The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

I’ll try again.

This is the only song on the old Molloy/Brady/Peoples LP. A stirring potted history of Ireland’s decline and diaspora in the 19th century.

There is a partial discussion of it here - https://thesession.org/recordings/display/218 - in the discussion of the whole album. Helpful for lyrics, but it doesn’t touch on its origin.

Now I perform this occasionally with a mate of mine, but never know how to introduce it authoritatively. Presumably Paul Brady was recommended it by someone who found it in an old songs volume, or printed in an old newspaper etc, with no credit for author, date etc.

But I’m hoping someone will know. Anyone ?

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

Its on the sleeve notes of the album as far as I remember

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

Seem to remember he learned the song from an old singer in Co. Tyrone, or possibly Paddy Tunney. I’ll check the sleeve notes later, unless someone beats me to it. He sings it in a pub session on the "Come West Along The Road" DVD.

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Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

yeah thanx troops - I dont have the album covers, just a copy, so if you cld look it up that’d be greatly appreciated.

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

Did you try the digitasl trsadition database at Mudcat.org?

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

‘And our Parliament in College Green,
For to assemble ‘t will be seen….’

This is a reference to the Irish Parliament of 1782, often referred to as Grattan’s Parliament, held in Dublin in response to the Dungannon Convention of Volunteers in February of that year.
The song is obviously post-Union (1800), because it refers to the dissolved Irish Parliament, as many patriots did, forgetting that it remained a largely Protestant and landed affair, and not particularly responsive to the needs of a predominantly Catholic and rural labouring population.
The reference to the ‘tithes and taxes’ paid in support of the Irish Church indicates that the song pre-dates the Act of Disestablishment in 1869.
So, it was definitely composed between 1800 and 1869, but I would suggest that the reference to ‘famine and disease’ indicates a date some time after the years of potato failure between 1845 and 1848. However, famine was a fact of life for the western peasantry throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, so there is no way to be certain of this date.

More thoughts….

The reference to ‘mills and factories…/ To employ the labouring core’ also suggests to me a date after the 1840s, the period in which large mills and factories began to be developed in Great Britain. Prior to the 1840s, mills and factories were relatively small affairs, and it was only after this period that Britain began to develop into an industrial nation, with enormous re-investment of profits for industrial expansion. So, perhaps a song of the 1850s or 1860s, years of economic growth in Britain, and continued economic stagnation in Ireland.

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

I don’t argue with the conclusions above.
There were sizeable mills in Britain worked by water power by 1800; then came the development of steam from the 1820s if not before; but what really, I reckon, speeded up and enlarged the industrial process was the linkage created by the railways between the sources of raw materials (coal, ironstone, whatever) and the factories, steelworks and ports, around the 1840s.

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

I’m not sure that Fliúiteadóir’s audiences will be exactly rivetted to their seats by our historical ponderings….

Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

"I learned the song "Shamrock Shore" from Dublin singer Frank Harte. It most probably dates from around 1850 and is unusual in that it isn’t a "party" song ( to use the Northern euphemism ) but an objective, hard and astute commentary on the state of the nation during the first 50 years of the last century. It ends with a plea to Irishmen to settle their differences for the common good, a plea that falls on deaf ears 100 years later."
Paul Brady - from the sleeve of "Molloy,Peoples and Brady".

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Re: The Shamrock Shore ( not Paddy’s Green … ) - origins ?

" I’m not sure that Fliúiteadóir’s audiences will be exactly rivetted to their seats by our historical ponderings…."

THanks robert for the stagecraft tip. I WILL try to kep it short n sweet.