Disaster

Disaster

I have a Copley and Boegli blackwood flute.

It breaks down to three pieces. The connection at the top (between the B hole and the embouchure hole) has always been a little tight. Because of this I try to keep it well lubricated with cork grease.

Last night after playing, I notices that a small area, a couple of millimeters, of the cork had been scraped off and the wood was showing through.

Has this ever happened to anyone? Is this an issue? Should I get it repaired immediately? I certainly don’t want to continue scraping more and more of the cork off.

Re: Disaster

It happens, and is easily repaired. You can either send it back to Dave for repair, or find a reputable woodwind repair shop and have them do it. Clarinets have the same sort of corked joints, so any decent woodwind repair guy or gal should be able to fix it for you.

It’s also not that hard to do yourself if you’re at all handy.

As far as urgency—it’s only an issue if it leaks air, or if more cork tears and jams when you put the joint together and then sticks. Better to fix it than worry, but not a life-threatening issue if it’s just a small wear spot.

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Re: Disaster

Thanks - I’m grateful to be set a bit at ease.

Re: Disaster

I owned a Copley and Boegli once, too. My first serious flute. Dave is great to work with and offers great service on upkeep and repairs. Call or email him to see what sort of turnaround time he can give you. Always nice to have the original maker give the flute a going over, check the other cork joints, etc. His web site has contact info.

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Re: Disaster

And threading them is always an alternative. I use waxed silk thread. Do be careful to get the fit right, i.e. not too tight bearing in mind that thread swells when wet (as does cork…).

But if the flute was corked, then recorking it is usually best and, as mentioned above, any woodwind repairer (i.e. clarinets etc) will be able to do this competently.

Re: Disaster

it’s just a matter of recorking. My recorders require that one every twenty years or so depending on howmuch they are used.

A good instrument repair person should be able to deal with that at a modest cost.