March Of The Kings Of Laois jig

Also known as Cumha Dhonnachadh Mhic Iain, Cumha Donnchadh Mhic Iain, King Of Laois, The King Of Laois, The King Of Laoise, The King Of Leix, The Kings Of Laois, The Kings Of Laoise, The Kings Of Leix, Lament For Duncan Macrae Of Kintail, Máirseáil Rí Laoise, March Of The High Kings, March Of The King Of Laois, The March Of The King Of Laois, March Of The King Of Laoise, March Of The King Of Leix, March Of The Kings Of Laoise, March Of The Kings Of Leix, Rauiri Og O Mordha, Ri Laois, Rory O Moore’s, Rory Of The Hills, Ruaidhri Na Cnoch, Ruairí Óg Ó Mórdha, Ruiari Og O Mordha.

There are 25 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with Paddy’s (a few times).

March Of The Kings Of Laois has been added to 299 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: March Of The Kings Of Laois
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmix
A2F A2D|A2F A2D|B2G A2F|G2F E>FG|
A2F A2D|A2F A2d|B2d A>dG|F>dF E2D|F>ED G>FE|
A3 A>GF|E>cG E>CE|G>cG E>CE|D>ED D>ED|D>ED D3:|
|:B2G d2G|B>AG d2G|A2d A2d|F2d A>dA|
B2d d>BA|G>FG E>FG|F>ED G>AB|A3 AGF|
E>cG E>CE|G>cG E>CE|D>ED D>ED|D>ED D3:|
ABC
X: 2
T: March Of The Kings Of Laois
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
[|e2c e2A|e2c e2A|f2d e2c|d2c B2A|
|e2c e2A|e2c e2a|f2a e>ad|c>ac B2A||c2A d>ef|
|e3 e>dc|B>gd B>GB|d>gd B>GB|A>BA A>BA|A>BA A>BA|
||f2d a2d|f2d a2d|e2a e2c|e2a e2c|
|f2a a>fe|d>gd B>cd|c2A d>cB|e3 e>dc|
|B>gd B>GB|d>gd B>GB|A>BA A>BA|A>BA A>BA|]
ABC
X: 3
T: March Of The Kings Of Laois
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmix
A2F A2D|A2F A2D|B2G A2F|G2F E>FG|
A2F A2D|A2F A2d|B2d A>dG|F>dF E2D|F>ED G>FE|
A3 A>GF|E>cG E3|G>cG E3|D3 D3|D3 D2D:|
|:B2G d2G|B2G d2G|A2d AGF|A2d F2A|
B2d d>BA|G>FG E>FG|F>ED G>AB|A3 AGF|
E>cG E3|G>cG E3|D3 D3|D3 D3:|
# Added by JACKB .
ABC

Eighteen comments

My favorite March

I learned this many years ago off of a Chietan’s recording. I learned how to play it a few years later from my hazy memory. It was far more accurate for me to find a copy of this tune than for me to transcribe it from my memory. This version is probably much closer to the writers version. That would be Rory O’Moore.

Mark

A nice tune for two pipers to play a duet (if they can get their @#$$#^**!! kits in tune!)

Help with a Laois set

I really love The March of the King of Laois as it’s a haunting tune which sets a mystical atmosphere at a session (especially if played slowly with whistle/flute). What suggestions for a tune or two that could go with it in a set? It is actually a jig, but played slowly can be like a march. I have the tune on a number of CDs in my collection, but it’s always a single track. Any ideas?

Also known as Rory O’Moore’s march - you could try playing it with the O’Sullivan’s march (also another great melody). However, from my experience marches are usually played on their own rather than in sets.

It’s a Scottish tune but, on Smiddyburn/Flittin, Swarbrick couples it with Nathaniel Gow’s Lament on the Death of his Brother.

Playing with another tune

i play this tune on highland pipes… i lead into it with "she moved through the fair", slow like, then into a slow 6/8 for march of king laois

March Of The King Of Laois

Part of this tune is identical with part of "Washington’s March", a tune from the c17 Playford collection, which I intend to submit into the database in its own right.

March of the King of Laois

This tune is kind of weird having 14 bars in part A and 12 bars in part B. Is this right? It’s a nice tune. Might go good in a set with Gary Owens.

great recording of this tune by Kips Bay Ceili Band from NYC (with accordian player John Whelan)

btw, I play this on Highland Pipes,
along with the Italian Bagpipe tune Carol of the Bagpipers,

55 43 2 1 1 23 45 432 2 32 32 3456 54 3 43 21 1
etc…

those 2 tunes go together seamlessly at a nice slow 6/8 march tempo

I also played it a bit faster recently for the St. Patrick’s Day Parade here in Beijing, China, 2008
yeah, I’m not kidding, it happened…

its also known in Scotland as "Lament for Duncan Macrae of Kintail", an unorthodox piobaireachd found in the Killbery book. Allan Macdonald of Glenuig does a great job of it

Allan MacDonald

Here is Allan MacDonald’s setting of the tune. Here he plays it along with Lament for Duncan Macrae of Kintail. Just beautiful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XB9FxF2fAeU


X: 1
T: March Of The King Of Laois
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Amix
[|e2c e2A|e2c e2A|f2d e2c|d2c B2A|
|e2c e2A|e2c e2a|f2a e>ad|c>ac B2A||c2A d>ef|
|e3 e>dc|B>gd B>GB|d>gd B>GB|A>BA A>BA|A>BA A>BA|
||f2d a2d|f2d a2d|e2a e2c|e2a e2c|
|f2a a>fe|d>gd B>cd|c2A d>cB|e3 e>dc|
|B>gd B>GB|d>gd B>GB|A>BA A>BA|A>BA A>BA|]

March Of The King Of Laois

Nice setting above. Nice clip till the bampot with the washboard started up followed by the poor toy whistle playing.

Ruairí Óg Ó Mórdha

For any history buffs wondering about the title, Ruairí Óg Ó Mórdha was the King of Laois. He had over 180 members of his family killed by the English at a feast in Kildare in 1577 and became a lifelong enemy of Queen Elizabeth I. His son Ruairí Ó Mórdha was the principle organizer of the 1641 rebellion, and his grandson was James Moore, California’s first govenor. There is a Rory O’Moore bridge in Dublin.

Quick historical correction

James Moore was not the first governor of California, that was Peter Burnett. Furthermore, as California was not a state until 1850, it’s doubtful there were many grandchildren of people from the mid-17th century around then. It seems you’re talking about the 13th governor of the South Carolina colony, who held office from 1700 to 1703.