Another Tune Name

Another Tune Name

Heard at a Fingal concert- James Keane,Randal Bays, Daithi Sproule:

X:1
T:gan ainm
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
d2AGFAD2|G2=cGEFG2|d2AGFAD2|Addcdefe|
d2AGFAD2|G2=cGEFG2|d2AGFAD2|Addcd4|
cdefg2fg|a2afgfed|cdefgfed|Addcd2ed|
cdefg2fg|a2afg2fg|afgefdec|Addcd4|

Re: Another Tune Name

The first part is definitely Maud Millar, the second part doesn’t sound close to what the boys played in concert.

The comments section of Maud Millar has some info on different names and such, and it seems it might also go by Sporting Molly.

I’d like to hear the tune James calls Sporting Molly on his CD "With Friends like These" but the sample on Amazon is not long enough.

I guess we’ll call it Maud.

Re: Another Tune Name

Yes, that 2nd part is a bit different. I think it depends whether this tune is something you want to record on an album, or play in sessions. If the latter, then you may have problems. You might want to recognise them as separate tunes, but your average session player won’t, when your tune doesn’t even come close to being in your top 1000-or-so session tunes. The only way you could get away with it is if none of the people in your local session knew Maud Millar. Then you’d have the space to introduce your tune and try and popularise it locally. You wouldn’t be able to do that in a session in Ireland though, Maud Millar’s too well known there. People would just automatically follow the A-part with the standard B-part of Maud Millar and you’d get drowned out, I think.

Re: Another Tune Name

I don’t think Maud MIllar (Fingal’s version or standard) is a common tune in this part of the states. When I played it a couple of weeks ago, everyone went quiet.

Followed by Sporting Paddy and The Morning Dew makes a pretty fair set.

Re: Another Tune Name

Thank’s Bill

X:020555
T: Ballykett
S: "Treoir"
Z: B.Black
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: D
fe|dcAG F2 D2|G2 AG EF G2|dcAG F2 D2|Addc d2 :|
ed|cdef g2 fg|agfa g2 ed|cdef g2 ec|Addc d2 ed |
cdef g2 fg|agfa g2 fg|afge fdec|Addc d2||

Re: Another Tune Name

From the Fingal album: it’s called Luke Kelly’s