hard to read some sheet music

hard to read some sheet music

I wear glasses and I find some sheet music too dark to comfortably read while I’m playing; in other words, there’s not enough contrast between the notes and the lines. Does anyone else have this problem? Would enlarging the sheet music help? Thanks much…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

You could also try what dyslexics find useful, a coloured background, try light yellows and oranges, and mybe a dark brown instead of black, not increasing the contrast but softening it. Black on white causes problems for a lot of folks. Good luck…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

baylady, if your question is for real, and you’re not just trying to stir up a bit of “fun” on this forum, then I suggest you do a search of the discussions for the words “learning ear sheet music”, and you’ll see what kind of hornets nest you may have gotten yourself into…

But my short answer to your question is that instead of enlarging the sheet music, why don’t you try shrinking it down so that it’s so small that you don’t have a chance of reading it at all, and start relying upon your ears and brain. Because the beauty in traditional music does not come directly from the notes, which is about all that you can get from a printed source. The beauty comes from how those notes are played. And to get that, you have to hear it… It’s not the path of least resistance, but it is the best path to success.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ears first, always, but some folks use the crutch of sheetmusic to help them acclimatize. It helps to know that crutch can end up crippling your music too, so they need to be seen for what they are ~ a skeleton ~ minus living tissue, muscle, blood and a beating heart… The dots will NEVER give you that, but they can be a useful tool just the same…

The cauldron is still cold, but the stirring has begun, stirred not shaken… 😉

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Sad story ~ I know one lovely lady that always wanted the music, and she bought an instrument and she started learning it and playing it, from sheets. She was addicted to sheetmusic, but she got some pleasure out of her pursuit ~ until her eyesight went. She was so bound up with the dots that she couldn’t imagine anything else and she stopped, she sold her instrument, she gave away her sheetmusic, and she’s never played another note since…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Imagine not being able to speak without reading what you are saying off a page?

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I found that playing guitar in Texas bar rooms cured me of depending on the sheet. Hard to see the beer bottles flying up to the band stand when you have your head down, you know

Re: hard to read some sheet music

ceol, careful, or people will start calling you a troll too! 😛

I don’t mind the occasional use of the dots to learn the bones of a tune (especially once you’ve got some experience of playing the music under your belt). But as a crutch while you’re trying to play it, you’ll just end up hobbling around, and that crutch will actually hinder your progress, not help it - even though it feels *easier* at the time.

Argh! Here I go getting sucked in again! I reject your stirring, and replace it a blender!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

replace it *with* a blender, even.

Good point, llig. Imagine trying to be a proffessional watercolor artist, but you can only paint by numbers…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ceolachan, thank you for your suggestion re page colors etc….I’ll try it!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

How ’bout trying to read without knowing the words….

Re: hard to read some sheet music

“Blender!” ~ Sorry, no electricity or plugs here…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

“How ’bout trying to read without knowing the words….” ~ Baylady

Yes, that’s exactly what Llig and Reverend are saying…and I’m in full agreement…

Best of luck baylady!

Words, grammar, syntax, etc…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I understand completely what everyone is saying about learning by ear, but personally I learn by using the dots a little, and it does help me as I’m starting out. It helps me find the mode and the notes. Listening to the tune first tells me what tunes I like and want to learn first, then I use the dots a bit to get familiar with the proper notes. I use the sheet for maybe 15 minutes, then I basically throw the sheet away after that and rely on my ears. For me it depends on the tune. I learned a couple where I didn’t use the dots at all. I guess everyone is different and my method of learning tunes will evolve as I play more sessions.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Thank you…. but trial and error is too time-consuming for a novice player….I prefer the notation.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Jimmy B…..your approach is very similar to mine……

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Well, yes, it’s not been a bad way to go for me thus far, but I do agree with the general sentiment that you’re best bet for learning the “style” of the music (Irish, Scottish, etc.) is by playing over and over, and then over again, without the sheet, and this is time-consuming. I’m ready to spend years getting it down, and if you’re looking for a quick way to get the music down, I’m not sure such a thing exists. I’m not saying that you are, of course.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I’m not looking for a ‘quick’ way to learn the music….. seeing the notes first is just more efficient for me, as I’m a visual learner. Then I go from there….
Thanks for your response…..play on…..🙂

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I know some people who want to learn to play Irish music but they don’t want to spend too much time doing it, so they think they can use a book and sit around and play. I’ve tried to tell them that they’ll never learn to play it properly from a book, and they politely say they’re sure that’s true, but they’re going to use the book anyway. And I wonder why they bother. It’s kind of a mystery to me.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

They bother because that’s the way it suits them best……and because people have different learning styles……visual, auditory, hands-on and so on…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Yeah, well, you should hear them play—they sound like they’re reading notes off a page. No lilt, no life in their playing. They have no concept of variations. And they certainly can’t play with me, even if they know the tune. They’re stuck to their book. It’s very limiting for them.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Well, in my case, it was because I didn’t want to show up to my first session empy-handed, so to speak. It did help me get the notes down. After that it’s a matter of repetition and playing more and more and more, preferrably in-session. I’m sure I’ll play a passable “The Wind That Shakes the Barley” sooner or later. I’m fully prepared fo it to take a few years before I’m a respectable sessioner.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

But not all fiddlers want to play in sessions…..their ‘limited’ playing ability may give them as much pleasure as your playing does for you. As for me, it has to sound good to ‘my’ ear…..

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Kennedy, I’m not limited to my book. I use it as a useful guide at first, then I essentially throw it away. I understand there is no substitute for knowing the tune by ear and learning to play it that way. Try to understand that those of us who have learned music in other ways in the past, and who have discovered ITM without having a cultural attachment to the music growing up, have to start in some way and adapt from there. Some make the adaptation gracefully and some don’t, and clearly you’ve played with some who haven’t. I should think that a certain amount of acceptance of the coming and going of people into the fold of ITM is necessary for the music to continue and thrive, and that in turn requires some patience for some of us to come around. I figure if I respect the ettiquete of the session and keep at it I’ll do just that. Is that not acceptable?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

But not all fiddlers want to play in sessions…..their ‘limited’ playing ability may give them as much pleasure as your playing does for you. As for me, it has to sound good to ‘my’ ear…..

