Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Anyone tried this? Perhaps in a tin can? Is it possible? Or should I carry on leaving all the shards of broken rosin all round the place on the assumption that I will always be able to find a piece somewhere (event though it will sharp as a razor and possible remove even more horse hair from the bow)? Or should I stop being such a cheapskate and buy a new piece? - but strings being the price they are, I want to save money where I can. Any other economy tips?

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Take up the bodhran. 😉

Melt down rosin and cast into a new cake?

I have done this. I use a piece of aluminum foil. Use a very low heat. It can be done.

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

"about 100 -120 deg C"

An ideal temperature for boiling bodhrans too. Goat’s Head/Skin Soup, anyone?

😉

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Hmm £3.50 or so… How long do you want to spend on this….

More seriously, if you can it might be worth trying a bow belonging someone who uses decent looking rosin, and if it’s a "nice" bow all the better. Just a few moments playing might be all it takes…..

(It would be courteous to wipe off your strings with a tissue or whatever first.)

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Go on Richard, push the boat out, buy yourself a nice new block.

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

I’d stick to a normal cake recipe if I were you.

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Got slagged a little by my friends, but I took some hardened/dried rosin (Hill dark), removed it from the green-foam-backed cloth and wrapped it with tinfoil around the sides and bottom, molding it / burnishing it tightly and leaving the top open so it resembled one of those votive candles. I put it on a baking tray and in the oven on “warm” (100˚F?) for about half an hour. It was very soft when I took it out, like a baked brie, and clear and shiny new on top. It seems to be working fine for me.

Some comments from the skeptical: “Did you ruin your oven?” (I don’t think so, the food’s been tasting fine). “There can’t be any oils left in the rosin!” (well, as I said, it seems to be working just fine). Bear in mind, these folks can be gear snobs and don’t really like Hill rosin anyway.

I haven’t actually melted broken & scrap pieces of rosin into a new cake, but I’d like to try. The hard part is finding a mold the right size. Maybe a spent one of those aluminum bases to votive candles I mentioned.

Hate to see stuff go to waste, and I feel so thrifty. 8-P

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

That Wikipedia article mentions the use of rosin in ‘mystic smoke’ (available in tubes from joke shops), which makes it look as if your fingers are on fire- a great addition to any performing musician’s toolkit!

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Haven’t tried this, but for melting I’ve heard that you get a new tealight candle, take out the candle and you have a perfect-size mould for the rosin.

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Ah yes, that’s it MH, I was thinking "votive" but tealight it is.

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Barley sugar ought to do the job nicely. It has a similar consistency to rosin - hard, brittle and sticky - and is not far off in colour, with the added advantages that it tastes good and it’s water-soluble. What more could you want?

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

But surely, what we all want to know is, can you smoke it?

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

All sounds a bit dodgy, doesn’t it?
- baking a cake, resin, aluminium foil…

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

I’ve done it, and it worked at first. But when I accidentally shattered that same rosin twice again, and melted it back together both times, there was a definite degradation in usefulness.
I tried to use it anyway, but my bow was just slippery and those little bowed triplets wouldn’t work at all. After suffering through this for a couple months, I got some nice new rosin. My bowed triplets are vastly improved. 🙂

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

Perhaps I’m just worried about getting stopped by the cops and found with suspicious fragments of resin-like substance in my pocket.

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

That DID happen to a friend of mine……totally baffled the plods. He should have told them to stick it in their pipes and smoke it !

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

"Perhaps I’m just worried about getting stopped by the cops and found with suspicious fragments of resin-like substance in my pocket."

As long as you’re not trying to melt it down in a spoon………..

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

This should be a submission for ""2007 Thread Title of the Year".

What do you think about that, Buster Bodhran?

"Bob, I used to melt fiddle rosin down in a spoon in my college days at keg parties. I was Kappa Phi rosin melter of the year back in 87…"

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

what i do is leave it in a fairy ring and the wee folk sorts it out

Re: Should I melt down all my broken bits of rosin and cast them into a new cake?

OK, everyone. I have decided that I will, for the greater good of string players throughout the world, share my rosin recycling secret. Set your oven to plate-warming temperature (say 170 F), pile all the scraps into a temporary container of your choice and now, wait for it, this is the important bit, crumble in about 10% by volume moth balls. Go away and practice for about an hour , then turn the oven off and let everything cool down. You’ll have a nice shiny new cake of resin which will also completely repel those pesky bow hair mites. No self-respectingbow mite wants to start chewing horse hair that has been rosined with this version!