scales

scales

Can anyone tell me which notes make up the pentatonic scales in D, G and C for improvisation on the whistles ?

Re: scales

ha ha ha ha

Posted .

Re: scales

I do learn the tunes when playing ITM, I think that is the ONLY way to learn ITM, but when playing other types of music, it would be nice to be able to improvise, especially when it is a jamming session and learning the `tune` would be useless if not impossible.
Thanks patrick toms for your help.
llig leachim, is ha ha ha ha a scale too ?

Re: scales

Bb a

Posted .

Re: scales

The easy way to remember the notes of any pentatonic scale is to identify the 1st,2nd,3rd, 5th,6th,8th notes of the normal scale this will work for any scale.

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boatman, I have been hear long enough to feel that I understand the llig-uage. If I am not mistaken, ‘ha ha ha ha,“ if I can be forgiven for translating it loosely, in a way that is appropriate for all ages, means, “Are you sure you are at the right website for that particular question?” And there is a subtle undertone of, “Please don’t ever come to my session with that behavior!“

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Thanks Al, that gave me a right good giggle.

Posted .

Re: scales

If you need the names of the notes, you can’t play well enough yet to
improvise

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So what

Posted .

Re: scales

The above pentatonic scales are often called ‘chinese’ because of the sound when the notes are played in order, which sounds eastern. Blues often uses MINOR pentatonic scales. The easiest on the whistle would be Emin pentatonic and Amin pentatonic. The notes used are the tonic, third, fourth, fifth, seventh. So Emin pentatonic would be E G A B D E and Amin pentatonic would be A C D E G A. I’m not an expert on this though and suggest you google for more info.

Maybe you could try it too llig - you never know, you might even find it FUN.

Re: scales

gimmer is right.

Sing Do, Re, Mi, (skip Fa), Sol, La, (skip Ti), Do, and you will have a pentatonic scale in any key.

Re: scales

Boatman: your question has no easy answer because there are many possible pentatonic scales for any given key/tonic note.

Take a certain scale, for example D Major:

D E F# G A B C# D

Now, not counting the duplicated D, remove ANY two notes and you have a pentatonic scale.

For example, remove the C# and G (the fourth and the seventh) and you get the following pentatonic scale:

D E F# A B (D)

There is a very well-known tune in this very pentatonic scale: Amazing Grace.

What you’re probably thinking of, possibly, is the pentatonic scale which crops up in a lot of traditional Scottish tunes, and Irish as well, a scale which is neither Major nor minor as it lacks both the 3rd and the 6th. It does have the flat 7th. In D it would be:

D E G A C (D)

A different pentatonic scale, which has the minor 3rd but lacks the 2nd, is common in Native American music but there are European tunes which also use it. In D it would be:

D F G A C (D)

There’s a great hymn tune in that mode, the name of which escapes me at the moment.

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Just trying to figure out llig’s enigmatic post ‘Bb a’ (fifth from top) – llig, did you mean ‘B flat a’?

Re: scales

I think llig probably meant Bb A# …

“The easy way to remember the notes of any pentatonic scale is to identify the 1st,2nd,3rd, 5th,6th,8th notes of the normal scale this will work for any scale.”

An even easier way is to identify the 4th and 7th degrees, and leave them out 😉

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I think he meant ‘B a’, if he was referring to the German usage of ‘h’. B flat is called ‘B’ in Germany.

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“An even easier way is to identify the 4th and 7th degrees and leave them out.”

Well, that works for ONE of the many possible pentatonic scales, the one Amazing Grace and Kesh Jig are in, but not for the pentatonic scale that so many Scottish tunes are in which leaves out the 3rd and the 6th, or the one that leaves out the 2nd and the 6th, or any of the other combinations.

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I suspect those examples are just different modes of the exact same scale, the omitted degrees being the same notes at the 4th and 7th of the parent scale in all cases.

Of course, it’s all a matter of (how you define) degree and scale 😉

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Yet again, there are also many parent scales to choose from!

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Just to confuse things even more, what about the scales with the “trick” notes - notes halfway between cnat and c#, or fnat and f# being the commonest.