What sets are you learning?

What sets are you learning?

What sets are you learning to play at the moment ? Just interested in knowing what to put together. Sometimes what I play in a set works, sometimes it doesn’t.

Re: What sets are you learning?

If I learn a tune without a set to put it with, I usually key it into the tunes section and go to the "recordings by this name" section. Then I will usually find a set I like.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Good Idea Paddy!
When I hear a set I like I go first to "recordings" and try to find the tunes, then I try to learn them

Re: What sets are you learning?

Knowing what sets to put together comes with experience! and a lot of listening to other people of course. There is not enough listening going on in Dublin sessions I fear.

Re: What sets are you learning?

I very rarely learn whiole sets. Infact I havn’t done so for donkeys. I learn tunes, and they just seem to find sets for themselves. The whole thing of playing sets off records in sessions can be a dodgy one. I reckon you should only stick to the absolute classics. This means definitely no Flook or Lunasa etc.

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Re: What sets are you learning?

The Bothy band are OK, apparently. :-)

Except the Laird of Drumblair, perhaps?

Re: What sets are you learning?

tee he

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Re: What sets are you learning?

Michael, You don’t learn sets for donkeys? What are these donkeys of which you speak? Who said English was a common language?

Re: What sets are you learning?

They’re French donkeys, AlBrown. No point in learning sets for them because they don’t like Irish music.

Now, Ptarmigan might have worked something up for them with his hurdy-gurdy, I don’t know. Some Cajun tunes might work as well.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Cajun TUNES? I’ve never heard one yet, though I’ve listened to the odd cajun album…

Re: What sets are you learning?

You’re kidding. Really? I’ve heard lots of Cajun tunes. Never paid attention to the names of any of them, but I know they’re there. Just saw a group at a bluegrass festival the other week called the Red Stick Ramblers who played all sorts of great stuff. I should have bought one of their cd’s.

They had this thing they did…one of the fiddle players stood on stage playing a tune, and this other guy stood right next to him with a pair of hammered dulcimer sticks and hammered out a rhythm *right on the fiddle strings as the other guy was playing*. I’d never seen anything like that! It sounded pretty good, too!

Re: What sets are you learning?

Ahhhhyyiiiiii!

La Cassine Special, Bosco Stomp, Eunice Two-Step, Chere Jous Roses, Two Step a’ Hadley (sp?). I learned those some years ago from someone whose family came from La. And some others I’ve forgotten the names of. Great fun to play and good practice for double stops!

I’m learning a set off of the first Kane Sister’s album. Trip to Galway/Crabs in the Skillet/Fly in the Porter.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Lassez les bon temps roulez!!!!!

Re: What sets are you learning?

OK, kennedy and Christine, I stand rebuked

Re: What sets are you learning?

Heh. Not rebuked, just edumicated :-)

That little trick with the dulcimer sticks is called "straw beating" I think. I guess it used to be done with real straws of wheat or what have you? I saw it done once, can’t remember where. Sounded amazing!

Re: What sets are you learning?

Doonaclore G
Road to Monalea Dm
McGovern’s G

John Carty’s G
Feeding the Birds G
Bunker Hill D

Crosses of Annagh Am
Devanney’s Goat D
Cregg’s Pipes A

Re: What sets are you learning?

Sorry, Doonagore, not Doonaclore

Re: What sets are you learning?

A little while ago I learned a nice set of slides: Brosna, Mick Duggan’s, and Denis Murphy’s.

Re: What sets are you learning?

I believe it was Cab Calloway’s jazz band that first had the drummer use his sticks on the string bass while the bassist did the fingering. I’ve seen it copied several times.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Try Dickie Sherlock’s, The Mountain Top and Lucy Campbell’s. A great set but you’ll sometimes have fun (or frustration!) at the number of times people will try and convert the final tune into Last Night’s Fun.

Re: What sets are you learning?

I’ve heard wooden chopsticks used on guitar strings with pretty incredible results as a backing track for performance poetry. Like tinkling glass or water over a waterfall. A bit hard to do on the fiddle though, unless you have at least three hands.

Got no radical sets, so what would I say to this. The set I put together for hottfiddlers virtual sess in another thread is a cross between Stockton’s Wing and something else again:
Humours of Tulla/The Bucks of Oranmore/Jolly Tinker
Boring, but at least I like it.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Old Scraper, you talk of waterfalls and Stockton’s Wing in the same post. Have you heard the Belltable Waltz set by Stockton’s Wing on one of their earlier recordings? The sound effects at the start were incredible and dripping water was one of the things I remember.

Re: What sets are you learning?

No Bannerman, I haven’t heard all of it, just the little taster clip that Tara Records have with them playing part of The Girls of Banbridge. I know The Wing’s The Belltable is a must hear, and one day I will, God willing. I love Maurice Lennon’s fiddle playing and I do have their Humours of Tulla/The Bucks of Oranmore track and some more of their early stuff (thanks to you know who you are, who sent it to me). There is another of their tracks that I also really want to get hold of. Its the one with didge when Steve Cooney first joined them from Oz, the clip at Tara has them playing The Morning Dew. Its billed as a kind of joining of Irish and Aboriginal culture. As I live in Central Oz, this fascinates me a heap. Some people now-a-days think they are doing radical stuff only to find Stockton’s Wing has already done it ages and ages ago. But thanks Bannerman - I really must get to hear much much more of them.

Re: What sets are you learning?

I agree that the Wing were a very innovative group for their time; they were also top class musicians for if I’m not mistaken, both flute player Paul Roche and fiddler Maurice Lennon took the All-Ireland titles on their respective instruments the year they came together - 1977. As for good sets, the Wing’s Chicago set (Chicago Reel, Reavey’s Never was Piping so Gay and Castle Kelly) has to be one of the all time greats. If I can locate the recording with these tunes, I’ll post the details here for it’s definitely one to look out for.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Since I just put together a new set of MP3s to study, I can quickly answer this question. (Just for the heck of it, I’m going to (*) the tunes I already know.)

River of Ponds (*)
Good Morning You Would Like Some Tea
Blueberry Quadrille

Diane’s Happiness
David’s Reel

Pretty Little Mary (*)
Joe Paliser’s
Hound’s Tune (*)

The Millstone
Kiss the Bride in Bed (*)
Lady on the Island

Liffey Banks (*)
Shaskeen (*)
Bag of Spuds

Skeleton Reel
Flying Reel

Dowd’s #9
Hunter’s House

James Gannon’s
Primrose Polka

Re: What sets are you learning?

Wow! There you go, flauta dolce, an all time great to go on the learning list. Thanks Bannerman.

Re: What sets are you learning?

Thank you very much. It is interesting to know how everyone approaches this.