La Russe polka

Also known as La Rousse, La Rousse Quadrille, La Russe Quadrille, The La Russe Quadrille.

There are 4 recordings of a tune by this name.

La Russe has been added to 17 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Eight settings

X: 1
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G |:GB/B/ Bd/d/ | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB/B/ Bd/d/ | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG G2 :|[2 AG G>B ||
K: Dmaj
|: Ad d/d/c/B/ | Aa a/a/f/f/ | gf g/g/e/e/ | f/f/e/c/ d/d/c/B/ |
Ad dc/B/ | Aa af | gf ge |[1 d2 dc/B/ :|[2 d2 F2 |]
ABC
X: 2
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
M: 4/4
G2 |:G2 BB B2 dd | d2 g2 g2 fg | a2 g2 e2 c2 | e2 d2 dcBA |
G2 BB B2 dd | d2 g2 g2 fg | e2 d2 d2 F2 |[1 A2 G2 G4 :|[2 A2 G2 G3 B ||
K: Dmaj
|: A2 d2 ddcB | A2 a2 aaff | g2 f2 ggee | ffec ddcB |
A2 d2 d2 cB | A2 a2 a2 f2 | g2 f2 g2 e2 |[1 d4 d2 cB :|[2 d4 F4 |]
ABC
X: 3
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G/G/| GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG GG/G/ :|[2 AG GA |
|: Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ fe|e | f/g/a/g/ f/e |
Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ fe |[1 d2 dA:|[2 d2 d/c/B/A ||
ABC
X: 4
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G/G/ |: GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG GG/G/ :|[2 AG GA |
|: Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ ge | f/g/a/g/ fA |
Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ "g|[1 d2 dA :|[2 d3/2e/ d/c/B/A/ ||
ABC
X: 5
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G/G/ |: GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG GG/G/ :|[2 AG GA |
|: Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ ge | f/g/a/g/ fA |
Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ ge |[1 d2 dA :|[2 d3/2e/ d/c/B/A/ ||
ABC
X: 6
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: GB/B/ Bd/d/ | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB/B/ Bd/d/ | dg gf/g/ | ed dF | AG G2 :|
K: Dmaj
|: Ad dc/B/ | Aa af | g>f ge | f/g/a/g/ f/e/d/B/ |
Ad/d/ dc/B/ | Aa af | g>f ge | d4 :|
ABC
X: 7
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: B/A/ |G>B Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg g2 | ed dF | AG G :|
|: A |Ad dc/B/ | Aa af | g>f ge | f/g/a/g/ fA/A/ |
Ad/d/ dB/B/ | Aa/a/ a>f | g>f ge | d3 :|
N: # Added by ceolachan - September 26th, 2008
ABC
X: 8
T: La Russe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
M: 4/4
D2 |:G2 BB B2 dd | d2 g2 g2 fg | a2 g2 e2 c2 | e2 d2 dcBA |
G2 B/B/B B2 d/d/d | d2 g2 g2 fg | e2 d2 d2 FB |[1 A2 G2 G2 D/E/F :|[2 A2 G2 G3 ||
K: Dmaj
|: B |A2 d2 d3 B | A2 a2 a3 f | g2 f2 g2 e2 | fgag f2 d2 |
A2 d/d/d d2 cB | A2 aa a2 f2 | g2 f2 g2 e2 |[1 d4 d3 B :|[2 d2 de dcBA |]
N: # Added by ceolachan - September 29th, 2008
ABC

Thirty-one comments

“La Russe” ~ tune & dance

I’ve stumbled across this one in several places, geographically and put to various dance purposes… It is sometimes also notated as 4/4. This notation is taken from recordings of melodeon player Bob Cann. Hopefully other transcriptions, for comparison, will collect here and I will try to remember to return with at least one other offering some other possibilities…

I was sure I had at least one recording of it somewhere on file as played in Ireland, having come across it in the North/Ulster, and elsewhere around that isle. I’ll keep looking…

It was also played in Cymru / Wales…

Harry Bradley and Teada recorded a similar tune. I’m not sure whether they play it as a polka or a march.

[1 ~ apologies, a lost ending, now corrected on the ABCs

Slainte ~ Harry eh, I’d love to see a transcription of that, and from Teada. Which albums?

