Need help with pronouciation please…

Need help with pronouciation please…

Hi All πŸ™‚

I am currently learning the lovely tune "An Paistin Fionn" but I have no idea how to pronouce it.

All help muchly appreciated πŸ™‚

Regards
Morgana
(a.k.a. Ptollemy)

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

that’s rich coming from someone with the moniker of Ptollemy!

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

Moniker? Didn’t she used to play in a session with Bill Clinton.
Good embouchure, I’m told.

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

They tol’me there’d be days like this.

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

LOL — you lads, as Bridie once said, are hysterical…

And is anybody going to tell Ptollemy how to say "An Paistin Fionn"?

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

hi Morgana. tried to find paistin in my dictionary but think it may be just p

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

Thanks Chris, muchly appreciated! πŸ™‚

Regards
Morgana

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

I thought it might be Un Paws-cheen Finn, but how would I know?

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

‘specially with a name like "Domhniaill Mac Aoidh" πŸ™‚

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

Paiste is child. The suffix ‘in’ is a common dimunitive. As in potin, colleen and any number of other groovy things. The title of the tune means the fair-headed child.

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

Want to chime in with another pronunciation, Paul?

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

A brief tangential obsevation: ‘Pais’ is the Classical Greek word for ‘child’ or ‘boy’, giving rise, in its adjoining form, to such words as ‘paediatrician’.

cf. also Latvian ‘puisis’, Estonian ‘poiss’ = ‘boy’
…and ‘boy’, come to think of it.

Re: Need help with pronouciation please…

The Celtic languages and Classical Greek (among others) have a common ancestor in primitive Indo-European (which some scientists have reconstructed, apparently), so it’s not surprising that many common words have striking similarities over many languages - another one is Classical Greek "thugater" = English "daughter". Rules have been worked out showing how sounds change as they go from one language to another.
Trevor