Re: hard to read some sheet music

baylady: you don’t have to play in sessions, but the tunes still have to sound a certain way for you to be playing them properly. If you can’t vary them each time through, if you can’t make them sound close to the way traditional players make them sound, then you’re not playing them properly. They might sound good to you, but that’s not the same as what I’m talking about. If you’re fine with that, then that’s good that you’re happy, but that’s not what most of the people who try to learn to play traditional music are trying to do.

JimmyB, I didn’t grow up listening to trad music either. I just think that learning by ear produces the best result, and my experiences with my own learning and with people I know have borne that out. You sound like you will be fine without books once you learn to trust your ear.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

If your problem is in reading stuff you have printed off The Session, try copying the abc and pasting to this: http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html Then print it out from the pdf version which produces much better notes.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Bredna…..your suggestion worked like a charm….thank you!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Kennedy….I do understand your point that when playing with others, there has to be a standard of play. All I am saying is that there is merit to using notes to get started….even the great Canadian fiddler Calvin Volrath speaks of the frustration and time lost in trying to find the right notes through experimentation. I have a poor ‘ear.’….so I make up for it by going through my strength, which is visual….or else I would be too discouraged to continue. Thanks for your response.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

baylady, if you’re using transcriptions you find here on this site to learn your tunes, be careful. They’re often wrong, or they’re quite different from the way you would hear someone play them.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Kennedy, thanks for that bit of advice….I can tell you have a passion for your music!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ha! The normally tactful Reverend firing with both guns today! It must be because his beloved Denver Broncos are 6-0. That record is far more surprising and unlikely than this bimonthly and utterly predictable yellow-board rant about ears vs. dots. You can almost set your watch by it.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I’ll consider myself warned! hehe

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Talk about dots. I started out with braille music for classical violin but realized memorizing two measures at a time until I had the tune was absolutely stupid when I could just listen to it a few times and get it. And of course variations are the heart of tunes …

Re: hard to read some sheet music

underthetoaster, I commend you for your persistance…..I’ve heard that when one is without a particular sense, other senses become sharper. Would you agree?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I too am extremely visual, nearly an eidetic memory. But music is aural–nothing else. The sooner I learned to really listen and learn with my ears, the sooner I learned how to make music.

Like learning to swim–you can’t do it without getting wet. You can mimic the strokes all you want in the air on on the ground, but none of it matters until you’re actually in the water.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Remarkably restrained exchange for this discussion board, given the topic at hand!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

back to the question at hand,

I have graduated lenses and I cannot read music through the top (strongest) or bottom (reading) depending upon if the music is in a stand or on the table.

Also, do you have an astigmatism? That can skew how the notes look.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Yes ..good point….I do have astigmatism.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I am convinced playing with the dots uses a different part of the brain
than playing by ear. When I play with dots on an instrument I know
well - it is like touch typing - the note goes straight into my fingers. I
don’t have to think of what it is. On the fiddle, it’s not quite that simple
but close to it if you’re only playing in first position.

Playing by ear you have to think more about the musical structure.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

“you have to think more about the musical structure”. Doing that its not exactly like touch typing then is it ? Its the words that go straight to the fingers as well as the letters. Its still the best analogy I know though. Maybe “are able to think about musical structure”, like thinking about what one is writing about when typing.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

grumbingolwoman - your comment makes me think that you don’t have astigmatism. I do - it doesn’t do what you say.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I got a second pair of glasses for my computer work. I found that they help a lot when I read sheet music as it is roughly the same distance. BTW I’ve got an excuse because apart from ITM I play in an orchestra setting regularly.

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

David, you completely missed my point - it’s almost like you
can’t read. But fortunately, I don’t care.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I totally accept that people have different learning styles and I am a very strong visual learner and a terrible auditory learner. When people give me driving directions somewhere, there is no way I will ever remember them and not get horribly lost unless I write them down. However, when I started learning Irish music I worked my a*se off to learn how to learn by ear for the all reasons other posters above have set out. And now I can do it. Wasn’t easy then but it makes things easier now. If I can learn to do it, anyone can. “I’m just not an auditory learner” isn’t a reason to rely on the dots.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I’m so pleased I took the trouble (in my 50’s) to learn how to read tunes from the dots (but I also learn by ear). Anyone reading the discussions on this topic might think that the dots are Satan’s daisy chain and should be avoided at all costs - they’re missing out. Baylady is perfectly entitled to play Celtic airs and laments from sheet music in Nova Scotia - I’m sure it’s a beautiful place to be. She didn’t ask if it was right to do so. For reading music at music stand distance I currently have a cheap pair of specs at 1.75 diopters - these are perfect. Varifocals are hopeless for reading music and strong reading glasses are too strong. You’ve got to get a pair that are just right for the distance.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Anyone who reads the discussions here on this topic and comes to the conclusion that the dots are Satan’s daisy chain have not understood the simple arguments against the use of it.

And anyone who reads the discussions here on this topic and comes to the conclusion that those of us who argue against the use of the dots think that they are Satan’s daisy chain have not understood those simple arguments.

Another language analogy:
Imagine that you are a very good English speaker. You are intelligent, highly literate and well read. But you cannot speak a word of French. However, you gain great pleasure from reading French poetry. You don’t understand a word of it. You just like the sound of it. Which of course is nothing like the sound of a French speaker reading it, but that doesn’t matter.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Literacy is an interesting metaphor. If I’m not mstaken to be truly literate or have a high degree of literacy necessitates you both speak and read at an advanced level. In language terms, I think reading informs speaking and vice versa. They’re two separate realms but at some point they begin to inform one another.

If you ONLY relied on your ears would you be literate? Certainly you could speak and understand and be understood, but without the reading component something would be missing.

Could the same be said the for the approach to music, and esp. Irish traditional music?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Hup. Sorry. I misread.

But should your anology be with copy-typing, not simply touch typing ? A good copy-typist can carry on a conversation about something completely different, maybe having their attention drawn to the source if something unusual crops up.