“La Russe”

This melody/dance did the rounds. I’d also be interested in what alternate names Harry and Teada had for this, as well as their take and style on it…

I’ve got a good name for it. It’s spelled "D-A-G".

This daggy tune is often used in Dashing White sets.

Rooskies, Wodkah & Samovars

Right you are Donald, nor does it end there…

I see the DAG King has made comment too… 8-)

As always, it’s never the fault of the tune, it’s who’s drivin’ it…

I actually quite like this tune. It’s probably the key change, especially going back to G for the A part.

Though I wouldn’t play it as presented here - it’s got too many sixteenth notes which tends to mask the inherent melodic rhythm.

DAG is in the eye of the beholder… 8-)

It’s a transcription of someone else’s playing of it. I was hoping others would offer their take on it here in the comments, and I’ve other transcriptions I may also add…

What would the world be without DAG tunes to balance things out, eh?

Come on Donald, give us a transcription, and Slainte. I’ll match you with another if you do… ;-)

The transcription above was minimal, just some of the melodic treatment, just notes and minus any other twiddles and points of well chosen short silences…

A-part ~ 4/4 ~ & 2/4 a little bit simplified (no endings)

That said, the version of the A-part given is pretty typical, including those sixteenth notes. As said, some transcribe this as 4/4, which would make those 1/8 notes…

X: 1
T: La Russe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: polka
K: Gmaj
G2 |:
G2 BB B2 dd | d2 g2 g2 fg | a2 g2 e2 c2 | e2 d2 dcBA |
G2 BB B2 dd | d2 g2 g2 fg | e2 d2 d2 F2 |[1 A2 G2 G4 :|[2 A2 G2 G3 B ||
K: Dmaj
|: A2 d2 ddcB | A2 a2 aaff | g2 f2 ggee | ffec ddcB |
A2 d2 d2 cB | A2 a2 a2 f2 | g2 f2 g2 e2 |[1 d4 d2 cB :|[2 d4 F4 |]

& slightly simplified ~

X: 2
T: La Russe
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
R: polka
K: Gmaj
|: GB/B/ Bd/d/ | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB/B/ Bd/d/ | dg gf/g/ | ed dF | AG G2 :|
K: Dmaj
|: Ad dc/B/ | Aa af | g>f ge | f/g/a/g/ f/e/d/B/ |
Ad/d/ dc/B/ | Aa af | g>f ge | d4 :|

Sorry, c, was away doing the housework!
I would normally expect to hear something like:

X: 3
T: La Russe
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: G
G/G/| GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG GG/G/ :|[2 AG GA |
|: Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ fe|e | f/g/a/g/ f/e |
Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ fe |[1 d2 dA:|[2 d2 d/c/B/A ||

wich is just like X: 2 above.

Sorry. Complete mess. Should have read:

X: 3
T: La Russe
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: G
G/G/ |: GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG GG/G/ :|[2 AG GA |
|: Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ ge | f/g/a/g/ fA |
Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ "g|[1 d2 dA :|[2 d3/2e/ d/c/B/A/ ||

or even:
X: 34
T: La Russe
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
Q: 1/4=120
K: G
G/G/ |: GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg gf/g/ | ed dF |[1 AG GG/G/ :|[2 AG GA |
|: Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ ge | f/g/a/g/ fA |
Ad dB | Aa af | g3/2f/ ge |[1 d2 dA :|[2 d3/2e/ d/c/B/A/ ||

La Russe

I’ve seen it called the La Russe Quadrille but I can’t see any connection with anything Russian. When we serve food already on plates rather than buffet fashion it is called a la Russe. Thought I’d throw that in!

