New Irish Banjo Tutor

New Irish Banjo Tutor

Hi!
I’m just ready to launch my brand new Irish Banjo Tutor.

This is a great guide for all banjo players as it covers in great detail all aspects of playing the banjo from complete beginner to advanced. I’ve described in some detail the mechanics of holding the banjo to the exact method of plucking/picking correctly.

I have used simple rules, techniques and exercises to demonstrate how to achieve good rhythm, smooth picking and crisp trebles!

This fully illustrated 74 page book and double CD is available to purchase now exclusively from www.endascahill.com

Any questions or queries - I’m happy to answer 🙂

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

I’ve just put it on my Christmas wish list!

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Wow, this looks great, Enda!
I’m not going to risk putting this one on my wish list; I’ve just pre-ordered myself a copy.
For those in the UK, you can pre-order your copy from W.H.Smith or Blackwell for £21 (hopefully available from 15th December).

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

I ordered mine two weeks ago, and look forward to receiving it. And Patrick, I suspect one can find a good deal of useful information there, even for those who "don’t believe in reading music".

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Patrick,

You should take what a lot of these "dot haters" say with a pinch of salt.

They are likely to fall into one or more of the following categories…

a) They don’t know how to read music either because they’ve never tried, not had the opportunity, just too lazy , or just not able. The last one is very unlikely as I’m sure anyone could do so if they really wanted to make an efoort.

or

b) They don’t NEED to read music. Perhaps, they’ve always been able to play by ear. I knew a box player once who went along to Scots music classes as he thought it would help him with his sight reading. However, by the time he’d worked out "the dots" he already knew the tune by ear after it had been played through just a few times.

or

c)

They already know how to read music and possibly started out this way. Since then, they’ve developed the skills for learning by ear and realise this is the preferable way to pick up tunes in sessions etc. So, it’s often a case of
"Don’t do what I do or have done but do as I tell you!"

I’d imagine most of those who decry "reading music" on this site will probably fall into the last category.


Personally, I started off playing by ear and over the years have taught myself to read music. I’ve found it a very useful tool indeed but I still like to learn tunes by ear and I always think it’s important to listen to how others play a tune even if I’ve learned it from "the dots".

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Thanks Enda, I’m also looking forward to getting a copy plus the CDs

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Having heard and enjoyed your playing I have no doubt this will be a good thing… Congratulations and thanks for putting the effort into a result that will benefit many…

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

I don’t play the banjo, but I wouldn’t pass up the opportunity to learn from you and gain a better understanding…

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Thanks!

I hope it fulfills its purpose.

It’s something I’m very passionate about as I’d had the opportunity to help other banjo players and see them progress and it’s hugely rewarding and satisfying when it all comes together!

When you’ve had a chance to go through it definitely let me know any feedback or comments on it.

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Definitely something I’m passing on for a Christmas gift. I’ll buy it myself if I don’t get it. I’ve yet to find a great banjo tutorial so I’m anxious to check it out. I love your playing.

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

I don’t suppose Enda would consider being a donor for a finger transplant but perhaps genetic engineering will solve my banjo-playing problems someday 🙂

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Enda, with an endless curiosity I will be looking into it once it is released… The one thing that does come to mind is preventative medicine, something I feel every lesson should cover at one point or another. The greatest cause for injury is tension, and I have known sufferers from this in related passions ~ mandolin, banjo, etc… No one prepared them for how to survive the instrument and avoid the possibly pitfalls of not relaxing into it. It is so easy to try to hard and for the potential for ignored tensions to build up to a point where you either have to give up your love affair with the instrument or face the really difficult task of unlearning bad habits…

There isn’t an instrument that doesn’t suffer from such things, including the feet… Part of my teaching always starts with relaxing, and taking notice of what signs you might experience if you’re tensing up ~ fingers, hands, wrists, forearms, shoulders… I can only tell people not to ‘push’ it, to take it easy. I want folks to enjoy their passions till they drop, rather than having to drop their passions…

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Best of luck with it all Enda!

(Ádh mór ort!)

