Alternatives to numbering?

Alternatives to numbering?

This is a problem I’ve come up against on here.

As numbering is forbidden, what do you name each tune in a short set if the tunes do not have individual name and are only ever played as part of that set?

I know this is not a common problem in Irish music, but what about the contemporary composition: Ice House Scottisches 1 and 2 (which are now both up seperately under "Ice House Scottische"), the C Polkas (under C and C+), and now the New Jigs (I am still pondering)?

Suggestions appreciated.

Re: Alternatives to numbering?

Do it the traditional way.
Make up a name & use it until someone comes up with something better.

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Re: Alternatives to numbering?

I don’t know why numbering isn’t allowed; perhaps it’s something to do with the way the database is structured.
But could you use wording such as "Ice House First Scottische"?

Re: Alternatives to numbering?

Roman numerals?
Ice House Scottische I
Ice House Scottische II
etc?

Re: Alternatives to numbering?

I don’t know about other traditions, but I don’t think there are that many Irish tunes that actually don’t have names. If the composer didn’t name it, someone is bound to have given it a name at some time (a notable exception being Paddy Fahy’s tunes). Furthermore, I rather suspect that the widespread ignorance of tune names among traditional musicians is a relatively recent thing, owing to the vast numbers of tunes - and relatively little associated information - readily available for our listening and learning.

Re: Alternatives to numbering?

Far too many tunes in publication for any single person to assimilate. Nearly 8000 here, and a significant fraction aren’t even Irish dance tunes, or from related Celtic or English traditions.

It’s probably impossible to be anything like precise about this, but in the "old days" (i.e. before mass communication and media devices) but I’d guess that any player who could name and play well more than about 100 tunes would be the exception rather than the rule. How many tunes would you need to look after the local set dancing, ceilis, weddings and funerals? Not much more than 100 I’d reckon. An unadventurous session (and there are plenty of those around!) can easily get by on less than 50 or 60 tunes to fill an evening.

Why is it, when you go as a stranger to a session in a faraway town or country, that you’re invited to play a tune? I think it’s not only just being friendly and welcoming (although that is certainly present), there is also an unspoken element of "For God’s sake let’s have something new here!"