Out On The Beach waltz

Out On The Beach has been added to 20 tunebooks.

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Four settings

X: 1
T: Out On The Beach
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D2|D4 GA|B4 AG|A4 E2|G4 FE|D4 GA|B4 AG|A6-|A4 D2|
D4 GA|B4 AG|A4 E2|G4 FE|D4 B2|D4 A2|G6-|G4||
d2|d4 B2|d4 B2|d6|B4 e2|e4 c2|G4 A2|d6-|d4 D2|
D4 GA|B4 AG|A4 E2|G4 FE|D4 B2|D4 A2|G6-|G4||
ABC
X: 2
T: Out On The Beach
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
G2 |G4 cd | e4 dc | d4 A2 | c4 BA | G4 cd | e4 dc | d6- | d4 G2 |
G4 cd | e4 dc | d4 A2 | c4 BA | G4 e2 | G4 d2 | c6- | c4 ||
g2 |g4 e2 | g4 e2 | g6 | e4 a2 | a4 f2 | c4 d2 | g6- | g4 G2 |
G4 cd | e4 dc | d4 A2 | c4 BA | G4 e2 | G4 d2 | c6- | c4 |]
ABC
X: 3
T: Out On The Beach
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
A2 |A4 de | f4 ed | e4 B2 | d4 cB | A4 de | f4 ed | e6- | e4 A2 |
A4 de | f4 ed | e4 B2 | d4 cB | A4 f2 | A4 e2 | d6- | d4 ||
a2 |a4 f2 | a4 f2 | a6 | f4 b2 | b4 g2 | d4 e2 | a6- | a4 A2 |
A4 de | f4 ed | e4 B2 | d4 cB | A4 f2 | A4 e2 | d6- | d4 |]
ABC
X: 4
T: Out On The Beach
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D2 |D2 G2 A2 | B2 Bc BG | A3 B AG | E3 G G/F/E | D3 G GA | B2 d2 G2 | A6- | A4 GE |
D2 G2 A2 | B2 Bc BG | A3 B AG | E3 G FE | D2 G2 B2 | D2 F3 A | G6- | G4 ||
Bc |d4 B2 | d4 B2 | d6 | B4 e2 | e3 c Gc | EG AE GE | d6- | d3 G G/F/E |
D2 G2 A2 | B2 A2 G2 | A4 E2 | G4 G/F/E | D2 G2 B2 | D2 F2 D2 | G6- | G4 |]
P: variations on the first 8 bars of B-part
[| Bc |dB GB dB | dB GB dB | d3 B GF | G2 B2 d2 |\
e3 c (3Gcd | eG AE GE | d3 B (3GFE | D3 G (3GFE |]
ABC

Thirteen comments

Hamabe no Uta

This song air was composed by a Japanese man called Keizo Narita in 1916. It’s now in the public domain. The original title actually means "A Song of the Beach," but I find it really boring. IMO the new one I forged sounds more Irish.

I believe it was intentionally written in the style of Scottish airs. In the age of Westernisation, many Scottish song melodies became popular in Japan. Well, some of them are still commonly heard in this country: most of the department stores play "Auld Lang Syne" just before closing; many traffic lights play "Comin’ thro’ the Rye" for blind people; and I sometimes hear my mum humming "Loch Lomond." Those songs surely sounded attractive to Japanese people at that time, but that was not because they come from a technologically and culturally advanced country called Great Britain, but because they are amazingly similar to traditional Japanese folk songs and tunes. Then, quite a few Japanese musicians penned Scottish-sounding songs so that they could show the understanding of both European and Japanese musical traditions.

As far as I know, this is the best among all the Scottish-sounding Japanese song melodies. I hate the lyrics, but the tune sounds right on the flute.

I actually played this when I had a mini session with Mr. and Mrs. Ptarmigan in Ballycastle, and they enjoyed it. And I was going to give this to "Ceolachan," but forgot to do that. I gave him a proper Scottish pipe tune instead.

Hope many people enjoy it on various instruments.

Hey Kieran, what do you mean by - ""Auld Lang Syne" … "Comin’ thro’ the Rye" … "Loch Lomond" - "…but that was not because they come from a technologically and culturally advanced country called Great Britain"

Aaaaaarrrrrg! What do you mean Gt. Britain.
Hoots mon the noo - they’re SCOTTISH tunes!