I was thinking of playing by ear as more like touch-typing whilst composing the text, or putting down something already thought out, or remembered. The fingers find their own way most of the time, and without the need to think about how to spell most words.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Literate has two meanings:
1. the straightforward ability to read and write.
2. to be learned.

You can get stuck when you extend language analogies too far with music. But basically, yes, you can be a traditional musician of the highest order and not have the ability to read and write. You can be fully literate with the music (in the 2nd sense of the word) and not be able to read and write notation.

But I think a better word than literate with regards to the language analogy is “articulate”. I think it is possible to be a great English speaker, a very articulate person, and not have the ability to read and write English. Though as you say and I agree, reading informs speaking and vice versa. They’re two separate realms but at some point they begin to inform one another.

But being an articulate musician with regards to traditional Irish music is a different matter. For there is no information within the written notes that can help with articulation. With language, a great deal of what makes a person articulate is having a good vocabulary, and reading helps with this immensely. Not so with Irish music. for none of the vocabulary, the articulations, can be found on the paper.

(I hope the dunces who don’t understand that words can have separate meanings don’t chime in and ruin this thread)

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

51 ~ just to take it that step further… 😉

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I like thinking of it as an oral tradition ~ speaking through the instrument, but acquired primarily through experience, from others, rather than from ink on paper…

I too find that those note-bound produce notes in sequence, not music to my ear, more like a child being forced to read from a book they’ve never seen before ~ clumsy, broken, stilted, without life… But, with experience and guidance, they can go away, learn the story behind the words, the emotions, the nuances, and come back and do a decent performance, as too with dramatic works ~ but, that is best done with those who already have invested time and effort in that art, including using their ears, and through the guidance of informed and gifted others…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I’m assuming you mean oral and aural.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Taking the language analogy a step further, my kid’s suzuki violin teacher likes to play Irish music once in a while and does it exclusively from sheet music. She articulates every notes as written. It sounds like an Oxford educated thespian trying to read a script written by Brendan Behan. It just sounds odd somehow.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Hup>

“I am convinced playing with the dots uses a different part of the brain than playing by ear.”

Yes! It’s music. It goes in your earhole, not your eyehole.

WRONG HOLE! 😛

Re: hard to read some sheet music

You know, Hup is onto something here.

We’re trying to replicate what we hear with our hands. Our brains are sending sense input from the ears to the hands, and mouths if you’re one of them drooly fluter/whistler types, God love ya.

Inserting the eyes in the process is an extra step.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Come on, Michael, make some attempt at grammar in your denouncements! We’ll think you’re arguing for total illiteracy. “Anyone…have not understood”; “dots (plural)…arguments against the use of it”. I was merely making the point that this lady, who is harmlessly and myopically trying to read some sheet music for Celtic airs and laments and who is far away in Cape Breton is hardly going to be a danger to you and your ear-learned jigs and reels in Edinburgh, and should be sympathised with rather than castigated!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

MG

Articulate is a great word. I see what you mean. Yes, you could be a great speaker or ‘speechifier’ I suppose, but not necessarily a great writer, and vice versa. [

Articulation in music though…I think you said in some thread of months back something along the lines of this: say you took a simple sentence. I think you said there could be many ways of emphasising the words in that sentence .

I was thinking, if we took the lines:

But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.

… and if all of the approx 60,000 members of The Session here were to record those lines and submit to something like Sound Lantern for general perusal, it’s a sure bet we would ALL emphasize different aspects of the sentences above.

The meaning never changes [of the words] but the way we say or articulate the words [dots?] would tease out [or more likely totally obfuscate] the beauty of the language’s music.

In other words, how we articulate Shakespeare’s written work either makes the language –and the thoughts/images that that language evokes– come alive, or it doesn’t.

In the same way dots can only be –at best surely– the vaguest approximation of what an traditional irish tune might sound like…..dots can’t convey any of the articulation necessary to make that music come alive. How “speak it” in other words in our own styles that makes it live…that makes others excited and want to pick up a fiddle or pipes or whistle and emulate what they’re hearing because it’s so energizing [which leads to the promulgation, spread and interest in the music surely].

To make the music live and to understand how it lives it seems to me you’d need a deep familiarity with the live music itself and how musicians play it either in sessions or on records or cds or whatever.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Sorry about my grammar, I never went to grammar school.

But I did sympathise with the lady. I said good for her to gain great pleasure from reading French poetry. And that it doesn’t matter that it doesn’t sound like a French speaker reading it.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

…and this is not the 19th century. We have the internet and MP3s. Even if you live at the North Pole there’s no excuse for listening to music and using your ears.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

for ‘not’ I guess

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Okay, okay, okay! I give up. You win. I will never, never, NEVER use sheet music again as long as I live. 🙂

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Richard said it best [thank you]….I simply want to play airs and laments, in my beautiful corner of the world, without being made to feel inadequate because I don’t play by ear.
As art is in the eye of the beholder, I believe music is in the ear of the listener. My music gives me much pleasure and isn’t that the whole point?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Yes, it is the point that it gives you much pleasure. And just as long as it continues to give you pleasure, it doesn’t matter that you don’t understand it

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ilig leahcim… …you may have an understanding of the music that I don’t have ….but you don’t have the spirit or heart of a musician; if you did, you would encourage other musicians, not bring them down.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I don’t think anyone is intending to make you feel inadequate. The French poetry analogy is a good one – in the grand scheme of life it doesn’t matter that you can read French poetry without understanding French so long as you enjoy it. Hell, I was in choir all through high school and we sung loads of Latin songs. I don’t think anyone in that choir had a word of Latin. But it isn’t the same thing as being fluent in French (or Latin). So long as you’re enjoying it, whatever. But take on board what people here are saying as well.

