The Irish Washerwoman jig

Also known as Corporal Casey, Do Virgins Taste Better?.

There are 65 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with Father O’Flynn (lots of times), The Jig Of Slurs (lots of times), Haste To The Wedding (a few times), The Atholl Highlanders (a few times), The Blackberry Blossom (a few times).

The Irish Washerwoman has been added to 1,213 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Fifteen settings

X: 1
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cAA EAA|cAc edc|
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
|:BGG DGG|BGB BAG|AFF DFF|AFA AGF|
EGG DGG|CGG B,GG|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
ABC
X: 2
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
g f# g G B d | g f# g b a g | f# e f# F# A d | f# e f# a g f# |
ABC
X: 3
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:dc|BAB DGB|DGB dcB|cBc EGc|EGc edc|
|BAB DGB|DGB dcB|1 cBc ed^c| dfa g:|2 cBc BGB|AFA G||
|:ef|gfg Bdg|Bdg bag|fef Adf|Adf agf|
|gbg faf|gfe dBG|cBc BGB|AFA G:||
# Added by davy .
ABC
X: 4
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
a | fdd Add | fdf agf | gee cee |Ace gfe |
fdd Add | fdf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2 :|
a | fdd add | fdd agf | gfg ece |Ace gfe |
fdd add | fdd agf | gfg eag |fdd d2a |
fdd add | fdd agf | gfg ece |Ace gfe |
f<af dcd | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2||
a | faf dcd | Adf agf | gfg ece |Ace gfe |
faf dcd | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2 :|
e | f2f agf | Adf agf | e2e gfe |Ace gfe |
f2f agf | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdc d2e |
f2f agf | Adf agf | e2e gfe |Ace gfe |
faf dcd | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2 |]
ABC
X: 5
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
A|~B2 G DGB|DGB dcB|~cBc ~EAc|~EAc ~edc|
~B3 DGB|DGB ~dcB|~cBc BGB|~BAF ~G2 A||
BAB DGB|~DGB dcB|~c3 ~E3|~c3 edc|
~B2 G DGB|DGB dcB|cBc ~BGB|~BAF ~G2 g||
gfg Bdg|~Bdg bag|~f3 Adf|~Adf agf|
~gbg faf|~gfe dBG|~c3 BGB|BAF Gef||
gfg Bdg|Bdg bag|~f3 ~Adf|~Adf agf|
~gbg faf|~gfe dBG|~c3 ed^c|dfa gdc|]
ABC
X: 6
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cAA EAA|cAc edc|
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
|:gdd Bdd|gdg bag|fdd Add|fdf agf|
egg dgg|cgg BgB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
ABC
X: 7
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: BGG DGG | BGB dcB | cAA EAA | cA/B/c edc |
BG/G/G DG/G/G | BG/A/B dcB | c>Bc Adc | BGG G3 :|
BGG DGG | BGB BAG | AFF DFF | AF/G/A AGF |
EGG DGG | CGG B,GG | c>Bc Adc | BGG G3 |
gdd Bdd | gdg bag | fdd Add | fd/e/f agf |
egg dgg | cgg BgB | c>Bc Adc | BGG G3 |]
ABC
X: 8
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: E/F/GA |B2 G D2 G | B^AB dcB | c2 A E2 A | cA/B/c edc |
BGG DGG | BG/A/B dcB | c>Bc Adc | BGG :|
|: GB/c/d |gfg GB/c/d | gfg bge | f^ef FAd | fef afd |
