Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Ah, Surely, the previous guy beat me to it, but for a reel.

I actually don’t much like most slip jigs, something-or-nothing tunes, but this one I’ve just started to remember and I like it. Any one know its name please? A-music foillows:

T:Gan Aimh
M:9/8
L:1/8
Q:100
R:Slip Jig
B:
K:G
GA |: BGG AGE GED | (3EFG D DEG AGA | BGG AGE GED | (3EFG D DEF GGA :|

Incidentally, one delicious simple slip jig I’ve just started playing is Land’s End, composed by Michael (Harp) Rooney, and is to be found on his and his wife June McCormack’s excellent CD of the same name. Flute and harp lovely together. They also are known as ‘Draoicht’.

Thanks for any help you can offer…

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Sounds kind of like the Swaggering Jig.

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Na Ceannabhain Bhana

Posted .

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Seems it’s especially popular in Miltown Malbay! I have recordings by Kitty Hayes & Peter Laban, Edel Fox & Ronan O’Flaherty, Brid O’Donohue, and Tommy McCarthy. (Also Seamus Ennis, Pauls McGrattan & O’Shaughnessy, and Dan Herlihy & John Drew.) It can be a little hard to find because of the difficulty people have spelling the title.

Ennis’ recording gives an English version of the title, “The Little Fair Cannavans”, but I’ve been unable to find out what a cannavan is!

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Na Ceannabhain Bheana = Little Fair Cannavans

It’s the tune to a dandling song. Cannavan is the name of a family in Connemara that Seamus Ennis just happened to be visiting one day back in the 1940s or 1950s. The “little fair cannavans” are/were very blonde maternal twins who were only a few weeks or months old at the time; Seamus Ennis heard their mother singing them to sleep with that tune, so he learned the tune shortly thereafter and named the jig after the infants.

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

One of the most popular slip jigs.

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Thank you friends from afar, you are all very kind, taking the time to crunch the ABCs and help me out. Great to have the title explained so comprehensively, so now I can impress my session cronies with the erudite historical details!

The irony is, that I’ve just bought Edel Fox and Ronan O’Flaherty’s CD but hadn’t clocked where the tune had got into my head from. Yarra, brain cells progressively delinking, with help from the Sainsbury’s Single malt Irish…

Greetings Slainte, over there in Japan, I too miss the West Yorks music scene from my days in Bradford and Leeds, and a shame we didn’t have some tunes together while you were in England.

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Ennis did sometimes sing The Ceanabhain Bhana. When he picked it up, it was sung by a woman in Connemara who was minding the two. Ennis’ own story doesn’t mention them being twins, Mici and Maire ‘they are the fairhaired Cannavans’. The Fairhaired Cannavans is also a name given to the bogcotton in Connemara.

Posted .

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

Cthuilleanpiper - What do you mean by ’ maternal twins’?

Re: Help me with the name of this slip jig please!

is it “fraternal twins”? I forget. I’m obviously not an obstetrician.

What I meant was, Non-identical twins. Carried by the same mother during the same pregnancy and born a few minutes or hours apart, but definitely not identical and possibly of different genders. Somehow or other that idea got stuck in my head. It could be complete BS. Since the two Cannavans in the song may very well be alive to this day, I suppose it behooves me to be absolutely sure of such things since there are so many fact checkers with nothing better to do on these ITM discussion boards.

Of course they might have been “irish twins” too - born about 9.5 months to a year apart !!!

Look the main thing is it was a dandling song for two very young, very fair skinned and/or fair haired members of a Connemara family named Cannavan. Hence the title.

If you want to hear the song, it’s on Cran’s CD Lover’s Ghost.