the Donkey .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 26
http://thesession.org/tunes/13745

Military Two-Step .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .27
http://thesession.org/tunes/1080

The Highland .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 28
http://thesession.org/tunes/5418

The Barn Dance .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 29
http://thesession.org/tunes/3357

The Corn Rigs .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 30
http://thesession.org/tunes/1936

Berlin Polky .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .31
http://thesession.org/tunes/1133