egg d2 g | cgg B^AB | cBc Adc | BGG :|
ABC
X: 9
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Amin
cAA EAA|cAc edc|dBB GBB|dBd fed|
cAA EAA|cAc edc|d^cd Bed|1 cAA Aed:|2 cAA A2e||
|:aee cee|aea c'ba|gdd Bdd|gdg bag|
faa eaa|daa caa|d^cd Bed|1 cAA A2e:|2 cAA Aed||
cAA EAA|~c3 edc|dBB GBB|~d3 fed|
cAA EAA|cAc edc|~d3 Bed|1 cAA Aed:|2 cAA A2e||
|:aee cee|~a2b c'ba|gdd Bdd|gdg bag|
faa eaa|daa ~c3|~d3 Bed|1 cAA A2e:|2 cAA Aed||
ABC
X: 10
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|: B |cAA E2 A | cAc edc | BGG DGG | BGB dcB |
cAA EAA | cA/B/c e2 f | gfg dcB | cA^G A2 :|
K: Amin
|: d |cee Aee | cea c’ba | gdd Gdd | gdg ba^g |
faa e2 a | daa c2 a | dfe dcB | cA^G A2 :|
ABC
X: 11
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
d2c|BGB dGB|DGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|cgc Adc|BGG G2 c|
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dBG|c (3cBc Adc|BGG G2 g||
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
g2 a fdg|ecA dBG|c (3cBc Adc|BGG G3|
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
g2 a fdg|ecA dBG|cBc ABc|dfa gdc||
(AB) G DGG|BGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|c2 E Adc|BGG g2 c||
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|cgc Adc|BGG G2 g||
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
g2 a fdg|ecA dBG|c (3cBc Adc|BGG G3|
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
gga fdg|ecA dBG|ccc ABc|dfa gdc||
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dBG|c2E Adc|B[GB][GB] [G3B3]|]
ABC
X: 12
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
dc|:"G"BGG DGG|BGB dcB|"Am"cAA EAA|cAc "D"edc|
"G"BGG DGG|BGB dcB|"Am"cBc "D"Adc|[1"G"BGG Gdc:|[2"G"BGG Gga|]
|:"G"bgg dgg|bgb bag|"D"aff dff|afa agf|
"C"egg "G"dgg|"C"cgg "G"B2B|"Am"cBc "D"Adc|[1"G"BGG Gga:|[2"G"BGG G3|]
# Added by Bryce .
ABC
X: 13
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:FDD ADD|FDF AGF|GEE BEE|GEG BAG|
FDD ADD|FDF AGF|GFG EAG|FDD D3:|
|:dAd dAd|dAd fed|cAc cAc|cAc edc|
Bdd Add| Gdd F2F|GFG EAG|1FDD D2A:|2FDD D2E||
# Added by JACKB .
ABC
X: 14
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cAA EAA|cAc edc|
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
|:gdg gdg|gdg bag|fdf fdf|fdf agf|
egg dgg| cgg B2B|cBc Adc|1BGG G2d:|2BGG G2A||
|:BGG D3|BGB dcB|cAA E3|cAc edc|
BGG D3|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
|:g3 gdg|gdg bag|f3 fdf|fdf agf|
e2g d2g| cBg B2B|cBc Adc|1BGG G2d:|2BGG G2A||
# Added by JACKB .
ABC
X: 15
T: The Irish Washerwoman
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:FDD ADD|FDF AGF|GEE BEE|GEG BAG|
FDD ADD|FDF AGF|GFG EAG|FDD D3:|
|:dAd dAd|dAd fed|cAc cAc|cAc edc|
Bdd Add| Gdd F2F|GFG EAG|1FDD D2A:|2FDD D2E||
|:FDD A3|FDF AGF|GEE B3|G3 BAG|
FDD A3|FDF AGF|G3 EAG|FDD D3:|
|:d3 dAd|dAd fed|c3 cAc|cAc edc|
B2d A2d| GFd F2F|GFG EAG|1FDD D2A:|2FDD D2E||
# Added by JACKB .
ABC

