Slow airs

Slow airs

Can anyone point me in the direction of any nice slow airs, please?

Either in dots (O.K. yes I know that is ESPECIALLY sacreligious for airs) or far better to sound/video clips from which I can learn. Either Scottish or Irish would be good.

Many thanks
Ian

Re: Slow airs

Inis Oirr

Re: Slow airs

and one of my favourites which sounds great on fiddle as well as pipes:

X: 1
T: Doinna
M: 3/4
R: Air
K: Ador
A2|:e4de | g4e2 | d4cA | B4A2 | A4G2 |=f6 | e6-|e4A2|
|e4de | g4e2 | d4cA | B4E2 | A4Bc | B4A2 |[1 A6-|A4A2:|[2 B/c/d2c/B/A2-|A4E2|
|:A4B2 | c4e2 | B4AG | g6 | g4a2 |e6 | e4de | ^c4d2 | e4d^c | d6 | A4A2|
d4e2|=f4a2 | e4dB | c4A2 | B4A2 | G4Bc | B6 |[1 A6-|A4E2:|[2 A6-|A4

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Re: Slow airs

Try this one I am trying to learn it at the moment ..

Bean Dubh a’ Ghleanna, - ( The dark woman of the glen ) I think it means ?

I’ll as the wee lad Daire Taylor here for the dot’s, if he has them and you also want to learn it —

A wee lad playing it in my house one evening -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuOkknHmX4s


And the old Irish tradition when you held the Singer’s Hand
just for to comfort him at the time -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuOkknHmX4s


jim,,,

Re: Slow airs

Gam,

That Air in you last post above is surely a beauty -

Thanks - jim,,,

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I think airs are very personal things, more so than dance tunes. Maybe because they demand more emotional involvement and a bit of life experience.
There’s a great one on the late Joe Ryan’s recording, An Buachaill Dreoite with a rather unpronounceable name, Ged A Theid Mi Do M’Leabaidh. I thinks that’s Scots Gaelic but according to notes, the song the air comes from is along the lines of ‘Though I am in bed, sleep will not come’. Perhaps a common theme for many Irish people these days?

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Re: Slow airs

Many thanks to all for the sugestions - plenty of happy hours coming up investigating, I can see.

>>Bean Dubh a’ Ghleanna

a particular beauty, IMHO

Ian

Re: Slow airs

>>sugestions

oops…

Re: Slow airs

Get a copy of Eugene O’Donnell’s Slow Airs and Set Dances CD (Green Linnet GLCD1015)

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Re: Slow airs

A fiddle player of my acquaintance once asked the same question of a Comhaltas person at fleadh, ‘Do you speak gaelic?’ was the comeback, my fiddle playing acquaintance didn’t speak gaelic, ‘Then you can’t play airs’ - end of discussion. Do we agree or not?

Re: Slow airs

"’Then you can’t play airs…"

Obviously. Playing a slow air while not being a Gaelic/Irish speaker is a three-point offense on your traditional music license. Sort of like talking on a mobile phone while driving.

Re: Slow airs

That Comhaltas person sounds like a bit of a donkey but there is some currency in listening to gaelic song to understand the melodies involved in the traditional airs etc (or much loved gaelic waltzes or any other tune type thats presented by the voice for that matter, the whole gambit is quite commonly heard in scots gaelic singing and well worth a listen to understand how these tunes work: airs 2/4 marches strathspeys reels jigs 6/8 marches etc…..).

To get a handle on this I’d say you only need to listen not talk or even understand whats being sung, as sound is an international language. The variation in articulation between the parts (as we’d call them tunes rather than songs) can be got from listening to the different treatments of the verses.

Re: Slow airs

Speaking of Comhaltas and fleadhanna - I think it’s ridiculous having a slow air category as these fleadhs are mainly populated by the young. Given that many of the songs and airs have a sad theme to them, these kids (hopefully) have no business playing them - it’s not the job of a child to be playing laments.

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Re: Slow airs

packbacker, the argument by that Comhaltas person could be turned round, so that it could be argued that a non-English speaker shouldn’t play music by Vaughan Williams or Holst based on English folk song. The Comhaltas person’s "argument" is effectively denying a particular kind of instrumental music to a large proportion of the world’s population who would, for whatever reason, not be able to learn Gaelic.
Some years ago I attended a slow airs workshop by Brendan McGlinchey (senior fiddle tutor at the Comhaltas summer school in Listowel, 2001). He was talking about the advisability of researching the cultural, historical and political background of the tune, but he certainly didn’t tell everyone to learn Gaelic as a prime prerequisite for playing an air on the fiddle or flute. A translation of the words of the original could, I suggest, be seen as part of the air’s cultural background.
Learning Gaelic would of course be essential for anyone who wished to _sing_ in Gaelic, as it would be for singing in any other language.

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TheSilverSpear -

< not being a Gaelic/Irish speaker is a three-point offense on your traditional music license.>

I don’t Speak Irish — But still TRY to play Irish Slow Air’s,,
So I think your doing anything wrong at all,,,

” Go for It Man ” — jim,,,

Re: Slow airs

Opps — Not Doing - anything wrong…
jim,,,

Re: Slow airs

Jim, I was being a bit sarcastic.

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what instrument do you play Ian?

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>>what instrument do you play Ian?

Seamyderry, I play mostly the mandolin, with some octave mandola and bouzouki. Not perhaps the most sympathetic instruments for airs, I think, but I have been working on playing the mandolin using arpeggios/picked melody fill-ins and multiple stopping, which gives it a sound not totally unlike a wire-strung harp. Well in my derganged imagination,anyway…

Ian

Re: Slow airs

dont know about that, i think slow airs work great on a mandolin. not too sure about mandola or bouzouki but i might be wrong.
Theres a nice air by Altan called the Waves of Gola, you should listen out for that. Ive played it on the mandolin before and if i say so myself it sounded well.

Re: Slow airs

If it is the mandolin you play then anything by O’caraolan works nicely.

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