Share my pain

Share my pain

Sorry for posting yet another of these, but this one actually made me laugh out loud. It’s actually an instructional video…lawd help us, so it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBmqrn_mysg


I live near Nimbin, ‘spiritual’ capital of Aus, so I have to put up with this sort of thing a *lot*. And we all know misery loves company.

Re: Share my pain

god damn them all to heck

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He should go out to some remote tribe somewhere and show them how to make poisoned arrows properly.

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sounds like someone putting up a corrugated roof… it was very painful, so considered it shared..

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I share you pain Bro…I do …I do
Why do I think of the hymn..O God our help in ages past etc etc.
Have Mercy on us Lord for indeed our hell is on this earth.

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It chops up the phrases of The Glasgow Reel to make them sound like little barking and snarling goblins.

Its assistance to this particular tune is thus bestowed with sensitivity, bringing out its essential nature.

I feel glad, all the same, that I don’t live near Nimbin.

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Is he doing the bloody Amen Break to a bloody reel?

Ferfuxache.

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Thank you. That was truly inspirational. Was it just me or did anybody else feel he was holding back a little?…For a brief moment I could almost hear the strains of some melodic nonsense in the background. Very much looking forward to his new album with Martin Hayes.

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It needed more rainstick.

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He said he was going to switch it up on the B part. He didn’t…

But seriously, he has to know that those aren’t welcome at sessions haha.

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coming to a session near you…I can hear the drums in the distance.
Where is that guy’s accent from, it sounds like a real hotch potch…he sounds like he’s moved around quite a bit for long stretches at a time…I can understand that.

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hey, bc box, how’s things up in the "spritual capital"… send me a smoke signal yeah !

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There were a lot of nuances to this man’s playing. The varying angle of his palms, the subtly differing velocity of the strikes, the fingertip upcurls and downcurls throughout the passionate performance.

Hearing him, some phrases popped into my head. I hastily scribbled them down, and I share them now: “syncopated spellbinder,” “how many long years of diligent practice, soul-stirrer?” “invite thy muse to guide thy fingers, O noble skin-stroker,” "Dad…? Dad…?" and “scale the Apollonian heights, that others may follow.”

Also, “more cowbell.”

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"Where is that guy’s accent from, it sounds like a real hotch potch…he sounds like he’s moved around quite a bit for long stretches at a time…I can understand that.
"

He sounds like he’s from Ulster - but he is Irish. His name is Tom Muckian and he stays in Dallas:

http://www.myspace.com/paddygonewild

"Paddy Gone Wild plays traditional Celtic Music in a non-traditional way."

So - no pretensions.

"Tom Muckian (whistle, djembe). In his youth in Ireland Tom studied piano and piano accordion. Don’t worry, though, he hasn’t touched an accordion in years"

He has got some taste, apparently.

Give the guy a break.

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All I don’t get is how it can feel musically rewarding to repeat practically the exact same 1-second sequence for an entire set.

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it would be a subjective experience I think

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Weejie - I’m sure your man Tom is a wonderful, kind hearted, man. However, in the rankings of session killers, here is where I think the Djembe sits -

1) Random Epic Natural Disaster
2) Overflowing Loo into seating area
3) Djembe
4) Alcohol shortage
5) Constant and repeated requests to sing Danny Boy by my intoxicated grandmother.

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"Weejie - I’m sure your man Tom is a wonderful, kind hearted, man. However, in the rankings of session killers, here is where I think the Djembe sits -
"

I would place a half p*ssed Highland piper who cannot hold a beat at a higher level - and maybe a banjo (bar about half a dozen good players) at a higher ranking (you are not a banjo player, are you perchance?).

It’s all down to personal opinion, anyway - and folkies are not short of opinions.

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"All I don’t get is how it can feel musically rewarding to repeat practically the exact same 1-second sequence for an entire set…"

O Child, it is the practice of humility. It is the vanquishing of the ego, the rendering of spiritual sacrifice.

