Slubhail a Gradh?

Slubhail a Gradh?

Is there anyone who knows what this means or where I can hear a recorded version of this tune? It is one of the first ones I ever tried to play on fiddle, but I would like to hear how it is played traditionally, if it is in fact played by anyone. Thanks

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Makes no sense to me as a Modern Irish phrase….but, I’m not a native speaker by any stretch. My guess is that this is some mis-spelling or it is Old Irish. Give me a day or so…..I’ll float it around some Irish speaking circles and see what turns up.

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Thanks. It is a tune in TC Kelly’s Irish tunes arranged for violin and keyboard. I do have the feeling is written in old irish.

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

siubhail = siúil = walk and gradh = grá = love so….in the end you get Siúil a ghrá = walk, o love.

siúil is the imperative form of siubhail and that "h" that appears in grá is required in the vocative case which is indicated by the "a" that preceeds it.

Now…just don’t ask me anything about music!!!

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Very impressive! Thanks. Do you think it basically translates to
"Walk with me, my love"? That sounds like a name for a tune, rather than Walk! or O I love to walk. 🙂

Siul a gra

Siul a gra is probably what you are looking for. You’ll find the lyrics in english here http://www.irishsongs.com/lyrics.php?Action=view&Song_id=444 Do a google on "Siul a gra" and you should find several recordings. I know Clanad recorded it snyway. best of luck. "Shubhail a gradh" is ancient spelling!

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

I don’t speak Gaelic at all, but I think you’ll find the link I posted above is the one you want.

I think what Backer posted is a completely different song and I think the different spelling (should have been ‘suil a gra’, by the way) is because they’re actually different words, rather than one being an ancient form of the other.

The spelling of the title of this thread won’t help either, though - look at ceol’s above for the correct spelling.

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Aaagh! It was ceolgaelach, rather than ceolachan! Sorry, both.

Have my Saturday morning eyes in. Sorry. 🙁

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Heh, heh, heh… That doesn’t mean I haven’t been watching all along, with my Ó Dónaill open… I love watching things unfold… 😎

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

I was holding back with the translation "Sloppy Gradient"…though that might be an alternate way of saying in effect, putting on my "Wizard of Oz" wicked ‘which’ personae ~ "Come with my my pretty!"

"Come with my my pretty!" (this ‘which’ had a stutter…)

"Come with me my pretty!"

Re: Slubhail a Gradh? ~ Shule Aroon / Shule a Roon / / Siúil a Ruin

Siúil, siúil, siúil a ruin,
Siúil go sochair agus siúil go ciuin,
Siúil go doras agus ealaigh liom,
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan…

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

The verb, in command + noun in the vocative case:

Siúil a ghrá.

Had it been a note or two left out in a transcription ye all would have been quick to point out the mistake!

The spelling in the title posting is just someone’s pre-standardisation (pre-1950’s) version.

The phrase is a command, can’t think of lyrics to match this title though which would give any form of clarification as to why our love should walk. Perhaps this is an alternative title to the song ‘Siúil a Rún’? If you could post a link to the music you have for this I’ll tell you if it is indeed the same song.

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Isn’t it "Go, My Love"? It’s a command form (imperative) of walk….in other words…"Walk away, My Love". ???

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Then there’s the version collected in Missouri and (I think) Wisconsin: Shule, shule, shule aroon, Shula a-rack-a-shack-a, Shule a barbecue

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Well? ~ that’s just the chorus, what are the verses?

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

I love Siúil a ruin. I have that tune on one of my cds, but I haven’t tried to learn that one yet.

Sara

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

I found the other lyrics, and a translation for the chorus.

Siuil A Ruin (an old Irish love song)

"I wish I was on yonder hill
Tis there Id sit and cry my fill
Till every tear would turn a mill
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan.

Siuil, siuil, siuil a ruin
Siuil go sochair agus siuil go ciuin
Siuil go doras agus ealaigh liom
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan

Ill sell my rock, Ill sell my reel
Ill even sell my spinning wheel
to buy my love a sword of steel
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan

Siuil, siuil, siuil a ruin
Siuil go sochair agus siuil go ciuin
Siuil go doras agus ealaigh liom
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan

I’ll dye my petticoats, I’ll dye them red
and it’s round the World I will beg for bread
until my parents would wish me dead.
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan

Siuil, siuil, siuil a ruin
Siuil go sochair agus siuil go ciuin
Siuil go doras agus ealaigh liom
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan

I wish my love would return from France,
his fame and fortune there advanced.
If we meet again, ‘t will be by chance.
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan

Siuil, siuil, siuil a ruin
Siuil go sochair agus siuil go ciuin
Siuil go doras agus ealaigh liom
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan"

And so she waits…and waits…and hopes for a boat that will never come.

Translation for above chrous:
Go, go, go, my love Go quietly and go peacefully Go to the door and fly with me And safe for aye may my darling be


Sara

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Celtic lass, what CD do you have it on? I can’t find it anywhere. I just ordered a book/CD set called Irish Slow Airs, and I am hoping it is on there. I play it, but I am not sure I play it correctly, since the written music does not usually translate to the actual playing.