Murrough

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Hi Enda,

Sorry, I got distracted earlier. The book looks very interesting and I’ll certainly check it out. An endorsement from Mick Moloney is a good enough recommendation in itself.

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

hi Enda,
Im a fan of yours, have one of your CDs, and Clare FM play you quite often!
I will be ordering this and I looking forward to improving my banjo technique.
Two quick questions:
1/I live in Ireland, is the best way to order this product from your own website?
2/Whats the deal with the extra charge for the TAB Booklet - (waht is a TAB booklet?!) - and does the original package not include the CD and the music?

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Just ordered it myself -will be checking the post like a kid at christmas!

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Re: BanjoBongo

TAB is the simplest way to read music for someone that doesn’t read standard stave or the note names. I’m not an expert on it’s origins but it’s very popular in the US. It’s basically a diagram of the 4 strings of the banjo with numbers used to indicate which fret on which string should be played when.(!)

The Tutor is in standard stave notation with the names of the notes (a,c,d,e,g,) written underneath.

As there are a huge number of Tenor players in America I decided to produce all the tunes, exercises and musical illustrations in TAB format in an extra booklet. The cost of producing 2 separate Tutors would have made the project untenable. Therefore I’m selling the TAB booklet at cost price to facilitate these players.
The site is the best way to order the book or email me if there’s a problem with using paypal
Thanks!

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

Re Ceolachan and relaxing

Relaxing is the key! It’s a huge part of the book and effects everything from simple picking to trebles and playing at speed.

Breathe. You’d be amazed at how easy it is to stop breathing when you’re trying hard or concentrating.

Try running without breathing and see what happens! Starving the muscles in the hands and arms of oxygen when playing banjo is not much different

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

thanks Enda, thats helpful info, I dont need the tab book, now I know what it is. I will buy the tutor now, looking forward to learning lots from it!
I presume if I buy the tutor and the Humdinger CD off your website you will give a discount!

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

They’re at recession-beating prices!!

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

I was exited to get my copy of Enda’s tutorial this week.
I don’t consider myself to be all that skilled on the banjo, being mostly a wind IE whistle/flute player. On the the other hand, I get around it well enough to earn the occasional "prop" in sessions and I have a pretty good grip on trips and trebles (30 years of guitar playing has helped). I was at I point where need something (other than practice) to help me take it to the next level. It only took 5 minutes….as discovered for the first time that I don’t hold my right hand correctly….WOW! instant difference! No cramp, better pick control! I can’t really add much to what the venerable Mike Key’s already has written except to say THANKS ENDA!

I would also like to note that in my haste/exitment to order the tutorial I also orderd Enda and Paul Brock’s "Humdinger" CD and then I realized, at least according to Enda’s website, that the CD is only available if the order is being shipped to Ireland. I was very pleasantly suprised when it arrrived to New York state! Enda perhaps you did me a favor, if so thanks but if the general public can one stop shop you might want to remove that from the "shop" webpage on your site.

One question-Is there such a thing as a "duple." What I mean is sometimes instead of playing a "treble" I play what I call a "duple" for lack of a better word. Its basically a quick little "down-up", particullay I use it on hornpipes where the first note is longer and so I give it a liltle…I dunno what else to call it…"duple." I use it other times too, basically trying for the same kinda effect as a short roll has for wind players. (My approach to banjo being somewhat influenced by my wind playing) Is there a word for that or is it somethng else? Am I sounding totally ignorant here?

Paul

Re: New Irish Banjo Tutor

yeah ! I have a stupid question which makes me crazy at the moment. I play the banjo with 4 fingers since more than a year now, learned a lot of tunes, etc… BUT, I’ve learn only last week that I have to keep my fingers down when for exemple I go down the neck. Ahrite. But in some case I don’t know if i really have to do it all the time, cos it’s hard to play. Is everybody does that ? hard to explain myself actually. For exemple with the well known tune "the connaughtman’s ramble" at the third note, do I have to keep my finger there (F#) ALL the first part?? Dunno if you get me …