I once sat at a session, of sorts, where everyone was reading out of “The Fiddler’s Fakebook” and they’d call sets by saying, “Kesh Jig and Morrison’s. Page 167.” Okay, awkward! And I got told off for starting a set without calling the tunes first and wasn’t in the book anyway. However, everyone was enjoying themselves immensely. If asked, they would have been the first people to tell you it wasn’t a “proper” session but it was what they wanted to do. More power to them (suffice to say, I only went to this the once). If they’d wanted to be more ambitious or push themselves with their music to attain more fluency in it, they’d need to rethink how they were playing and learning the tunes, but they were quite content doing things the way they were doing them. But hey, not everyone wants to be fluent. That’s fair enough.

Right, so what gets me is when people say, “I can’t learn by ear” to justify relying on the dots. Unless you have some sort of physical impairment, then you probably can learn by ear if you really want to do it.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

> I don’t think anyone is intending to make you feel inadequate.

I disagree. I think baylady was absolutely right to call llig on a typically graceless comment.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I agree with you ,Ed. And there are others here who insist that if you don’t do things their way you are doing them wrong. Very narrow minded.

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Yes, that’s exactly what was being said on here, well done folks. [sighs deeply, bangs head on desk, shrugs, goes out for a smoke]

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I was playing at a party last week with a violin player who is in her sixties. Probably been playing since school days and quite a sweet violin player too. Over the years I’ve played with this particular player on many occasions. However I also know that the dots are never far from her fiddle. Somebody asked for one of those old evergreen tunes from our infant school days like Peggy O’Neill or Molly Malone. I played both tunes as a waltz and as I played she spent most of my rendition looking through her vast collection of sheets for the music. Just as well we were not asked for ‘Happy Birthday’.
I thought how sad is that?
I taught myself to read the dots many moons ago and found it a useful part of my musical armory, but having to look for music for a run of the mill mickey mouse tune…ye Gods.
What is it? Is it lack of confidence or the need to have a prop. Is it a certain laziness of the brain to remember the bones of a tune or am I just blessed with good retention???????.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Llig graceless? He’s just being honest I think. And he’s right of course.

I know when When I get tired playing beautiful Irish airs I like to read French poetry even if I don’t know a damn thing about it…I like this one by Beaudelaire, .

Une Charogne

Rappelez-vous l’objet que nous vîmes, mon âme,
Ce beau matin d’été si doux:
Au détour d’un sentier une charogne infâme
Sur un lit semé de cailloux,

Les jambes en l’air, comme une femme lubrique,
Brûlante et suant les poisons,
Ouvrait d’une façon nonchalante et cynique
Son ventre plein d’exhalaisons.

Le soleil rayonnait sur cette pourriture,
Comme afin de la cuire à point,
Et de rendre au centuple à la grande Nature
Tout ce qu’ensemble elle avait joint;

Et le ciel regardait la carcasse superbe
Comme une fleur s’épanouir.
La puanteur était si forte, que sur l’herbe
Vous crûtes vous évanouir.

Les mouches bourdonnaient sur ce ventre putride,
D’où sortaient de noirs bataillons
De larves, qui coulaient comme un épais liquide
Le long de ces vivants haillons.

Tout cela descendait, montait comme une vague
Ou s’élançait en pétillant;
On eût dit que le corps, enflé d’un souffle vague,
Vivait en se multipliant.

Et ce monde rendait une étrange musique,
Comme l’eau courante et le vent,
Ou le grain qu’un vanneur d’un mouvement rythmique
Agite et tourne dans son van.

Les formes s’effaçaient et n’étaient plus qu’un rêve,
Une ébauche lente à venir
Sur la toile oubliée, et que l’artiste achève
Seulement par le souvenir.

Derrière les rochers une chienne inquiète
Nous regardait d’un oeil fâché,
Epiant le moment de reprendre au squelette
Le morceau qu’elle avait lâché.

— Et pourtant vous serez semblable à cette ordure,
À cette horrible infection,
Etoile de mes yeux, soleil de ma nature,
Vous, mon ange et ma passion!

Oui! telle vous serez, ô la reine des grâces,
Apres les derniers sacrements,
Quand vous irez, sous l’herbe et les floraisons grasses,
Moisir parmi les ossements.

Alors, ô ma beauté! dites à la vermine
Qui vous mangera de baisers,
Que j’ai gardé la forme et l’essence divine
De mes amours décomposés!

— Charles Baudelaire

A Carcass

My love, do you recall the object which we saw,
That fair, sweet, summer morn!
At a turn in the path a foul carcass
On a gravel strewn bed,

Its legs raised in the air, like a lustful woman,
Burning and dripping with poisons,
Displayed in a shameless, nonchalant way
Its belly, swollen with gases.

The sun shone down upon that putrescence,
As if to roast it to a turn,
And to give back a hundredfold to great Nature
The elements she had combined;

And the sky was watching that superb cadaver
Blossom like a flower.
So frightful was the stench that you believed
You’d faint away upon the grass.

The blow-flies were buzzing round that putrid belly,
From which came forth black battalions
Of maggots, which oozed out like a heavy liquid
All along those living tatters.

All this was descending and rising like a wave,
Or poured out with a crackling sound;
One would have said the body, swollen with a vague breath,
Lived by multiplication.

And this world gave forth singular music,
Like running water or the wind,
Or the grain that winnowers with a rhythmic motion
Shake in their winnowing baskets.

The forms disappeared and were no more than a dream,
A sketch that slowly falls
Upon the forgotten canvas, that the artist
Completes from memory alone.

Crouched behind the boulders, an anxious dog
Watched us with angry eye,
Waiting for the moment to take back from the carcass
The morsel he had left.

— And yet you will be like this corruption,
Like this horrible infection,
Star of my eyes, sunlight of my being,
You, my angel and my passion!

Yes! thus will you be, queen of the Graces,
After the last sacraments,
When you go beneath grass and luxuriant flowers,
To molder among the bones of the dead.

