a good beginning flute?

a good beginning flute?

Hey Everyone,

I played classical flute for years, up until high school when i discovered the guitar. I still have my flute, and have been thinking of selling it and getting some sort of beginner irish keyless flute.

Most of the flutes i have seen have six holes, and some have two extra holes as a sort of pinkie extension. Are all these flutes usually pitched in D, and then you can play in a limited number of other keys by cross fingering? Or do people buy diffrerent key flutes, such as is done with penny whistles?

If some of you could suggest a good beginner flute that would be great.


thanks



anton

Posted by .

Re: a good beginning flute?

*wail*

Posted by .

Re: a good beginning flute?

sorry bout that, don’t know what came over me.

have a look in the links section of the site: click on ‘links’ on the right hand navbar, then click the ‘search’ tab, and follow through to ‘musical instruments’.

A casual browse through them urls should give you a good cartographical grounding to what’s out there, and you should enjoy exploring the many options and choosing something to suit you - from the polymer flutemakers (Tony Dixon, Michael Cronolly’s M&E, Desi Seery etc) to the bamboo and other wood flute makers Olwell, McGee, Hamilton and more. There are also ergonomic and small-handed options from the likes of Casey Burns. The world is your mollusc, you lucky lucky…fluter you.

Posted by .

Re: a good beginning flute?

Casey Burns is offering a new beginner flute in mopane for $250 USD.

http://www.caseyburnsflutes.com/ff.php

I have had one of his mopane flutes in D for two years and have come to love it! Casey is easy to talk with and he really cares that you get what want in his flutes.

Read this link and following posting on the Chiff and Fipple message board for postings on Casey’s new flute.

http://chiffboard.mati.ca/viewtopic.php?t=16317

Casey’s webpage says that he has them (the beginner flute in stock now.)

MarkB

Posted by .

Re: a good beginning flute?

Hi,

I’ve been playing flute seriously for a bit over a year now (not seriously for a few years before that). I’ve owned a Dixon polymer, which I highly recommend, and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend a casey burns flute, either. His beginner flute is a serious bargain. I’d not put a Seery as a true beginners flute - it takes more wind and a better embouchure to get it to sound great, but being a past Boehm flute player it may not be too difficult a transition for you. Right now I own a Seery (I like polymer with a 5 year old boy running around my house and two 50+ pound dogs - it doesn’t break when dropped or knocked down).

You don’t need different keys of flutes. The basic 6 hole model, with cross fingers and half holing, can play all incidentals except for D#. Depending on your flute and your skill at these techniques, you can play most music, and on more expensive flutes (inluding the Seery and M&E) you could get a D# key for that most annoying note. However, for nearly all ITM, you don’t need keys at all which is why some of the older players took their old flutes and closed up the keys or removed them.

I hope that helps.

Eric