Fifty-two comments

This is one of the most well-known Irish jigs. It’s still a lot of fun to play.

I’ve shown the second part here in the same octave as the first part. For variation, you can play the second part transposed one ocatve higher. In fact, if you’re a whistle player, you’ll probably have to do this anyway.

Alternate melody?

I’ve heard the first 4 bars of the second half played like this:

g f# g G B d | g f# g b a g | f# e f# F# A d | f# e f# a g f# |

This is a lot of fun to do on the flute.

Listen to the version on Two Gentlemen of Clare if you want to suddenly hear that hidden note — it transformed this often-massacred tune for me.

In one of the Ed Reavy tune collections, his son writes that Mr. Reavy couldn’t bear the name of this tune, as he thought it was vulgar and pandered to stereotypes; Mr. Reavy always called it "The Irish Woman"! :)

Zina

Irish Washerwoman

Does anyone have some history about the source and/or/composer of this jig? Some say it was written for a London ballad opera in the early 1700s. Anyone know the name of that opera? Storyline? Ect?

The Finnish ringtone version

I have used to hear this tune as a cellphone ringtone version I once ordered to my phone. It is quite different from this sheetmusic version of yours but I have to admit I like the ringtone version better. I think it has kind of a swing in it :)
You can go and listen to the other version here:
http://www.jippii.fi/club/gsm/search/?key=fitone&target=title&query=the+irish+washerwoman
(Just click that little gray button there and the audio file should play.)
Tell me which one do you like more?

Donegal Version

Here’s the Version played by John Gallagher on "The Donegal Fiddle" I prefer it to the standard - maybe it’s the Finnish Ringtone (which I haven’t heard)
|:dc|BAB DGB|DGB dcB|cBc EGc|EGc edc|
|BAB DGB|DGB dcB|1 cBc ed^c| dfa g:|2 cBc BGB|
AFA G|| |:ef|gfg Bdg|Bdg bag|fef Adf|Adf agf|
|gbg faf|gfe dBG|cBc BGB|AFA G:||

Posted by .

Need help: Bowing on the “The Irish washerwoman”

Hi!

First, Im new to "The session" and I would just like to say that I’m glad to have found such a informative site, with a forum filled with nice and helpful people!

My problem is with the second part of "The Irish washerwoman"…
I just can’t seem to get the bowing right on the part that goes: /EGG DGG/ CGG BGG/

My problem is to get the two G’s nice and staccato, it is really frustrating because it sounds so easy but I find it quite difficult to do in rythm.

Any advice would be most helpful :-)

Regards

Vidar Tilrem

Re: Need help: Bowing on the “The Irish washerwoman”

… normally new members mentioning the irish washer woman are punished by sending him/her to Coventry …

… but well: first thing: play it slow. I mean really slow - slo mo slow (but with accurate beat). try on these GGs rolls, triplets or other ornamentations and play just this phrase back and forth for a while. and always remember: sloooow. ten minutes a day slow played irish washerwoman for one week. after that you might speed up again and you

Re: Need help: Bowing on the “The Irish washerwoman”

Try emphasising the 1st and 4th notes of each - each note that isn’t g, while playing slowly as Crannog says. Jigs always need this kind of rhythm anyway, and you’re probably doing it already, just be aware of it. Hope it’ll help.

Re: Need help: Bowing on the “The Irish washerwoman”

I can do you a scan of the sheet music with bowing and accents written in. Interested? Then reply on this thread an I’ll email it you.

Jim

Re: Need help: Bowing on “The Irish washerwoman

Thank you all for taking the time to answer my question!

Coventry sounds nice…didn’t get the reason why I should be sent there, though:-)

Jim, sheetmusic with indicated bowing would be most welcome, that’s very nice of you!

Regards

Vidar Tilrem

Coventry?

"sending sb. to Coventry" = "punish sb. by ignoring him/her" …

Re: Coventry?

Why should I be ignored?

Is it not "allowed" to play and ask questions about this tune?

In that case excuse me…

Regards

Vidar Tilrem

Vidar, I don’t think anyone was ignoring you, really, for instance, Crannog was answering you, so it’s rather snifty of *you* to ignore *him*, yes? *grin* Also, keep in mind that sometimes people just miss posts, or don’t have any real input into someone’s question, it’s not a question of being ignored.

The reason that The Irish Washerwoman isn’t particularly played out much is because it has become something of a cliched tune — if someone wants an Irish sounding tune, out trots the Irish Washerwoman. People have even made up tons and tons of lyrics (of varying amount of hilarity and wit) to the thing.

So many serious players won’t really play it unless they’re being nice to a beginner who starts it up and they want to be supportive. (And some not even then, I’m afraid.)

