a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Hey. I found this lovely bit on You Tube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8haKD5PwWY


i know a little Irish, but not enough. Any one care to help me out with a translation of the story Seamus is telling here? Even a general explanation of the gist of it would be most welcome! there’s a nice old version of the tune at the end , too.
Thanks for your attention
cheers.
pipewatcher

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

http://www.brendantaaffe.com/irelandjournals/index.html :

Seamus Ennis, a mighty piper and music collector, would tell the story of a piper who, on his rambles home one night, came across a fairy rath. Entranced by the music, he spent the night hiding behind one of the stones that ringed the outside of the rath, peering around to see the little people dance and play. At sunrise, when they returned into the rath to sleep, the piper went to investigate and found a tiny gold ring, left on the ground. The music he had heard danced through his head all that day, but elusively, for when he tried to play the tunes he had heard they slipped away.

The next night, he returned to the rath to listen to the music and heard a fairy piper lamenting the loss of his ring, declaring that he would do anything to get it back. The human piper stepped forward and offered the ring, explaining that he had been hiding the night before and had found it on the ground. He was granted a wish, and the piper said he wanted one of the tunes he had heard the night before, a particular jig that kept slipping away from him. The wish was granted and the tune in question is known as The Gold Ring, popular in sessions still.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

go h-íontach! go raibh maith agat , a Fhéargal!

Just what I thought

Wish I knew how to have the entire link highlighted.

Posted by .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

the link worked fine. and a fine link it was. Thanks Random!

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Basically, a man was walking in the woods and he heard this music, so he followed it down to a lake where a group of fairies were dancing. When they left he found a gold ring in the place they were dancing, and he took it with him. He then heard the fairies had a place in the woods, and he went there to return the ring. The fairy was so pleased that he told the man he could have one wish. The man didn’t know what to ask for because he wasn’t expecting it , but then asked for the best tune that the fairies had. The fairy went inside, returned with his pipes and played him the tune, and Seamus states that the name on the tune ever since then has been the gold ring.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

An English language version can be found on his Leader lp

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

very nice . Thanks to all for the input. Any native or fluent Irish speakers who care to comment on the particulars of Seamus’ pronunciation and usage? I don’t know if Seamus was a native Irish speaker himself

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Pipewatcher, there was a broadcast on Rté about Seamus Ennis’ Bicycle Diaries, which might be interesting for you. I haven’t yet watched it, but I will.
Ó Bhéal Go Béal: Séamus Ennis 1/3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HePlm_CCSUE

Posted by .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

I believe Séamus’ Irish was influenced by the general dialect of Connemara, a place where he spent time collecting songs.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

http://www.ramblinghouse.org/2009/07/seamus-ennis/
"Seamus’s early schooling was at the Holy Faith Convent in Glasnevin and at Belvedere College. Then he attended all-Irish schools at Scoil Cholm Cille and Colaiste Mhuire and this, coupled with family visits to Rosmuc in the Connemara Gaeltacht as a teenager and his father being a keen lover of all things Irish, gave Seamus a grounding in Irish which he developed to the full.
His Irish language proficiency proved a major asset later on. While collecting folk songs and tunes for Radio Eireann and the BBC, he had an uncanny ability to converse in the regional Gaelic dialects with people in Connemara, Donegal, Kerry and even Scotland."

Posted by .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

I just watched the video "Ó Bhéal go Béal", and its obvious from the clip starting at 4:50 that he speaks Connemara Irish.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Not necessarily. One of the things people tell of Ennis during his collecting days is that he was fluent in all dialects of Irish. When in Connemara he’d speak like a local (maybe from the next parish) and ditto in Donegal or Kerry etc. For that reason he was so successful as a collector.

He did spend his summers in Connemara as a child to improve his Irish.

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

@Random_Humour- i’ve watched that film. it’s a good one, alright! thanks for the rambling house link, too.
@Prof. & liammcg-in the ‘gold ring’ story, would you say he was speaking in a Connemara dialect?

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Yes,in general its the connemara dialect.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Greetings!

For those not conversant with the Gaelic title "O bheal go beal" it means "From mouth to mouth"

Sorry, I can’t get any fadas on this computer

All the best

Brian xx

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

To put it a short way, hold the Ctrl and Alt keys whilst typing the letter and that’ll do it for you, Brian. Like this: bodhrán. You have to hold all three keys down at the same time, so press the Ctrl and hold it, then the Alt and hold it and then whilst still holding the first two keys, the vowel you want a fada on.