P.S. What’s the profane capital of Australia? I think I would rather live near there.

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it’s nimbin with its hemp embassy. Survivors all of them, right into the third generation of hippies…and what do they end up doing? playing irish music. jeez, talk about the long way round the block.
bong on.

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"All I don’t get is how it can feel musically rewarding to repeat practically the exact same 1-second sequence for an entire set…"


It’s called a drone.

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Sigh—the brave people who go into drum-induced trances just never get an even break. Folks see a glassy-eyed man with a djembe and say, “Oh, my poor session.” Well, session schmession.

The insights this misunderstood shaman could bring us from the other side could very well transform entire realms: civil engineering, interventional radiology, butter substitutes, religion, post-coital admonishments, and economics. Bare minimum. So play on, thou Nimble Fingerer of the Multiverses.

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shamanic it surely is…]}
but it doesn’t seem to be an irish shamanic rhythm…
if there is such a thing..
which there probably is.

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Weejie - I respectfully disagree with your rankings. The p!ssed piper eventually passes out. The banjo player - even a shight one like me, can lay out a few tunes. But in my experience the Djembe player is typically an unwashed latent hippie looking to release his/her inner pagan by bashing the crap out of the thing in search of mystical celtic (hard C) exilirs. We’re not talking about Tito Puente here. We’re talking about the musical equivalent of a bull in a China shop, trampling the melody players under a thundering rumble. I’m not suggesting your man Tom fits into any of those stereotypes. Perhaps he is the most welcome man at the session. But I’d still rather play tunes with the hammered piper and the shight banjoist.

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"All I don’t get is how it can feel musically rewarding to repeat practically the exact same 1-second sequence for an entire set…"


It’s called a drone.

# Posted on March 29th 2011 by Weejie


@Weejie:

You’ve let some mischief out here.

A slew of people are going to write novels written from the point of view of a bagpipe drone: its boredom, its day-dreams, its pain when tinkered about with, its ambivalent feelings when used for unusual purposes, the outlandish places in which it grew and the vicissitudes of its manufacture. It might have come from Pakistan, and been discriminated against. All sorts of things - like the accordion in Annie Proulx’s "Accordion Crimes".

I am getting carried away…it’s all your fault…!! (:-

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🙂

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As long as he stays in his lair and he’s content to play along with recorded music we’re safe.

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I gotta have more cowbell.

If he doubles the rate he could play with the crowd behind the goals in some soccer parks.

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We seem to be getting a lot of these threads of late, where there is some incorrigible yet seemingly self-assured clueless numpty, like that character, or just poor newbie innocent soul, like the young guy on the "authentic Irish music" thread both of whom, by getting it so wrong, amuse us endlessly and make us feel superior about being in the know. We ought to watch out as I think it could become a bit stinky.
(And there’s me calling that guy a numpty - see? I’m doing it myself…)

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"A slew of people are going to write novels written from the point of view of a bagpipe drone: its boredom…."

Long ago, before the uilleann pipes were perfected, the chanter and drones were operated by separate players.
Some individual had to sit in a session and squeeze a bag with a drone sticking out of it all night - those purists wanting the sound of three drones had to employ the services of three drone players - the common stock (except the riff-raff drummers and their ilk) had not been invented.
The real purists insisted that the drone players altered the bag pressure in sync with the chanter player.
When the drones and chanter were incorporated into one instrument (even before the regulators were a twinkle in the pipe maker’s eye), people wrote on internet forums ridiculing the players of such unruly contraptions. The much maligned djembe player will have his/her day. No session will be complete without one.

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The funny thing is the rhythm he is playing is a traditional rhythm - from Ghana not Ireland 🙂

It can be used to accompany a reel, or more particularly part of a reel (the first part of the Pigeon on the Gate for example). Though the rhythm as played above would be a much stripped down version of what would suit the tune.

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There but for the grace of God go I.

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There but for the grace of Frankie Gavin goes God. 😉