:-)

But seriously, thanks for the tune.
You can be sure it will be played on Fiddle & Harp in the Glasgow household, very soon.

Yes, words like "technologically and culturally advanced" and "Great Britain" should be in quotation marks.

You’re welcome, Mr. Glasgow of Edinburgh!

Nice little simple tune but it’s nothing special on the banjo. Sounds better on my mandola and probably even more so on the whistle. Thanks!

Paddy, why not try it on the harpsichord?

Seriously, I won’t post any more Japanese tune. You may play this after tunes like Inisheer.

Japanese-Scottish my *** ~ git along little doggies ~ YeeHa! ~

Put that cowboy hat and those snakeskin boots and gold spurs and that pearl button silk shirt and those pinto-leather chaps back in the cupboard. This is altogether Nashville sounding to me… Are your real inclinations and inspirations showing through? I bet you’re a John Wayne and Grand Ol’ Oprey fan. Let’s get the steel guitar out… ;-)

K: C Major ~ this is one direction you could take with it so you can practice half-holing the f-nat… This is the key I first found myself playing it in… This is a direct transposition from your notes…

G2 |
G4 cd | e4 dc | d4 A2 | c4 BA | G4 cd | e4 dc | d6- | d4 G2 |
G4 cd | e4 dc | d4 A2 | c4 BA | G4 e2 | G4 d2 | c6- | c4 ||
g2 |
g4 e2 | g4 e2 | g6 | e4 a2 | a4 f2 | c4 d2 | g6- | g4 G2 |
G4 cd | e4 dc | d4 A2 | c4 BA | G4 e2 | G4 d2 | c6- | c4 ||

K: D Major ~ if you like it a bit brighter…another direct transposition, not fooling around…
A2 |
A4 de | f4 ed | e4 B2 | d4 cB | A4 de | f4 ed | e6- | e4 A2 |
A4 de | f4 ed | e4 B2 | d4 cB | A4 f2 | A4 e2 | d6- | d4 ||
a2 |
a4 f2 | a4 f2 | a6 | f4 b2 | b4 g2 | d4 e2 | a6- | a4 A2 |
A4 de | f4 ed | e4 B2 | d4 cB | A4 f2 | A4 e2 | d6- | d4 ||

~ now some fooling around back in your key for it, a few places where I went with it at times, spured on by you:

D2 |
D2 G2 A2 | B2 Bc BG | A3 B AG | E3 G G/F/E |
D3 G GA | B2 d2 G2 | A6- | A4 GE |
D2 G2 A2 | B2 Bc BG | A3 B AG | E3 G FE |
D2 G2 B2 | D2 F3 A | G6- | G4 ||
Bc |
d4 B2 | d4 B2 | d6 | B4 e2 |
e3 c Gc | EG AE GE | d6- | d3 G G/F/E |
D2 G2 A2 | B2 A2 G2 | A4 E2 | G4 G/F/E |
D2 G2 B2 | D2 F2 D2 | G6- | G4 ||

I was doing a lot of crazy stuff with the first four bars of the B-part but nothing would settle down, maybe later when I’ve a bit better control on the push and pull of it… It loves double stops too…

Still having fun with this ~ the B-part:

Bc |
dB GB dB | dB GB dB | d3 B GF | G2 B2 d2 |
e3 c (3Gcd | eG AE GE | d3 B (3GFE | D3 G (3GFE | ~

This also works in the larger frame of a waltz, or 54 bars, repeating the two parts AABB, each part being as given, 16 bars in length… And it works with ‘swing’ too ~ > ~ !

Damn, how did that ‘5’ get there, I meant ‘64’ bars/measures…

Composer Correction

Slight correction: the attribution of the song to "Keizo Narita" is a bit mangled. The tune was composed in 1916 by *Tamezoo* Narita to fit a poem published in 1913 by Kokei Hayashi. I think it’s a charming tune and have played it followed on by the jig "Rolling Waves" with good results.

I stand corrected. I’m obviously forgetting how to read Chinese characters.

X: 4

# Posted by ceolachan - April 12th, 2006