Flook or no Flook

Flook or no Flook

What are your views on Flook?

Every young musician in Ireland seem to be obsessed with them.
I love their music but would never try play it. They have some lovely tunes etc.
I was at a session at the weekend in which there must have been 5/6 sets that were played and were from their last album.

I look forward to hearing what peopple think on this.

Re: Flook or no Flook

Their stuff never struck me as session material, though there are a few lovely tunes there.

Where was the session - I’d be curious to see what the bodhran player was doing.

Re: Flook or no Flook

I’e two of theirs - Flook! Live, and Rubai. I’m not in a hurry to buy more - I buy few CD’s - partly because I suspect theyd just be more of the same “Flook Sound”. Others may correct me on this.

The idea of a band driven by three flutes (or flute and whistle) was novel and experimental and I think it has worked. I don’t mind jazzy bits, though am not so keen on heavy-breathing Andean effects - partly, I suppose, because I’ve been riled by cr*ppy Andean disks I’ve bought of late, nothing to do with Flook at all! They’ve come up with some brilliant new compositions brilliantly set - Trip To Herve’s (IMO), The North Star, for example. Like many composers they’ve come up with some unmemorable ones too, but clever arrangements and placing within tracks have made these also sound good. However, the new ones which will last will, I imagine, be the ones that can survive in the hands of other players, outside of the band’s arrangements.

Yes, I like them, I think they’re a good band.

Re: Flook or no Flook

They don’t have three flutes!

Flute/Whistle lead, flute/piano accordian backing, guitar and bodhran rhythm section.

They’re fantastic musicians, very tight arrangements as you’d expect from a band that have toured and played together as long as they have, and catchy tunes, but almost nothing I could play myself. I have three Flook CDs in my collection, but the last one I bought I didn’t listen to much - it was indeed more of the same, to my ears, as Nicholas suspected.

Most of their recorded stuff is of their own composition, and as Nicholas also said, good as it is, much of it doesn’t survive outside their own arrangements. I’d prefer more traditional tunes on their albums, maybe a 50/50 mix of old and self-comosed tunes.

Brian Finnegan is a great composer, I’ve seen him at work both composing and arranging on the fly, and he does everythign by ear, barely able to scribble down tunes in a vague version of ABC format before changing things around again. The guy lives for his music (and breakfast).

Re: Flook or no Flook

Flook is one of the examples where my opinion of the musical abilities of the Band-Members is totally contrary to my opinion of the music. Their Music bores me to death, but they all can play.
What is so exciting about Jazz in Folk-Music? My answer is: Nothing.
It is nice to use syncopes or unusual time-signatures sometimes, but why does everybody treat Flook, as if they invented those things.
If I wanted to hear Jazz, I would listen to Jazz-Musicians (I never want to, though)

Posted by .

Re: Flook or no Flook

They used to have 3 flutes with Mike McGoldrick as one of the founder members.

Re: Flook or no Flook

Ah, you may well be right. He isn’t specifically mentioned on their website.

Would it be fair to say they haven’t had three flutes in the line up in the last five years, or on any of their recorded material except Flook Live, which was recorded in 1999?

Re: Flook or no Flook

McGoldrick is actually back playing with flook. He stepped in to cover for sarah allen while she wasnt available in their last tour and as far as i know, he is still touring with them. theres a few sets up on youtube with flook and mcgoldrick playing though quality isnt the greatest

Re: Flook or no Flook

I love their music! Great playing, tight arrangements.

I have learned some of their tunes to play in the privacy of my own home, but it’s not “trad” and wouldn’t fit into any session situation that I am regularly in.

Re: Flook or no Flook

i can understand some one not wanting to listen to flook if they didnt like their music…. fair enough….

but i think if something is enjoyable to listen to and people enjoy playing it ,why not?

why do some ppl have such a big problem with new gruops adding syncopations and new techniques? ppl enjoy listening to it…. isnt that all that matters….?

Re: Flook or no Flook

If you are p[laying at sessions do not copy the bodhran playing. It will not fit in.

Re: Flook or no Flook

Even JohnJoe doesn’t play that way (much) at sessions, bb!

Re: Flook or no Flook

“What is so exciting about Jazz in Folk-Music? My answer is: Nothing.
It is nice to use syncopes or unusual time-signatures sometimes, but why does everybody treat Flook, as if they invented those things.
If I wanted to hear Jazz, I would listen to Jazz-Musicians (I never want to, though)”

Why do people assume that just because musicians break from the straight 4/4 pattern or veer away from the 2 sharps in a D scale that it automaticaly becomes ‘Jazz’

Miles Davis or John Coltrane would vomit at the thought of their great works in the 1950’s heyday of Be-Bop be associated with a simple variation on a folk tune from the 2000’s.

If you’re not aware of the genre of Jazz (which you admitted not to be) don’t bother to compare a genre that you don’t know about to something that you won’t listen to.

T

Re: Flook or no Flook

In our session some Flook is played and believe or nor the Bodhran players don’t have any problems with these tunes, as they are all Joe-Joe Kelly admirers and use Flook CD as training objects at home. Maybe the standard of Bodhran playing is unexpectedly high at Zürich…
Flook tunes are a session killer because most sessioneers don’t know them and they are not as easy to pick up as standard jigs, but the punters loove them!

Re: Flook or no Flook

jazz in trad Scots/Irish fiddle tunes is at least as old as Texas Swing or Peerie Willie. I don’t know why each new generation has to wake up thinking they invented it. And jazz doesn’t just mean 1950s be-bop and beyond - it used to be popular dance music - folk music, even - itself.

I’ve quite enjoyed what I heard of Flook, but any highly-arranged music is out of place in a pub session, unless there is a group of players obsessively listening to the same CDs or practising together, and then it just seems cliquish, like doing your stage set at a session

Posted by .