“La Russe” ~ thanks Donald, here’s another take on yours

X: 666
T: La Russe
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
Q: 1/4=120
K: G
|: B/A/ |\
G>B Bd | dg gf/g/ | ag ec | ed d/c/B/A/ |
GB Bd | dg g2 | ed dF | AG G :|
|: A |\
Ad dc/B/ | Aa af | g>f ge | f/g/a/g/ fA/A/ |
Ad/d/ dB/B/ | Aa/a/ a>f | g>f ge | d3 :|

But I like your second ending for the B-part, leading back to the A-part ~
[2 d>e d/c/B/A/ ||: GB Bd | ~

Yes hotspur, so have I, and even just called ‘Quadrille’…

Kate Hughes’ “Dancing Book” ~ Dundalk, 1867

http://chrisbrady.itgo.com/dance/dundalk/dundalk.htm

La Russe (the above)
1.) All the gents set and turn the ladie on the right (8)
2.) Set and turn the ladie on the left (8)
3.) Set and turn partners (8)
4.) Top couple Lead in (8)
5.) Top Couple Poussette in (8)
6.) Top and Bottom change Change Places, Bottom open up (8)
7.) Back to Places, Top open up (8)
8.) repeat 6 and 7 (16)
9.) Eight hands half round and turn Partners (8)
10.) Poussette to Places (8)

“Kickin’ Up The Sawdust” ~ the dance description given in the notes:

1.) La Russe (La Russe / Cadum Woods / Bluebell Polka)

Form: Square sets of four couples. Couples numbered round anti-clockwise, first couple with backs to (music) record player! Woman on man’s right.

A1 (Bars 1 - 8) Men move behind partners to women on right, who move to meet them.
A 11 balance and swing.
A2 (9 - 16) Men return to partners, balance and swing.

B1 (1 - 8) First couple swings.
B2 (9 - 16) First couple promenades insidethe set back to place.
A3 (1 - 8) First couple cross over with opposite couple (passing in between). Partners change places. Cross back in same way (opposite couple passing in between).
A4 (9 - 16) Repeat cross-over figure.
B3 (1 - 8) All join hands and circle left.
B4 (9-16) Promenade partners to places anti-clockwise.

Movements are then repeated, each couple in turn leading.

“La Russe” ~ Kate Hughes’ “Dancing Book” ~ Dundalk, 1867

~ I missed the conclusion to this dance description ~

"(?unclear?) ~ by the other couples"

(This would be saying that each couple then perform the dance in their turn.)

"Finish with all Promenade…"

“La Russe” ~ ‘The High Level Ranters’

The following transcription is to show some of what these lads do with it. I’ve also transcribed it in 4/4 in order to avoid ~ | GB/4B/4B/ Bd/4d/4d/ | ~ which in 4/4 reads as ~ | G2 B/B/B B2 d/d/d | ~

X: 5
T: La Russe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: polka
K: Gmaj
D2 |:\
G2 BB B2 dd | d2 g2 g2 fg | a2 g2 e2 c2 | e2 d2 dcBA |
G2 B/B/B B2 d/d/d | d2 g2 g2 fg | e2 d2 d2 FB |[1 A2 G2 G2 D/E/F :|[2 A2 G2 G3 ||
K: Dmaj
|: B |\
A2 d2 d3 B | A2 a2 a3 f | g2 f2 g2 e2 | fgag f2 d2 |
A2 d/d/d d2 cB | A2 aa a2 f2 | g2 f2 g2 e2 |[1 d4 d3 B :|[2 d2 de dcBA |]

Arches

I have occaisionally danced to it in Dublin. I think it was Matt Cuningham playing it … I think the Abbey might have it in their repertoir.

Re the ‘Kicking up the Sawdust’ notation … the crossing over I have only danced it with the outside couple making an arch - show-offs in Leyland did double arches and twirls, the side couples joining in the cross-over while the active couple were twirling. You’ve got to be nippy

Thanks Alan, like with subtle and not so subtle connections between tunes, I enjoy those same kind of relationships between dances of the same root(s)…

La Russe

Have just joined the session and was intrigued to see this tune described as polka. Is this the same tune that is often played as a reel for Petronella/ Eightsome Reel etc in Scotland? The spelling is different - La Rousse.

La Russe

A friend of mine asked me about this tune about a year ago. I thought it was so common, it never occurred to me to post it here. I mean, I was sure it would be here already.

Nearly same title… different tune

In Switzerland, we play the "Russe" (=the Russian), which is the one noted above, and la "Rousse"(the Red-haired girl), which is another tune, coming from the répertoire of Pipes (piccolo flutes)and Drums of St Luc, a village in a remote valley of the Alps. It’s in a mode of F, that would be Lydian, major with an augmented fourth. It’s the one recorded on the Montferrine CD…

ps The Swiss Rousse is in 3/8 beat…