Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Does anyone here have any experience in using pop filters in studio recording Low Whistle? Does it help eliminate white noise, breathiness et cetera?

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

no, not really. It takes out spikes in the signal (or "pops")

digital recording generally drops white noise

but breathiness is more the windscreen on your mic and mic placement

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Not really. Proper mic placement and choice of mic goes much further in eliminating those aspects. Good technique and a good instrument do even more.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

If you are talking about a mesh filter positioned in front of the microphone, my experience is that it does make make a difference. More so than the microphone windscreen, if it has one. I would agree though that it is important to get mic position right. You want to find the sweet spot and site the pop screen as a guide to the musician to where to position their indtrument..

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

instrument

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

I find it makes me sound like a boy band.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Whistle and flute should be miked from above from a boom for recording. That eliminates the "plosives," as they are called.

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Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

The other thing that’s more often than not layed on heavily for a low whistle is compression. The most obvious give away of this is when you hear much more breathyness on the low notes

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Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

I found that those mesh sunshade gizmo’s for car windows make good pop filters, I gaffa taped one to a spare mic stand and placed it in front of the recording mic. Of course a decent condenser mic would probably be the answer.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

It is true that most engineers use popscreens (tights - or pantyhose if your a yank - stretched across a wire coat hanger) just to keep amateurs from spitting into their expensive microphones. They make no difference to the sound at all.

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Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Pair of tights and a metal coathanger will give you a pop filter that’s just as effective as a commercial one. More difficult to position and not so pretty, but it will allow you to experiment without spending money (mind you, they don’t cost much).

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

ha ha, probably just a millisecond difference in us clicking "post", And yet your post now looks daft, he he he he

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Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Cross post and different expiriences I think.
Believe me, they do make an easily detectable and positive difference to vocals. Pop screen is a good name for them because that’s the sound they stop. I use a pop screen when recording my wife’s playing and it works No effect on white noise or breathiness though.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Sorry, I meant no difference to the sound of a whistle, not vocals. Yes they stop the p

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Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Thanks for all your posts. I suspected that the pop filter might not iron the breathiness. Of course, this unwanted breathiness and poor sound quality may have a lot to do with the whistle (Chieftain Low D), and inferior playing.

However, any other suggestions regarding recording of Low Whistle(s) is and will be appreciated.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Just in case the above post sounds arrogant, I would point out that I am the player, not the engineer.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Might be worth backing away from the mic a bit and turning up the input, but you need a quiet room.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

try to keep a consistant distance from the mic. Don’t rock back and forth or lean away at times and that sort of thing

then the engineer can get a good level

and when you sound check for him, play as loud as you think you might play during the recording and make sure to give him a sample of the low and the high register during the sound check.

other than that, the engineer will tell you if he needs you to do something particular.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

To be honest I would disagree about the distance from the mic. With low whistle it’s important to use good mic technique while recording as well as live. There is a fair difference in the volume of the low and high notes and by leaning in for the bottom notes and pulling away for the higher notes (slightly) it will give a more balanced sound. But experience it really need to do that well.

Compression, as Llig says, plays a big part in low whistle recordings but without good mic technique you have to compress it too much which gives the whistle quite an unnatural sound. Also, resist the temptation for lots of reverb or delay, a tiny touch is best. The reverb on the final overall mastered track is usually about all it needs.

Yes to the pop sheild.

Also, recording is when most people realize they should have paid a bit extra and bought an Overton.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Sinocal: Are you recording in a studio or is it a home recording?

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

I’m recording in a studio. Previous efforts have resulted in a surreal, whale-noise type sound. There does, indeed, seem to be too much reverb on the recording. The set-up for my whistling seems to be the same as for the voice, minus the pop screen.
I agree about the Overton.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

Bogman is right about the leaning in for the low notes and back a bit for the upper register. You will see singers do similar things like move the mic away when they start to really belt it out and such

but if you don’t have enough experience working with a mic, its best to stay still so the engineer can get a level. If you are moving all the time when he is trying to get his levels, you make his job more difficult.

thats why I said to just sit still. Alot of times I find that accoustic musicians have a difficult time recording because it is an unfamiliar situation and they don’t really understand how all the gizmos work, so they do things that undermine what the engineer is trying to do.

not being aware of the distance to the mic is one of the more common mistakes.

so if you can manage that distance to your benefit, then do that. But if you aren’t sure what to do, just sit still and let the engineer deal with the levels.

Re: Pop Filters in Low Whistle Recording?

I’d say say a lot of times I find that acoustic "folk" musicians have a difficult time recording because they have never really listened or paid attention to the actual acoustic sounds they make. "Jeasus? Do I really sound that crap?" Yep

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