And then you get into the whole, I could answer but what if I offend, thing? For instance, my own first thought was "why would you *want* to get the notes staccato and short? Why not play them smooth and long for fun?" But that didn’t seem very helpful. So I didn’t answer.

When you’re first starting out with this stuff, everything is hard, and most of us do remember that. The key is to keep practising until the thing that was hard is easy. To do that, play whatever is giving you problems very slowly, as slowly as you need to go in order to play it well. When it is easy to play it at that speed, ratch up the speed a tiny notch. Do not go faster until it is easy to play it well at that speed. Never jump from one speed to a much higher speed. Always speed up very slowly, if you know what i mean.

Good luck!

Zina

Thanks for the insight Zina:-)

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t mean to imply that I was ignored, I was just wondering why Crannog said that new members would normally be ignored when mentioning this tune.

Living in Norway, there are no Irish sessions to attend to, so the only way I can learn Irish tunes are from Cd’s.

I think that if I asked about this tune at a session, I would get a warning about the "background" of this tune, but Cd’s don’t come with such warnings or comments, so it’s difficult for me to know whether a tune is welcome among other players or not.

Again, I don’t feel ignored at all, you have all been very helpful

Regards

Vidar Tilrem

Lol, this is a fun little one to play around with octaves and etc… especially triplets… We also use it alot for the ‘Irish Jig’ in Highland dance, so yeah… and every piper plays it differently!

The Irish Washerwoman

I’ve heard some lyrics to this—-something about two dead people lying in the same bed but neither knowing the other was dead! Does anyone have the lyrics or know the origin of the lyrics (e.g. famine?)?Thanks,
Steve Warres

Source of the tune

Actually, it WAS written for an English play. The play itself was making fun of Irish people. A very good historically-accurate fifer was telling me all about it some years ago, but I don’t remember details, I’m sorry. But it was meant to be derogatory towards Irishmen, and is not in fact Celtic in origin.

Words to the A part

To answer owarres’s question (two years later, I am afraid), when I was in college, my roommate had a live Don MacLean album (the American folksinger that wrote American Pie) where he sang a little snippet to the A part of this:
"Oh, McTavish is dead and his brother don’t know it,
And his brother is dead, and McTavish don’t know it,
And both of ‘em are dead, and neither one knows it,
‘Cause both of ‘em thinks that the other is dead."
No idea where he got that from, but for some reason it has stuck in my head for 30 years.

The Irish Washerwoman

It turns out this video is discussed in some detail on the Discussions thread "The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!" http://www.thesession.org/discussions/10473.
The fiddle player is, as I was starting to recollect, John Sheehan of The Dubliners.

The Irish Stairway To Heaven

I had a friend describe this tune as the session version of Stairway To Heaven. Great tune that has been played to death!!

Here is a Scottish smallpipe version as played by Ewan Boyd on A Great Highland Bagpipe Tutor CD

T:The Irish Washerwoman
R:Jig
C:Played by Ewan Boyd on A Great Highland Bagpipe Tutor CD (www.bagpipe.co.uk)
Z:Transcribed by Miklos Nemeth reusing extensively an arrangment by P/M Joe Wilson
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:1/4=90
K:Hp
a | fdd Add | fdf agf | gee cee |Ace gfe | fdd Add | fdf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2 :|
a | fdd add | fdd agf | gfg ece |Ace gfe | fdd add | fdd agf | gfg eag |fdd d2a |
fdd add | fdd agf | gfg ece |Ace gfe | f<af dcd | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2||
a | faf dcd | Adf agf | gfg ece |Ace gfe | faf dcd | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2 :|
e | f2f agf | Adf agf | e2e gfe |Ace gfe | f2f agf | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdc d2e |
f2f agf | Adf agf | e2e gfe |Ace gfe | faf dcd | Adf agf | gfg eag |fdd d2 |]

The Irish Washerwoman

The Irish Washerwoman was used in the (excruciating) 1989 pop hit "I’m into folk" by Bart Peter and the Radios.