Then, O my beauty! say to the worms who will
Devour you with kisses,
That I have kept the form and the divine essence
Of my decomposed love!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

There is a lot to be said for learning some simple tunes by ear. It can help you learn to blend in with other musicians . In a way its actually a short cut in that its far more immediate:….hear… do.
I also think its a good idea to listen to traditional players, be they Cape Breton Players or Irish or Scottish etc to hear some different ways they can be interpreted. There are many many ways to play a tune, there is no need to become another ‘Irish/[clone]’ fiddler. Take on board what influences you choose to, enjoy your music.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Blend? Did someone say blend?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

If someone said, “Sing Happy Birthday To You”, and you said, “I Can’t, unless I have the music and words in front of me.” You’d be thought of as a bit strange. You’d be thought even odder if you said “I am a musician”.
There’s nothing wrong with using written music to help you learn “Happy Birthday”, but to demand it in order to play the thing would be pretty sad, even more so if you claimed to be a musician.
Irish music is a selection of short dance pieces.
Until you internalise those basic (and simple) melodies, you can’t do anything with them to make them interesting/exciting. Or to invest them with any meaning.
Hard, maybe, but true….

Re: hard to read some sheet music

David_h - yes, I’ll buy your analogy - it works really well with concertina

Re: hard reading sheet music

“My music gives me much pleasure and isn’t that the whole point?” ~ baylady

I think the point most here are trying to make is that you could have so much more pleasure if you moved beyond the limitations of those bones, if you gave up following the dots and came from behind the sheets to go direct…

I find notation useful and interesting, fully realizing its limitations and faults, and having dealt with its addicts.

I hope nothing I’ve said here has been taken as a personal put down, as that has not been my intent. If you’re new to here, then you’d be new to the great oracle Llig, which I pronounce in the Welsh fashion, and with a smile. Personally I like his passion on subjects like this, but please, don’t take it personal. I wouldn’t contribute to this thread at all if I wasn’t interested and didn’t care about this passion you share with the rest of us, and the risk you took in opening up here. To repeat, I’m not completely down on music notation in all its many forms, but I know well its limitations and its ill effects. I’ve worked hard to help others to break that addiction, and I’ve also helped others to learn to read music, and move beyond that. It can be just that, an addiction, a crippling crutch. It is best as merely another tool, not the most important one.
Yes, you can hobble along with sheetmusic as your guide, but as long as you’re tied to it, even in performing it at home, your attention isn’t completely to the music, you’re tied to the sheet and the dots and that is a distraction that more than often robs the music of its potential for life, and your’s for a personal relationship and a deeper understanding of music. If you throw that crutch aside away you can dance, eventually, you’ll make the necessary full sensual connections and find the life in the music, making it personal, intimate… Sheetmusic is like making sex in a wetsuit and wearing an innertube for a condem. The results are tend to be uncomfortable. If you want a clearer understanding, record yourself playing from the dots, then play it back and use your ears. Then go and look up a recording of the same tune by someone not burdened with the dulling effect of seeing and following dots. As long as you’re tied to sheetmusic you won’t be able to really hear and feel music… But, it can be a ‘first contact’, if a very incomplete and generally misleading communication…

Isn’t it good that so many here would like you to experience the greater joy they have with it?

Make it yours, free it from the prison of paper and ink, go to its roots…

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Baylady, I am trying to encourage you to loose your paper crutch. If you think that is being graceless, it can only be because you have convinced yourself that you cannot walk without it. If you think I’m being unfair, if you think I’m trying to tip a paraplegic out of his only means of transport, you are mistaken.

I’m reminded of a terrific quote from Jimi Hendrix. He was asked in an interview, “Why do you play your guitar with your teeth?” His magnificent reply was, “I don’t, I play it with my ears.”

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Damn, cross post there C

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Nice posts, guys.

Baylady, no one is trying to put you down. We are just saying the beauty of the music is better found with your ears than your eyes. It will be to your benefit if you lose the crutch.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Llig, Jimi said it well, in fewer words than my ramble… 😉

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ha, yeah

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

This discussion - one of a remarkably repetitive series brought to you courtesy of
T H E I N T E R N E T
The greatest time-wasting invention ever!

Had it been olden times one of these interminable correspondences might have started with a letter to the Thunderer:
Sir - it has been brought to my attention that certain so-called musicians are persisting in learning melodies from scribblings on manuscript paper instead of using Edison cylinders, that modern invention that enables one to absorb all the nuances of a musical rendition, even if it is sometimes hard to make anything out through the hiss and crackle. Cast aside the crutch of the semi-quaver with the Edison Phonograph!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Sir - In agreement. ’Twill for certain be a waste of all our times so long as our dear miss baylady continues with her beloved paper crutch. However, in keeping with the spirit of the modern age, we shall instead live in hope.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

baylady ~ which musicians are you listening to playing airs?

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Education: The fine art of saying the same thing over and over again without going crazy.

improvise

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Baylady~~ when I was first new to this site, I too opened a can of worms with this topic… believe me, you’ve gotten off pretty lightly compared to the new F holes ripped open on my thread!

Anyway, I completly get what you are saying. I’ve played violin from the age of 9, and am 30 now. I recently, about 3 years ago, started playing fiddle, in particular, Irish tunes. I get the reliance on sheet music. Many here will just not understand because they’ve always been ear learners. However, if you have used the “dots” from a very young age and your brain created those visual pathways in the early brain development stages, it is very, very difficult to break.

Recently I have been trying my best to learn a few simple things by ear while putting together tunes for the band. It is extrememly difficult for me. I am definitely a visual learner! Even in dance class… once I’m shown my steps, I pick them up in a snap… if someone is just calling out the steps, I’m totally lost.

So, I can see both sides now. I’m still crippled with my sheetmusic. I think, to some extent, I always will be. It’s just ingrained in my very being. Of course, I’m in a band which likes to turn over new things fairly quickly and I just can’t learn by ear that fast!

However, when I’m tied to my stand and self-scribed tune book, I miss out on a lot. The other guys are running around raising all kinds of hell and I’m stuck there. When we get to one of the few simple tunes that I can play without looking, I get to look up and be a part of what’s going on.

I would say, hang in there. Use the dots if that’s what you need to do right now. If you are like me, playing by ear is perhaps more of a struggle than for most on this site. I play with guys that learned completely by ear and they are totally fine with the fact that I did not. They are patient and supportive. There are folks out there who are; surround yourself with those folks. I know how hard it is to keep chugging along when you feel like others are pulling you down or taking the joy out of playing by putting all this pressure on you.