Posted by .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Seamus is using something that Joe Heaney would have spoken. Ros Muc / Carna area. I’ve heard him do the whole Kerry thing as well.

Re: An Bhfuil Gaeilge Agat?

..just to correct the spelling.

Re: An Bhfuil Gaeilge Agat? Tá!

"…he was fluent in all dialects of Irish"

Um, No!
Séamus Ennis spoke in the Connemara dialect only, though in common with many Irish speakers he could understand the other dialects. No native speaker I have ever heard does impressions of other dialects when speaking to speakers of those dialects, although they do amend their speech so as to maximize the likelihood of being understood. Does anyone have a recording of Séamus Ennis speaking in the Donegal or Kerry dialect? I very much doubt it. And, while he was certainly a very competent speaker, he did not speak as a native.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Thank you nedscot.You are correct.

Re: an Bhfuil Gaeilge Agat

standing corrected

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Nedscot, praise for Ennis as a linguist is universal. Each and every source discussing his achievements as a collector of song and music have the same thing t o say about his ability to speak to the people he was collecting from in their own dialect. That may not fit in with the native speakers you know, it surely is the opinion of all people who knew Ennis.

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

While all the Irish experts are gathered, would anyone care to give me a rough phonetic transcription of "an buachaill dreoite"?

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

On booakhill drowite?

Re: an Bhfuil Gaeilge Agat?

A lot of what is written about the great characters of 20th century Irish traditional music is really hagiography, and not necessarily accurate. And much of the hagiography (much of it coming from America) is written by those without the necessary linguistic knowledge to make accurate scholarly pronouncements. It is simply not necessary to switch between dialects in Irish to be understood, they are not all that distinct. It’s not as if they’re different languages. (The dialects in Gaelic in Ireland are fairly distinct though (e.g., Kerry Irish is inflected Donegal Irish isn’t except in the first person.))

The only people I know who switch between distinct dialects (artificially, obviously) are language teachers. A Glaswegian does not adopt a Yorkshire accent in order to speak to a Yorkshire-man; and you don’t get this phenomenon in Ireland either.

The issue is simply resolved though: present us with a recording of Séamus Ennis speaking Donegal Irish!

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

It just wouldnt happen that Ennis would talk to a Donegal man in Donegal Irish.It would be cringeworthy.I too would like to hear a recording of this. Just imagine the concept in English and you might understand how daft it would sound.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Well, we’ll assume Breandán Breathnach, Seán ‘ac Donncha and Ríonach uí Ógáin, among others were all making it up then

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Well I hope so or I would have to live with the terrible thought of Seamus Ennis conversing with Donegal people with a put on Donegal accent!His Irish was Connemara Irish as used very well by a Dubliner with no silly attempts to make himself sound like a Connemara man.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

Glad you approve of Seamus Ennis’ ability expressing himself in Irish.

I hope you also realise how that makes you sound.

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

So Breathnach,’ac Donnacha and bean uí Ógáin can have an opinion on Ennis but the rest of us have restrictions imposed!

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

They could all boast of a long standing first hand close knowledge of Ennis and his work. Which would count for something in my book.


Another observation about Ennis and accents came from Rush, Co Dublin born piper Chris Langan. I was talking with Chris about Ennis and at some point Chris said ‘you know Seamus is from North county Dublin yet he has an overall Irish accent but he never sounds like he’s from North county Dublin’.

Interesting isn’t it?

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

If you read carefully Professor you will find that is more or less what nedscott and myself said. An overall Irish accent using Connemara Irish.

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

It was referring to his accent when speaking English. Not to the North Co. Dublin Gaeltacht.

Posted .

Re: a’ bhuil Gaeilge agat?

As nedscot has said, the various dialects of Irish have different pronunciation, grammer etc. BUT they are not different languages and a person speaking Corca Dhuibhne Irish would be able to converse with someone from Donegal, after all, the proof of this is to be heard on Radio na Gaeltachta everyday.

I am sure Séamus Ennis would have been able to alter parts of his speech in order to communicate more freely with people.( e.g Verbs formations) However, I don’t believe he would switch from pure connemara Irish to pure Kerry, Donegal Irish on the spot.