Irish Waterman

Lazyhound, have a look at this thread over at http://www.thesession.org/tunes/1312 which I think was one of the most hilarious we’ve ever had here on the Yellow Board and always comes to mind whenever the Irish Washerwoman is mentioned.

I have heard people say this was by the 18th-century piper Walker Jackson from Limerick.

Posted by .

Irish Washerwoman - Liz Doherty’s version

Similar to the Donegal version posted by Davy in 2003, with a bit more going on. Transcribed from the first of two times through on Liz Doherty’s 2nd album, Quare Imagination.

X:1
T:Irish Washerwoman, The (Donegal Version)
C:Irish Traditional
S:Liz Doherty "Quare Imagination"
D:Liz Doherty "Quare Imagination"
Z:Gary Martin
R:Jig
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:GMajor
A|~B2 G DGB|DGB dcB|~cBc ~EAc|~EAc ~edc|
~B3 DGB|DGB ~dcB|~cBc BGB|~BAF ~G2 A||
BAB DGB|~DGB dcB|~c3 ~E3|~c3 edc|
~B2 G DGB|DGB dcB|cBc ~BGB|~BAF ~G2 g||
gfg Bdg|~Bdg bag|~f3 Adf|~Adf agf|
~gbg faf|~gfe dBG|~c3 BGB|BAF Gef||
gfg Bdg|Bdg bag|~f3 ~Adf|~Adf agf|
~gbg faf|~gfe dBG|~c3 ed^c|dfa gdc|]

Washerwoman

Try the version in O’Neill’s. A different and lively B

Lyrics

Here are what seems to be the standard version:

When I was at home, I was merry and frisky.
My dad kept a pig, but my mother sold whiskey.
My uncle was rich, but ne’er could be aisey (=easy)
Till I was enlisted by Corporal Casey.
Och, rub-a-dub, row-de-dow, Corporal Casey,
My dear little Shelah I thought would run crazy
When I trudged away with tough Corporal Casey.
Och, rub-a-dub row-de-row, Shelah my love.

I marched from Kilkenny, but as I was thinking
On Shelah, my heart in my bosom was sinking.
But soon I was forced to look fresh as a daisy
For fear of a drubbin’ from Corporal Casey.
Och, rub-a-dub, row-de-dow, Corporal Casey,
The devil go with him. I ne’er could be lazy
He struck my shirts so, old Corporal Casey.
Och, rub-a-dub row-de-row, Shelah my dear.

We went into battle. I took the blows fairly
That fell on my pate but they bothered me rarely.
And who should the first be that dropped? Why, and please you,
It was my good friend, honest Corporal Casey.
Och, rub-a-dub, row-de-dow, Corporal Casey,
Thinks I, “You are quiet and I shall be aisey.”
So eight years I fought without Corporal Casey.
Och, rub-a-dub row-de-row, Shelah my gal.

B part

II always played the B part a octave higher

Posted by .

I agree that this jig is an awful cliché, but I think that the original ABC posting should me fixed, because it’s very wrong.

I suggest :

X: 1
T: Irish Washerwoman, The
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: G
|:BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cAA EAA|cAc edc|
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|
|:gdd Bdd|gdg bag|fdd Add|fdf agf|
egg dgg|cgg BgB|cBc Adc|BGG G3:|

Irish Washerwoman - Lyrics for square-dance calling

I’ve come across a great square-dance call for this jig:

Now all four ladies jump into the middle,
Kickin’ your feet, keep time to the fiddle.
You’re washin’ the clothes, and washin’ ‘em
clean.
It’s a rub-a-dub-dub all around the ring.
Just half way ‘round is as far as you go,
Now swing that gent and don’t be slow.
Go ‘round and around with a high de ho,
Now break that up with a do-paso.
It’s a right to your corner and back to the one,
That you were a swingin’ but you’re not done.
Go back to the center a washin’ again,
It’s a rub-a-dub-dub all around the ring.
Now back to your own and swing him around,
You swing him up and you swing him down.
You hang right on and take no chance,
And swing him again for the good of the dance.