I’ve also found that many of the great players, who are also nice and supportive, have about 20 + years of playing time over me. Don’t compare yourself to folks that have been doing this for years… and if they try to compare you to their status quo, they are being just as silly as you would comparing yourself to someone on a more advanced level.

Happy fiddling,
Fiddlechick

Re: hard to read some sheet music

You make it sound like you are a paraplegic and someone is trying to kick you out of your chair. What a sorry psychological state you’ve gotten yourself into.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Fiddlechick, I highly recommend listen, listen, & listen. There is no fault in taking time when learning anything new ~ take all the time you need. There is no fault on any musician being persistent about always listening.
I have been legally blind twice & while I am grateful for my vision (I have always more visual than aural) I never before found the aural world as rich as it sounded while my eyes were impaired. Ears work best when they are used.
Learning to play by ear, depending on the person, may or may not be the *quickest* way to learn. Does it matter?

Posted by .

Michael, did a paraplegic beat you up when you were young? ;)

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

The path of least resistance isn’t always the best one.

what is the cause of said resistance

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I see that there is a difference between learning a tune by ear or learning by the dots, and having to have the dots in front of you just to remember the silly thing

the crutch isn’t just in the learning, but also in the remembering

why it is important is because you will never be able to listen and react to the other players until you have the tune internalized

my experiance is that classical musicians seem to have the hardest time with this idea.

about a week ago I said something like, “I think playing the tunes is not as complicated as we tend to make it.” ;)
Hello, Silver Spear. Catch everyone later!

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Apparently being convinced that learning by ear is hard and certain people just aren’t wired to do it, so don’t.

1 last

cannot find it now, but way back when Will Harmon posted something about visual learning which is relevant. Eventually I will locate the link.
Cheers,
AB

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Can someone on the ‘dots’ side of the argument explain to me how they help? Because I don’t quite get it, and I’m wondering if I might be missing something useful.

I know dots can be useful, so I’ve learned to read them. But tunes are just sound. So, if you learn them from dots, which are visual rather than aural, aren’t you just putting an extra process in between hearing the tune and learning the tune?

As I say, I may be missing something, so it would be good to have a sensible answer to this. I’ve got a long way to go in this music, and I wouldn’t mind getting there while it’s still light.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

llig, fiddlechick is the one who was in an accident and has memory problems because of it, remember? That’s why she needs sheet music.

As for everyone else who kvetches about how they *can’t* learn by ear, that’s another matter.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Well llig, for example, I sat in with a piper the other day, after 5 hours of picking up tunes by ear my brain was frazzled, so I took names for the next couple hours, now I have a list of 20 or so tunes I am picking up from the dots[ and memory] I have no record of those tunes I picked up by ear , yes if someone starts them I can play along, but I cant start them because I need to remember the melody, which I get by daily repetition , and/or having a name to locate it in my memory.

How long does it take to figure out what notes are being played on a recording, 5 min? 10? 20? 1 hr ? 3 hrs? takes me a few seconds to read the dots.
I have a pile of tunes I am working my way through, start at one end till i get to the other then back. These are added to daily and ones I have taken out A far more effective method than trying to find recordings of these tunes, figure out what they play, jeez what I can accomplish in 20 min would take a week just by ear. . I know because I sent 20 yrs learning by ear before I learnt to read.

Some tunes are so memorable I can run through them half a dozen times and thats it, I have it. Yes I could pick them up by ear, but to remember them would be harder. Finding a setting, that I like, being played by an instrument that is played in a style that is commensurate to picking up the tune without idiosyncratic ornaments getting in the way. Just locating a recording of the tune might be impossible. or it hight take half an hour, takes me a few seconds to do a google/session search.
To think of going back to learning exclusively by ear! ye gods no. Its ok for people who sit in with the same crowd playing weekly, then its easy to pick up the tunes, they get played regularly. But for those of us who session in lots of places, or irregularly then its a far inferior way of picking up tunes.
My piper friend lives at the other end of the country, we meet twice a year, it would take a life time to pick up his tunes by ear. now when we meet I will have another 20 tunes in common.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I normally agree with SWFL Fiddler on most things, but above he made a statement that suggested that one of the reasons you should let go of sheet music is the fact that now we have the internet and MP3s. Ick!!!! I hope he was kidding. I find learning from MP3s far more dangerous than learning from sheet music. You can learn what those little marks on paper mean and know how to breath life into them, how to avoid playing them so literally that you sound like a robot. But learning from MP3s, you have no choice but to hear that robot sound, there is no way you can avoid it. I find the thought of learning from an MP3 far more ghastly than learning from sheet music…..
I myself wouldn’t use sheet music in public, but frequently refer to it at home when learning new tunes, a practice not at all unusual among the musicians I know.
Funny sheet music story. The other night our new choir director said, let me teach you as song, and then I will hand out the sheet music. Mass confused whispering broke out, but he pressed on, and taught us a call and response type hymn, very pretty. Then he handed out the music. And even though we had just learned the song without music, pretty much everyone immediately stuck their noses into the music. Now, THAT is using sheet music as a crutch!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ceolachan’s last long post had me thinking of a temperance campaigner on a stage, and that he needed to display some wretch who’s life had been changed when he escaped the evil of dots. Can’t decide between llig as the faith healer telling people to throw away their crutches, or an evangelist who might display someone who’s disgusting personal habits (at sessions) had changed when they recognized the True Way.