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

"110 Ireland’s Best Slow Airs"
Waltons Publishing, 1999 (& a CD is available)
ISBN: 1-85720-082-9

Page 36, air #60: "Siúil a Ghrá"

This is not the air for "Siúil a Ruin" which I have known, played and sung to…

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Thomas Moore’s setting to this old air is called "Come My Love"
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: air
K: b minor
F |
B3 c d2 c2 | B2 F2 F2 z G | A2 F2 d3 c | B2 E2 E2 z E |
F2 FE D2 E2 | A2 B2 d2 de | f3 e d3 B | dc B>^A B2 z2 | ~ ~ ~

The above ABC’s are from the book, the fist half of the air, from page 36, air #60 ~ "Siúil a Ghrá"…

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

This is rough, but see if this is something like the way you know it? ~

Siúil, siúil, siúil a ruin,
Siúil go sochair agus siúil go ciuin,
Siúil go doras agus ealaigh liom,
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan…

e4 d4 | A2 G2 A4 | c2 A2 gg ee | dc AE G4 |
A3 B cc dc | A2 G2 A4- | A2 cd e4 | c3 e dc AG | A6 ||

Oh I wish I were on yonder hill
‘Tis there I’d sit and cry my fill,
And ev’ry tear would turn a mill,
Is go dte tu mo mhuirnin slan…

cd |
e2 e2 d3 e | dcAG A3 B | c2 A2 g2 e2 | dcAE G2 EG |
A3 B c2 dc | A2 G2 A4- | A2 cd e4 | d3 e dcAG | A8 ||

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Peter, Paul & Mary sang a American version of this. The tune is lovely but …..boy! talk about garbled old Irish!
One of the verses -
Johnny’s gone for a soldier…..

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Pearse- Green Linnet made a series of albums called Celtophile. The cd I have was part of that series and is called, The Voice of Celtic Women: There Was A Lady. But, Green Linnet doesn’t make them anymore. But you may be able to find some used on http://www.amazon.com/ The artist who sang the tune was Mairin Fahy with Reeltime. I hope that helps! 🙂

Sara

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Thanks to all. I have never done abc so here are the the first few bars, just by note names. The number is the string, the letter is the note. It is in the key of A and 4/4 time that switches to 2/4 at the end:

3f#/ 2b(dotted) c# d c#/ 2b 4 f# f3 g/ 2a 3f# 2 d c#/ 2b 4e 4e 4d 4e/ 4f# 4e 4d 4e/

This will probably not make a lot of sense, but maybe someone will be able to identify it.

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Your transcription ~
3f# |
2b(dotted) c# d c# | 2b 4 f# f3 g | 2a 3f# 2 d c# | 2b 4e 4e 4d 4e | 4f# 4e 4d 4e |

= K: b minor
F |
B3 c d2 c2 | B2 F2 F2 z G | A2 F2 d3 c | B2 E2 E2 z E | F2 FE D2 E2 | ~

The dots are in this book, and a CD is available as well:

"110 Ireland’s Best Slow Airs"
Waltons Publishing, 1999
ISBN: 1-85720-082-9

Page 36, air #60: "Siúil a Ghrá"

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Learn ABC’s pearse, you’ll never regret it:

http://www.lesession.co.uk/abc/abc_notation.htm

Here’s a first lesson, the notes, a captal C = middle C, between the treble and bass clef. I’m going to start with the G string of the fiddle, and that is shown with a comma just after it saying it is an octave below, anyway, here’s a step scale to middle C and above:

G, A, B, C D E F G A B c d e f g a b c’ d’ e’ ~ etc…

To lengthen a not a number comes after it, but first, let’s establish the meter or M:, and a beat value or ‘length’ or L:…

M: 4/4
L: 1/8 (so 1/4 would be represented by a 2 after the note, 3 is a dotted 2)
K: b minor (= key)
N: Your transcription ~ approximately… (N = note)
F2 |
B3 c d2 c2 | B2 F2 F3 G | A2 F2 d3 c | B2 E2 E2 DE | F2 E2 D2 E2 | ~

Re: Slubhail a Gradh?

Ceolachan, that’s the one. Thanks. It was really great to be able to hear it on a midi file. Thanks also for the mini abc lesson. Much appreciated.
By the way all, I did order that Slow Airs book and CD, so I won’t be using a book with ancient names for tunes anymore.

"Siúil A Ruin" ~ as I’ve known the other air apparent

Key signature: E Dorian
Submitted on February 5th 2007 by ceolachan.
https://thesession.org/tunes/6756

You’re very welcome pearse… I hope I got close to what you were looking for… You’d probably enjoy this one too…

Siúil a grá

Karen Casey sings this on the album Solas. Most of it’s in English, with part of the refrain (Siúil, siúil, siúil a ghrá) in Irish.