bows

bows

I have been playing fiddle for over 30 yrs, and have some
rather expensive bows and I’ll tell you the “incredibow” mentioned earlier (with link) cannot be beat, even for
an advanced player (about 150 US)--check it out !

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Re: bows

HI Hauke, I have been playing for a similar length of time and was looking at those bows on the web just the other day. A lot of beginner players seem to like them so it’s good to hear of someone more experienced getting on well with them too. Have you seen the coloured ones in the flesh? If so, do they look good or cheap?

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Seems almost too good to be true…what makes them so good? What’s the advantage of them other than price? Do they really play better than a hand made pernambuco stick?

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They’re so lightweight that I can play for longer periods of time. The tension makes them nice and bouncy (does take some getting used to at first), which I find makes triplets much easier. I’ve been using mine for 2 years, and I haven’t broken one hair…not one hair. That’s pretty amazing. And you can’t beat the price.

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I’ve just ordered another two - I have two already. I find them light, easy to use and I can accessorise because of the large range of colours they come in!!
They now do a hi-tension version for instruments with more than 4 strings which I’m going to try.
My husband who sound engineers our band says the tone quality/signal strength of the cheap Incredibow is better than the £400 ordinary bow and the £140 carbon fibre bow.
I’ve had mine about 2 years now and not broken a single hair and saved money on not having to have them rehaired like normal bows.

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Mine arrived in the post this morning….it’s incredibly light and the tone quality is much better than my (cheap) wooden bows. Think I will definately get another.

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FF - If they’re that great, why have more than one? (Just wondering)

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The reason for more than one is they come in two weights, a hi tension version and loads of colours including a range of holographic ones that look great under stage lights!! I was like a kid in a sweet shop trying to choose so had to get more than one.
I also try to keep at least one bow in every fiddle case - nothing worse than turning up and opening the case to find no bow!!

Re: bows

“…I’ll tell you the ”incredibow“ mentioned earlier (with link) cannot be beat…” -- hauke

I think that was me, providing the suggestion and link in a former bow thread.

I love mine!! I’d be curious about what the heavier weight would be like, but I’ve been getting on so well with my feather-weight that I don’t think I need another bow.

I bought mine on the strength of the discussion of them over on the FiddleForum.com … after all, they aren’t that expensive. I’ve yet to loan it out to a fiddler without getting a “Wow!” reaction from them.

Re: bows

Ah Domnull, don’t tell me you only have one bow? I have an electric fiddle for band gigs and an acoustic for Morris and sessions. I always keep two bows in each case so that unforseen emergencies are covered. (A fellow fiddler once told me an apocryphal tale of an exploding/disintegrating bow). Since then I’ve always carried a spare…….

Re: bows

FF
Yes - one violin (a good one) one bow (a good one)!

But if you do gigs etc and use electric+acoustic, fair enough. I was just curious 🙂

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Exploding/disintegrating bows aren’t apocryphal. Apparently, it happened to Martin Hayes on stage once - all the hairs came out of the end of the bow and he had to go offstage to get his spare.

In Bristol we have a very energetic (and extremely good) fiddler who, at one time had a justified reputation for shedding bow hairs at a rate of 3 or 4 per tune (I’ve witnessed it!) - and there only about 120 hairs on a bow … Since then, he has gone over to the Incredibow and hasn’t looked back.

What is more apocryphal, though, is the story of an orchestral violinist of a nervous disposition who always kept a rosin-free teflon-haired bow to hand specially for the very difficult stuff. Although, having seen some of the stuff those guys are expected to play, I don’t think the story should necessarily be viewed as apocryphal 🙂

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--“Seems almost too good to be true…what makes them so good?”

For one thing, they’re very light and very responsive. Holding one is absolutely effortless. The tone they draw from my fiddle is better than any of my other bows. I don’t know about too good to be true, but most fiddlers who’ve tried them, love them.

Many classical players do not … I think part of it is the odd look (classical players seem to be WAY more conservative than fiddlers) and part of it is also because a lot of classical players are used to very high end gear … The Incredibow stacks up very well with low-to-moderate priced bows, but I doubt it’s as good as bows costing thousands of dollars.

--“What’s the advantage of them other than price?”

They’re very sturdy, look really good, are easy to hold, are exceptionally light and agile and the “hair” doesn’t break or wear out. They use very little rosin and don’t need to be re-rosined anywhere near as often as horse hair.

Professional players who used to have to re-hair once a month have used an Incredibow for a year or more without needing to re-hair!

--“Do they really play better than a hand made pernambuco stick?”

Up to a point. I’ve got a Glasser CF bow and have compared it against wooden bows costing up to about $800-$900 and always prefered the Glasser. The Incredibow is even better; it’s much more agile on the strings and the tone is better.

My wife, who’s not a musician, can easily tell which bow I’m using from the next room from the clarity of the sound.

I know I sound like a commercial for them but I’ve got no stake in the success of these bows. I’m just a *very* satisfied customer and, as such, would like to help out a company that is doing excellent work.

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Thanks for the info rzaikoski. Sounds like they are definately worth checking out, though I’m not sure I’d like the light weight. It’s just hard to believe that a good bow could go for so little.

Re: bows

Screetch, you could probably contact them to see if they’ve got a try-it-before-you-buy-it policy. I’m not sure.

Re: bows

Greetings!

I have a small assortment of relatively inexpensive bows and have ended up gravitating towards pernambuco wood for tone and carbon fiber bow for it’s slightly lighter weight and ease of playing. I also have the “Incredibow”, which was relatively inexpensive, is extremely light and quick. It’s a fun bow!

If you get one, note that these bows use something resembling clear plastic monofilament fibers instead of horse hair, so lots of rosin will be needed to get it “primed”.

Give one a try! If you were a painter, would you have only one paint brush? And if you had a box full of brushes, would they all be the same?

P.S. They are available for Cello too.