Now all four ladies to the right of the ring,
And meet that gent with a two hand swing,
You swing him right and you swing him wrong,
Then leave him there and go on along.
You meet the next with the same old thing,
Remember girls it’s a two hand swing.
Now swing that gent, he’s a brand new pard,
Swing him around but not too hard.
Now on to the next and don’t be slow,
Hang right on and away you go.
You swing him once and then swing him again,
And then go on to the right of the ring.
Swing that gent, say that’s your own pard,
Swing him around in your own back yard,
Swing that pretty boy ‘round and around,
Right up to the ceiling and don’ come down.

Now all four gents jump into the middle,
Kickin’ your feet, keep time to the fiddle.
You’re out on the farm and pitchin’ the hay,
Around the ring but go only half way.
Now grab onto that girl and don’t be slow,
Hang right on and away you go,
Go ‘round and around with a high de ho,
Then break it up with a do-paso.
It’s a right to your corner and back to the girl,
Swing her again all around the world.
Now after you’ve swung her ‘round and around,
Go back to the center you’re goin’ to town.
Now go back and swing your own pard,
Swing her around but not too hard,
Now you hang right on and take no chance,
And swing her again for the good of the dance.

Each line of the square-dance call corresponds to two measures (bars) of the tune, and the tune is played three times. The call, as a set of instructions, is complete in itself.

The call is by the famous square-dance caller Les Gotcher (1905-1996) of Texas.

Irish Washerwoman

Just joined the group. I play a two row BC with Burke bass. Back in the early 80s I was told that Irish musicians in Boston didn’t play the Irish Washerwoman because it was seen as derogatory to the Irish. Based on one of the comments above I can see why. If you are familiar with Boston, as I am, then you will understand the intense Irish pride there and the fact that a common jig was written in England to poke fun at the Irish is reason enough not to play it under any circumstances.

All the more reason to own it and not take things so seriously. Your only truly free when you can laugh at yourself…

Besides, I suspect that if it ever was used in a play to poke fun at the Irish in any way, quite believable being as some have put it ‘cliché’, that rather than being written for that purpose, for a certain play, that it would have been borrowed, meaning that the jig came before the play, not that the jig was written for the play or for the pupose of denegrating the Irish… Too many Irish have owned it and enjoyed it, even as a cliché. Just enjoy it, have fun with it… I’ve seen it raise more smiles than ire, and bless it for that.

"I think that the original ABC posting should me fixed, because it’s very wrong." - Emmanuel Delahaye

No, it isn’t… Here are those two B-part variables without me making any changes, the original and then Emmanuel’s ~

|:\
BGG DGG | BGB BAG | AFF DFF | AFA AGF |
EGG DGG | CGG B,GG | cBc Adc | BGG G3 :|
|:\
gdd Bdd | gdg bag | fdd Add | fdf agf |
egg dgg | cgg BgB | cBc Adc | BGG G3 :|

And those are just two of many possibilities…

& |:\
gfg GB/c/d | gfg bag | f^ef FAd | fef agf |
egg d2 g | cgg B^AB | cBc Adc | BGF G2 :|

Enjoyed playing this with you the other day, ‘c’, especially in the minor key ;-)

I agree, people take themselves too seriously…

Yes on both counts, as I need to get rid of the hair shirt and the cat of nine tails. There’s only just so much skin one can flail raw. I should be making more music and being less self-critical. ;-)

Still ‘brain fried’. We’re heading out into the cold and wet to try blow away some of that fire and ground me to the earth.

YES! I loved that take on it. I was trying to pull it up, and yes, on tina too, the poor neglected instruments here…

Your company is always a pleasure and an inspiration, and I like where your going with the tina too… I forgot to ask about your ‘other’, how she’s doing, the string thing?

