Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

I personally found Sonny Murray’s funeral mass in a packed Ennis Cathedral yesterday morning to be highly significant and relevant to all involved with traditional music. Just to set the scene the mass was concelebrated by a number of priests but with Fr. Joe McMahon appropriately assuming the leading role. I say appropriately in that Fr Joe is also actively involved in traditional music and participated in many of the activities down through the years along with Sonny.

Fr Joe commenced the ceremony with a brief bio starting in those early years in Kilmihil (West Clare) where Sonny regularly played his concertina for House Dances which often didn’t finish until the early hours of the morning. In fact it was coming home from one such event that Sonny first met his beloved Frances and gave her a lift home on the bar of his bike. The couple got married and emigrated to Cricklewood, a district in London much favoured by Irish emigrants at the time. Irish traditional music was going through a halycon period in the 1950s with so many great musicians and Sonny became totally immersed in this rich cultural scene. However, the draw of home became too much for him and he returned to the Banner county some few short years later to settle in Ennis with Frances and daughter, Helen.

Sonny got a job as a carpenter with Clare County Council and it wasn’t long until he became deeply involved with traditional music in the County with the likes of legends such as Joe Cooley and Seán Reid. Along with these musicians he also became involved with the setting up of Comhaltas in Clare and as they say “the rest is now history”.

Getting back to the mass, not only did the Cathedral congregation contain a veritable “who’s who” of musicians from the county but most of the Kilfenora Céilí Band along with Kieran Hanrahan and Paul Roche of Stockton’s Wing had brought along their instruments. Appropriately the first piece they played was Sonny Murray’s Hornpipe which he himself always played along with Home Ruler and Kitty’s Wedding. During one of the quieter parts of the mass, the strains of the beautiful slow air, Mná na hÉireann on whistle echoed through the Cathedral which again was very appropriate as Sonny was also a highly talented player on this instrument. The funeral mass concluded with all musicians present in an unforgettable rendition of the Maid Behind the Bar followed by Ed Reavey’s the Hunter’s House, another two tunes from Sonny’s repertoire.

A moving tribute to Sonny on behalf of Comhaltas was then delivered by the Chairman of Cois na hAbhna, Frank Whelan. Frank, a long time friend of Sonny’s, spoke of some of his unique characteristics where he was just as happy playing for a small group of overseas visitors in Ennis as he would be playing on Tour Concerts or prestigious venues such as the Glór Irish Music Centre. In addition to his enormous musical contribution such as anchor man at Fleadh Nua sessions, etc Sonny never had a problem with rolling up his sleeves when circumstances required this. Not only could be found building outdoor stages for fleadhanna but he was the man who built the wooden floor in the Cois na hAbhna cultural centre something set dancers have enjoyed down through the years to present times. Finally Frank spoke of Sonny’s “open house” approach for musicians throughout his lifetime and in particular his support and encouragement for the younger musicians. Paul Roche who later went on to marry his daughter Helen and Kieran Hanrahan were two typical examples of musicians who benefited from Sonny’s mentoring.

Why was Sonny special? Here was a man born and brought up in rural Ireland who was totally un-self conscious of his talents and abilities from an early age but just immersed himself in the music. He might have problems competing with some of today’s young exponents who have technique coming out of their ears but he was an infinitely better musician. Sonny was a modest but very happy man who would be totally unaware and intolerant of “musical pecking order” but rather revelled in the joys and beauty of the music.

An inspiration – unfortunately we won’t see the likes of Sonny again but we can all take example from him by, ourselves, making the best of our talents, showing the utmost respect for the music and also for all other musicians.

Go raibh míle maith agat Sonny!

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Thank you Bannerman for a very eloquent remembrance of Sonny Murray and it is good to know that it took the Cathedral to accommodate all his friends in Clare to give him a great sendoff.

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Brilliant, a lovely addition and reflection. Thanks for taking the time, thought and heart to write this and add it here, much appreciated ~ ‘c’

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Thanks "c" - notwithstanding my normal aversion to producing long posts, I just had to get typing as it was the most moving funeral I’ve ever been to where all contributors knew Sonny intimately and spoke from the heart not to mention the musicians who also played from the heart. Your suggestion of a compilation of his music is an excellent one. However, when I spoke with Frank Whelan some weeks ago he said that he was working along with Joe O’Connor in the Cois na hAbhna Archive on an album of Clare concertina players which should be released in Spring 2010. Hopefully this recording will contain some of Sonny’s music.

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Thanks, I did do a search previously, but didn’t manage to find anything of Sonny’s playing, thinking that would be a nice addition here… Our paths only crossed a few times, so I didn’t know Sonny well, but there was an immediate appreciation of the person and his music…

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Now I know why, it has only just been added. Brilliant, thank, and I look forward to the release of a new compilation of Clare concertina music, the tracks and the notes…

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Thanks very much for posting this, Bannerman - very much appreciated. A lovely tribute to a great musician.

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Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

He was also mad into greyhounds as a younger man. He could be seen walking them every morning around the grounds of St Flannan’s college. Thanks bannerman.

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Omission from original piece - I met someone in Ennis today who said that one of the nicest pieces of music at the funeral was the concertina duet at the very start. As I was seven or eight minutes late for the funeral I missed this completely. The two musicians were Edel Fox and Timmy Collins so go raibh míle maith agaibh to both of you and please accept my apologies for the omission.

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Thanks Bannerman. Your tribute was timely and inspirational. It brought tears to my eyes that such virtues were not unappreciated
and your representation of your culture, to which many aspire, was brilliantly done. Thank you, from West Virginia, USA

Re: Sonny Murray – An Inspiration!

Thanks bannerman, it was an honour to play at Sonny’s mass and a wonderful celebration of a great great man.

Edel Fox