I’m not volunteering as a reformed wretch, and I can’t find the thread that convinced me I should really work on the learning by ear (it was probably much the same as all the others). But a couple of years ago I would have been with baylady saying that it was really hard to do and at my age maybe I shouldn’t bother trying. And that was without the disadvantage (for this) of being able to sight read

I am now getting along with it well enough that I am beginning to forget just how hard it was to start with. Long way to go yet though.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Al, you mean MIDI files (rather than MP3s), no?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Ed,
Are the MP3 files the ones that sound like recorded music? And the MIDI files the ones that sound like robots? Oh dear, I have once again demonstrated my ignorance, this time of all things electronic. There is a reason I play acoustic instruments, I am woefully uneducated in how music is recorded these days. Although I do like these new silver music disks, because unlike the old black ones, I can play them in my car!
SWFL, I humbly beg your forgiveness!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

The thing is, learning by ear is a process, not a destination. Its a rare person who can pick up an entire concerto by ear in one sitting![ { I know we are not talking about concertos!] You need to start slow and simple with masses of repetition. Over time you can go for more complex tunes at faster speeds. Eventually you can sit in sessions and pick up many if not most tunes 2nd and 3rd time round, perhaps missing a few tricky riffs that you will need to get next time[ or grab a look at some dots]
By trying to leap in at the deep end because there are folk swimming around telling you how easy it is you can simply find yourself way out of your depth and disheartened.
IMO being able to play by ear is pretty much essential in this genre, and many others,but , the big but, dont expect to be able to pick up fast reels played with full ornamentation in a few sitting.
The ear and brain need training to develop an understanding of the music and so find your way in naturally. take a slow air, a polka, stick it on loop and keep at it, over the course of some time, depending on your own physiology and capabilities you will get it, it might take an hour , a week, a month or just 10 min, but its very much worth having a go.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

“Masses of repetition.” Quite right. It’s music, it’s an artform, it’s always changing and evolving. If you look at any artform, it takes years of practice and repetition to get where you want to be, and yet you’ll never be where you want to be, you’ll always be wanting to improve, learn a new style, finally nail that tune you’ve always wanted to play but it’s been too hard, etc. It’s not unlike dancing, painting, writing, or any other artform in that regard. It’s partially a sign of the times that people think they can follow a tutorial and be a master sessioner in 6 months. If you want to hold your own at a session or in any other artform, stop being lazy and immerse yourself and practice and repeat, repeat, and repeat again. If you find that’s boring, then don’t be a musician and go turn on the t.v., XBox, or whatever and disconnect from life.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Fiddlechick7 ~ beatifully and sensitively put, with empath…

However, part of the essential character, spirit and joy/craic of this music is what passes between musicians sharing it. The worst brick wall between that communication is to have a music stand and sheetmusic in front of you drawing your attention away from what’s important ~ the ‘music’ and the other musicians present. With the sheetmusic you’re at best half deaf, half blind, half ~ you might as well tear a sheet in half, chew up the two halves and stuff them in your ears, while keeping your eyes closed…

It is, in my mind, better to know a few tunes intimately than only know thousands when the page is open to one of them. That said, I can see how someone with memory problem might need to find their confidence tied to the dots, but those folks are in a very small minority. In many tests, including with Alzheimers and dementia, aural memory is repeatedly proven to be very strong… I have short term memory problems, but seemingly not aurally… Sometimes, as addiction is, we convince ourselves we need something, we become dependant…

“I find learning from MP3s (who meant ‘midis’) far more dangerous than learning from sheet music. ~” Al Brown

Yes! ~ not confusing MP3s with midi…

“Ceolachan’s last long post had me thinking of a temperance campaigner on a stage, and that he needed to display some wretch who’s life had been changed when he escaped the evil of dots. ~” david_h

Yeah, me too! 😉 ~ I also teach people to read and use sheetmusic…

“I am now getting along with it well enough that I am beginning to forget just how hard it was to start with. Long way to go yet though.” david_h ~ & Fiddlechick7 said something similar ~ it’s damned hard if you’ve become ‘dependant’ on giving your full focus to the dots, crouching behind the sheet…

Ionannas ~ nice one, start small, start slow…

“ ~ when he escaped the evil of dots.“ david_h

In which case they’d no longer be wretched… 😀

Re: hard to read some sheet music

HA!

Mr. Brown, no worries mi amigo!

Yes, I was thinking of those poor folks in the middle of nowhere with no other musicians to play with and so on. No excuse for not trying to learn by ear! If you can find the mustard board you can download music to listen to! 😉

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Fiddlechick7 and baylady have no problems expressing themselves off the cuff aurally in English. I have therefore no doubt that they have no disability that should preclude them from being able to express themselves off the cuff aurally with music. I’m certain of it.

However, I could be wrong. If indeed they have some spurious and real disability with regards to playing music, and that, as they say, their strength is in the visual, perhaps they should pursue the visual arts instead of the aural arts.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

A pertinent article: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-sheet/daniel-willingham/the-big-idea-behind-learning.html

quote: “The prediction is straightforward: Kids learn better when they are taught in a way that matches their learning style than when they are taught in a way that doesn’t.

That’s a straightforward prediction.

The data are straightforward too: It doesn’t work.“

Hell if I can find it now, but some time ago I read an article that made a pretty compelling case for teaching a subject in a style that matched the subject, rather than the learner’s proclivities. I was remembering this article some years back, when I had the opportunity to teach a pottery lesson to a blind woman. My own technique improved in leaps and bounds after that, and it was only then - several years after I began throwing pots - that I realized that it didn’t matter that I am a profoundly visual thinker; pottery is primarily a tactile art, not a visual one. I don’t turn the lights off or even remove my glasses when I’m throwing, but sometimes I’ll briefly close my eyes and my hands will pick up a detail that my eyes missed. And when I’m playing fiddle and not getting the sound I want, I know that the remedy doesn’t lie in *looking* more closely.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Thanks, Tall, Dark, and Mysterious
Well, I have not located a related comment by Will Harmon.
All the same I like this,
Re: “Learning by ear”
“benhall’s point shouldn’t be lost in the other helpful clutter here. Learning a tune from another person, face to face, really is a great way to go.
It becomes an interpersonal or social experience, and the tune will then always carry the fullness of that experience. Which is a big part of what
playing the music is all about–connecting with other people. That’s by far how I prefer to learn tunes.”
November 8th 2006 by Miss Lonelyhearts

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Well, Llig, I’m a poet, writer, and English Teacher, so I’d hope I can express myself with words adequately well. Also, my words are written down, off the cuff, but they are there if I need to go back and read what I’ve read. I do the same thing with music. I learn tunes a lot by ear, but write out my own notations as I learn them so that I don’t forget them a week later, which is what generally happens. I know you like to argue, I see that from going back and reading posts; what you don’t get is that nobody is playing for you. Aside from the amusement factor some of us may find in your posts, it is that same crotchity humor that makes many of the newbees here not take what you say very seriously either.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

And that is the best way to deal with llig, fiddlechick7, just stand your ground and state your case! His bark is worse than his bite. I even remember a situation where he was acting very kindly and encouraging….or maybe that was someone else I am thinking of…..in any event, it has been a few years since it happened……oh, never mind…… 😉

Re: hard to read some sheet music

confession Fiddlechick7, I write tunes down I have worked out/been shown etc. so I can revisit them. Funnily enough, that’s how a whole lot of music got passed down.

