The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

groundbreaking eh !

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

Who is the older fiddler? And who does the other one *think* he is?

It’s an outrage! I mean, imagine if De Danann were to start playing Handel or something?

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

It’s the first time I’ve seen a classical violinist (and orchestra)have a good time playing. André Rieu is a real showman, but always seems to be having a great time. Don’t know who the other gentleman is.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

The older fiddler seems like the dubliners john shehan to me

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

two ways of looking at it. one, they are taking the p*ss or as has been suggested they are actually enjoying the freedom of playing irish music? whichever it is i still enjoyed it

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

I think you’re right right, TradLad.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

Being slightly Schizophrenic my answer comes in two opposing sections.

On the one hand i appreciate the attempt at a cross-over of styles and the sharing of the music with those who are not of a trad background.

On the other hand i couldn’t get past that while there was 6/8 in a bar, when the orchestra came in it lost its jig quality.

I only mildly criticise as a classical convert who still battles against a mis-spent youth every times he plays!

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

if you think that is a bit too classical you should check this out!

http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.555016

you’ll need to register and log in to hear the sample, if you dare. this is a recording of Irish Washerwoman with a symphony orchestra and not one traditional musician in sight!

Posted .

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

It was John Shean (Dubs.) Interesting to compare the two bowing styles and see which one was relaxed and "flowed" effortlessly. Good on yer John !

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

I hope no-one took my last comment too seriously. I think John Sheehan was classically trained, was he not? I don’t know if it was before or after learning jigs and reels. There’s no disputing that he can play the fiddle, anyway - I’d give my right arm to be able to use a bow like that.

It is good to see inter-genre musical relations, and this particular performance looks like fun, but it would have been nice to hear them playing the tune a bit more, intstead of speeding it up to the point of unintelligibility. And I’m jealous because I couldn’t play that fast even if I wanted to - on any instrument.

Something I quite like the idea of is Traditional Music arranged for string quartet. All the musicians would have to be traditional players. The first violinist would have to be a top-notch fiddler and the rest, well versed in countermelody and harmony as well as melodic playing. The cello and viola would take on the role of a bouzouki or guitar and the second violin would have a flexible role, shifting between melody and harmony. The idea is, after initially playing some notated arrangements, the musicians would build up enough of a relationship for spontaneous interplay.

Unfortunately, I’m not a good enough fiddler, arranger or people-organiser to make it work. So the idea is here to be stolen by those more worthy. If you think I’m crazy, email me and I’ll give you my home address so you can send round the men in the approprately coloured coats to tie me up.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

…If you think I’m stupid, just tell me how clever I am, and I’ll never know the truth.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

Sheehan was clasical trained (actually the only dubliner with formal musical education), but his first instruments was th tin whistle and therefore learned jigs and reels before his clasical education. You may disagree, but I think Sheehan is a great tradional fiddler.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

I’m not surprised that Andre Rieu’s orchestra sounded so metronomic. There’s a notorious old recording by the Boston Pops Orchestra playing Irish music which makes Irish trad players roll on the floor laughing, or cry their eyes out, when they hear it.
Most classical players need different training and mind-set to play Irish trad; most classical professionals are little different, and the orchestra will be in the hands of the conductor anyway, so the players themselves cannot really be blamed.
I think you’re more likely to get the real jig rhythm from classical players who specialise in baroque and are under a director who really understands the idiom - baroque music had a lot of lift.
In the final years of the classical era Mendelssohn wrote his "Italian" Symphony. The last movement is very fast and in 6/8. Mendelssohn, I strongly suspect, realised that a straight 6/8 would be too metronomic and dull (however fast it was played) so he wrote some lift into the rhythm |a>aa a>aa| and this gives the whole movement a driving force that carries all before it.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

OUCH! My arm is hurting just watching that classical guy’s bow arm! Hehe…I like how he came in at the wrong place…

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

If you can figure out where this came from it all makes sense - the celtic cross on the chain one of the audience is wearing gives the clue - definitely RTE. You couldn’t get an english audience to clap like that.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

It’s been kinda said already, but I reckon half (well, most if I’m honest) the reason why classical musicians don’t quite do justice to ITM is that they’re used to playing EXACTLY what the sheet music tells them to. I remember when I used to play flute, music would reasonably often have breathing marks in it. I guess this is kinda why if you had a midi controller for a fiddle (or something) and took a recording of someone really good then converted it into sheet music it’d most likely look like a mess with 1/64 notes etc all over it. Although if you took that sheet and gave it to a classical fiddler, and they played it, would it sound good??

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

like you’ve never heard before! - no; like I’ve heard it played like that all too often before. There is a handful of session tunes I have come to detest, mostly through over familiarity, and lowest common demonination, but the Irish Washerwoman is top of my list by some distance. It smacks of Old Mother Riley, Arthur Lucan and Kitty McShane, Old Mother McCree, Stage Irish, Plastic Paddies, Shamrock and Shilealaghs. It is a horrible tune, so often played in that pointless way of accelerating to uninteligibilty.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

I knew Santa Claus had a day job…

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

whatever the case may be, good or bad, someone needs to tell that piccolo to QUIT!! its complete garbage.

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Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

I wish it was as good for me as it was for them.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

An assault on the ears!! Reminders of paddywhackery, leprachauns in old Hollywood movies, etc. A good example of musicians playing from the dots who don’t understand trad (I have no problem with players using music who are able to interpret it). This tune has come up before - some years ago there was a hilarious thread on a Welsh version of the tune called the Irish Waterman I recall. Irrespective of how awful it sounds here, the late Clare concertina player, Gerdie Commane could make it sound like a great jig!

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

Oh. My God. 8 0

That’s just awful. Reminds me of Pat Boone covering Elvis songs.

Re: The Irish Washerwoman like you’ve never heard before!

I’ve listened to the Naxos recording 8.555016 ("Irish Rhapsody" by the Richard Hayman Orchestra ) that frisbee mentioned some posts back. I’d say it’s the music equivalent of a coffee-table magazine - folk music in a tuxedo under the chandeliers.
There’s not much Irish trad music to be found on the Naxos site; two CDs perhaps more to our taste are http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=EUCD1308 (by Florie Brown an American fiddler with a cross-over style) and http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=EUCD1897 (by the fiddler Kieran Fahy, distinctly more traditional than Florie Brown).
And then there are a couple of Naxos CDs devoted to the music of the respected 19th century Irish classical composer Hamilton Harty who was influenced by the music of his native land much in the same way that Vaughan Williams was influenced by English folk music a couple of generations later.
The Harty CDs are http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.554732, his Irish Symphony and a few other orchestral works with an Irish basis, and
http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.557731, his piano concerto.