Well, come on then, add the minor mayhem here in the database so others can have the same fun. I do love that F nat…

X: 1
T: The Old Dear
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Amin
cAA EAA|cAc edc|dBB GBB|dBd fed|
cAA EAA|cAc edc|d^cd Bed|1 cAA Aed:|2 cAA A2e||
|:aee cee|aea c’ba|gdd Bdd|gdg bag|
faa eaa|daa caa|d^cd Bed|1 cAA A2e:|2 cAA Aed||

Avec rolls

X: 1
T: The Old Dear
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Amin
cAA EAA|~c3 edc|dBB GBB|~d3 fed|
cAA EAA|cAc edc|~d3 Bed|1 cAA Aed:|2 cAA A2e||
|:aee cee|~a2b c’ba|gdd Bdd|gdg bag|
faa eaa|daa ~c3|~d3 Bed|1 cAA A2e:|2 cAA Aed||

No wonder I felt I was screwing up the whole time, I was playing it differently, wouldn’t yuh just know ~ I was trying to follow but was misleading myself… :-D And, in my dottering old age, limping around on a bad ankle on the one side and a bad knee on the other, I had to have a lead-in ~ & I only slipped into F nat on the B part… :-P

X: 7
T: The Old Tin Tub
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: ADor
|: B |\
cAA E2 A | cAc edc | BGG DGG | BGB dcB |
cAA EAA | cA/B/c e2 f | gfg dcB | cA^G A2 :|
K: Amin
|: d |\
cee Aee | cea c’ba | gdd Gdd | gdg ba^g |
faa e2 a | daa c2 a | dfe dcB | cA^G A2 :|

The night you’d left - - - we both nodded off ( the two of us exhausted emotionally :-D ), only my nod resulted in me spilling a pint of G&T all over the floor… Such a waste… But fortunately no musical instruments or books were damaged, and I had an old shirt and plenty of orphan socks to soak it all up… ;-)

My great-grandfather used to play this all the time on the fiddle. Too bad I never got to meet him.:(

Paddy Fahy version

I’ve transcribed the version of the Irish Washerwoman played by Paddy Fahy on Eilis Crean’s website
http://www.eiliscreansite.com/audio_samples.html at the bottom right.
He’s tuned down a half step, so I’ve moved it back up from F# to G. He plays it through twice and then ends with one A part. I’ve probably missed a few cuts and double stops.

X:1
T:The Irish Washerwoman (Paddy Fahy Version)
R:Jig
L:1/8
M:6/8
Z:Gary Martin
K:G
d2c|BGB dGB|DGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|cac Adc|BGG G2 c|
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dBG|c (3cBc Adc|BGG G2 g||
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
g2 a fdg|ecA dBG|c (3cBc Adc|BGG G3|
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
g2 a fdg|ecA dBG|cBc ABc|dfa gdc||
(AB) G DGG|BGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|c2 E Adc|BGG g2 c||
BGG DGG|BGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|cgc Adc|BGG G2 g||
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
g2 a fdg|ecA dBG|c (3cBc Adc|BGG G3|
gfa gdg|gfg bag|fdf adf|Adf agf|
gga fdg|ecA dBG|ccc ABc|dfa gdc||
BGB dGB|DGB dcB|c2 A DGA|cBc edc|
BGB dGB|DGB dBG|c2E Adc|B[GB][GB] [G3B3]|]

Found a mistake: the high A in the 7th bar should be a high G.

Oops. I just found the "Add a Setting" button. Done. And the mistake is corrected. The odd-looking high G at the end of the first A part in the 2nd time through the tune is correct.

If it’s good enough for Paddy Fahey it’s good enough for me!

Thanks, Gary.

I will not play it. It’s the only Irish dance tune Irish Americans recognize and they go completely batsh*t when you play it for them. I’m not into crowd-pleasing antics and I’m not into encouraging people, especially young people, to engage in the binge-drinking self-destructive rituals of Paddywhackery.

If I get asked to play "The Irish Jig," meaning the Washerwoman, I play dumb and say "which one? There are hundreds of them, you know. Let me play you one I like."

Dave Rickard’s bagpipe setting

For anyone looking for a great bagpipe version of this tune Nemethink’s version is the setting from Dave Rickard’s excellent Irish bagpipe music book with the exception that all the Cs are sharp not natural. The book is well worth the fiver you can get it for these days too.