I’m on a search for a good hard back book with pre printed staves. There are plenty of paperback blank manuscript books around but the only decent hardbacks ones I can find have pre-printed treble and bass clefs. I want to add my own as required. I contacted the publishers and they say they don’t print blank manuscript in hardback because there is no demand!

Re: hard to read some sheet music

A “poet, writer and English Teacher” (sic) … but can’t spell “crotchety”.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

‘it is that same crotchity humor that makes many of the newbees here not take what you say very seriously either’

Or ‘newbies’ too.

How on earth does she know that many newbies don’t take llig seriously? Has she conducted a poll?

llig remains one of the best sources of advice on this site.

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Yes Floss, Llig may be abrasive at times but sometimes that’s what it takes to cut through the damaging drivel force fed to beginners here where the only requirement is to be able to type .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

How on earth would you know floss? You didnt even know bunker hill was a reel even while listening and reviewing it…. He thinks he plays the salamanca right and Bobby Casey plays it wrong! and you think he is one of the best sources of advice?! Do you even play trad? You couldn’t possibly make such a ridiculous and colossal blunder in calling a reel a jig and mixing the names of the tunes up if you actually played them.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Childish of me, but I also giggled at a musician having trouble with the word “crotchet”.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Jig, it strikes me that you’re a simple soul, but, equally, an extremely devious one, especially in your complete misunderstanding of Llig’s point about ‘The Salamanca’’.

My mistake in that review was just a slip of the pen (or the keyboard equivalent), but you, of course, have never made a single mistake in your life.

Fortunately, I have never played ‘trad’ in my life, but I have been playing Irish music for a considerable time longer than you and, on the evidence of your playing of ‘The Rights of Man’ (http://www.filefreak.com/files/64097_hcmba/rights%20of%20man.%20scratchy.mp3%5Drights), rather more proficiently than you too.

Get back to your sticks!

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

ethical blend, Don’t forget that there are lands where you can play music all your life without ever encountering the word ‘crotchet.’

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I remember a couple years ago I was taking a whistle class and every week the teacher would talk about things being crotchets and quavers and such and such bar had so many crotchets and quavers. It took me ages to figure out what the hell he was on about.

I still can’t remember which one is which.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Neither can I and I think I did it at school. Eighths notes etc makes more sense to me. Still hard to spell though.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

That’s a bit weird. I posted something, it appeared, and now it’s disappeared. Oh well - shortened version: There’s got to be a certain amount of irony in describing a person who advocates not using sheet music as “crotchety” when that word comes directly from the same word as something in musical notation. And it does come from that same word (“crotchet”), even if the word itself may not be used around the world any more. There’s a double irony, in my view, when it’s misspelt, so as to remove that connection. A bit like hearing a tune wrong, or something.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Oh so I misunderstood lligs point?! you mean all the comments in this thread?
https://thesession.org/discussions/22880
Why then please do explain… Im sure an astute individual like yourself will be able to explain it to a simple fellow like me.

This one for example;
“You hear this all time and it’s very frustrating. For example, people playing the Salamanca “fg afdg bgeg” instead of how is should go, “fg afde gbeg” “

What does that mean then? It seems pretty clear to me, but you seem to think I have misunderstood, so do explain. I wont hold my breath.

Another one that baffles me, Pretty much everyone here in Ireland calls it trad, apart from those that dislike it and call it diddly. Apart from you… If you dont know the common term for the music, yet you play it… Im sorry but it just doesnt make sense. Either you dont get out much/ at all, or you dont communicate with other trad players , or you dont actually play it.
As far as slip of the pen? Pull the other one. You mean you spelled Reel as jig? and spell check didn’t catch it. Then you proof read it, and still didn’t catch it, then you published it, and I caught it. !!! ?Hmmm
Yes we all make mistakes Floss, thats normal, but when you are reviewing a Classic recording, From Paddy Caney, PJ Hayes and co doesn’t it behoove you to actually pay attention to what you are writing? Especially as you make comments like ’ blooming terrible’! When it clearly isnt.!

http://www.irishmusicreview.com/canny.htm

That recording was late at night, take 1, on a new Viola , after the pub as it happens and its not Irish, its a Scottish tune. But anyhow, as you’ve been playing that much longer do demonstrate your solo playing…. or was that an idle boast?

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Blimey, what a horrible and nasty sarcastic tone. I’d watch out if I was you. You always get like just before you get barred.

Posted .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

Well, I certainly don’t take people seriously who would rather find typos than to give solid advice. It’s hard to type left-handed because my writing hand is currently in a sling, and I certainly don’t care about spell-checking after finishing reading 92 essays and commenting on grammatical errors… my bad, I guess.. I’m doing the “poke” method right now. Seriously guys, don’t you have anything better to do… are you that up- tight?

It’s all friendly banter.

Posted by .

Re: hard to read some sheet music

in America they are called 1/8th notes and 1/4 notes, but I suppose you know that already, on an International site its probably clearer terminology.

Re: hard to read some sheet music

I did know that the Americans generally opt for 1/8 notes, 1/4 notes, etc. I have grown used to using the terminology myself from time to time but I don’t see what is so difficult about learning the proper terminology. I certainly don’t want to start talking about dotted 1/4 notes. Or are you meant to call them 3/8 notes?!