Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

Hi All,
I have been to Two sessions so far and I am Totally NEW to Irish music, but the "virus" has hit me and I just Love it, playing together and joining in, it’s just Great. But…..
I have a chromatic harmonica, 16 hole in C and I’m practicing on some Irish reels. Just wondering, are there any more chrome-players doing Irish music??? It seems a rather hard instrument to play this type of music… does anyone think different? Thanks!

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And search Youtube and you should find some vids of them playing - both together and individually

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A player here in Moscow 🙂. He went from D and G diatonics to a custom G/F# chromatic, says a ‘high’ D/C# is too expensive. Some nice playing.

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In NYC there’s Don Meade – he’s a great player.

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Will Atkinson must have played an Irish tune somewhere along the line.

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Chromatic in C is tricky, I find. I’ve had some luck reversing the slide and playing tunes in Eb, but that’s probably because I play B/C box, and a C/C# harmonica is a parallel layout.
I’ve had some good results from a G chromatic, but the layout isn’t ideal, to my taste - the doubled root note makes it dificult to navigate. If you’re more used to the chromatic, of course, that’s less of an issue. If you’re keen to play on a chromatic, I’d try D and G.

I get the best results from a standard D diatonic, which suits about 80% of the tunes, or so. It’s only on the tunes that really lean on the C natural that it’s not going to work, and that’s a surprisingly small number. Some people prefer to play on the lower reeds, to match pitch with the fiddles, but I like the quicker response of the higher reeds, so I play exclusively in the middle register on a standard D, and fit in nicely with the whistles.

Your mileage will probably vary.

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A chromatic in C is a waste of time in Irish music unless you’re happy to play everything in the wrong keys and to never go to sessions. You will spend most of your time button-pushing to get notes instead of using the button for ornamentation. To be honest, there’s plenty of information on all this not only on TheSession but also on Chiff and in loads of other places. I can’t understand why the originator of this thread hasn’t done just a bit more homework before asking this question.

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They’re playing Danny Boy. All of them, without exception.

Honest. 😉

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Like I said, a C chrom is simply the wrong instrument for Irish music. Let’s not waste any more time on this one. Sure, he can learn to play everything in the wrong keys and somehow crack the ornamentation that way, but he can’t play along with recordings and he can’t play in sessions. You might as well buy a Hillman Imp especially to compete in the Monaco Grand Prix. It’s nowt to do with whether the instrument is chromatic or not. I’ve almost made a mini-career out of telling people that, in Irish, you either use diatonic harps (in D and G mostly) or you get chroms in D and G. You see, there’s this thing in Irish called "ornamentation." If you are pushing that button to get the notes of a tune, something you do not have to do with harps in D or G, you are simply not able to use ornamentation. I spend half my bloody life trying to get the harmonica accepted as a legit instrument in Irish music, which I firmly believe it is, then along comes someone to tell me that C harps are just hunky dory. Yeah, and sets of pipes pitched in F sharp are just fine too. Sheesh!

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I suppose I should have mentioned reversing the slide for better ornamentation, and I will (again) if pushed, but I strongly suspect that the OP is nowhere near even beginning to be able to consider such delicacies as yet.

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Try and get your hands on the Eddie Clarke CD, "Unheard" - great playing there

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Well let’s see. As I said, this stuff has been discussed ad nauseam. If he cares to look it up he won’t need to bother coming back. I apologise if I sound negative, but this topic has been aired to death.

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"G and D and related keys used in Irish music is not a problem because the instrument is chromatic."

Dick, the silver flute is also chromatic, but playing tunes doesn’t seem to work on that, for the same reasons - while you can get at the notes, they’re not well placed for what you’re trying to do.
If you’d ever tried playing a harmonica, you wouldn’t steer someone towards playing D major fiddle tunes on a C chromatic.

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The Murphy brothers mostly play in C, don’t they? (albeit on diatonics).

They have an annual get-together that the OP might find worth checking out.

Every dedicated moothie player I know has so many of the things that the question of "wrong key" doesn’t come up. The right one will always be somewhere in the bag.

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What outfits play on their records has little to do with what is right for playing in sessions. Eddie Clarke, bless ‘im, played a reverse-slide C harp a lot of the time. What you say about having the right ones in your bag is true to the extent that you can afford loads of the things if they’re diatonic 10-hole harps. Decent chroms are an whole nother issue. Bottom line here is that if you want to play chroms and you want to play in sessions then you have to have chroms in D and G. Unless you’re a slide-flipper, in which case your harps need to be in G/F sharp and D/C sharp. Absolutely nothing else will do, honest. Put the C chrom on eBay and demiserify yourself.

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Let me add another voice to what Steve and Jon are saying. Get a D and G harmonica, especially the D, and things will go a lot better than trying to use a C chromatic. They are much better suited to the music.

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No need to get rid of the C harmonica, I’d say - just don’t expect it to bring you a lot of joy playing trad music.

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Here’s Bob Hodgson from Canberra playing for Contra dancers
- not an Irish tune in this clip, as far as I know, but he plays plenty
of Trad material on other occasions. Bob has a whole set of
chromatic harmonicas in various keys

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EbRJj6Amj8

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Hi Hilvert,

There’s one or two of us here. Paddy-richter tuned diatonics in my case, because thats what I’m used to, they’re cheaper and easier to maintain. I’ve never tried a chromatic. Keep at it and don’t be discouraged. Apparently Eddie Clarke’s one piece of advice on playing trad music was to learn an instrument other than the harmonica. Having said that, as a trad learner I’d say the advice of the posters above is good.

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There are just two slight advantages to using chroms in Irish music. First, there is a minority of tunes with awkward accidentals, such as Jenny’s Wedding with its C natural. Second, you can use the button for ornamentation, for which harmonicas have a limited armoury. However, getting ornaments this way will often give you "wrong" notes, which may not matter to you overly much, but you can improve matters buy buying chroms in C sharp and F sharp (instead of D and G) and flipping the slide. The major disadvantages to chroms are that good ones are not cheap, and that all chroms have the potential to be temperamental beasts, what with hard-to-access reeds, noisy and sticky slides that allow air to leak, and those pesky little windsaver valves which pop, click, jam, buzz and fall off. You can have a lot of fun in Irish with 10-hole harps in low D, G and A , preferably with the Paddy Richter retune, and that lot together will cost you a lot less than just one chrom.

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by buying. Bye bye.

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It doesn’t sound like Hilvert’s exactly a stranger to the chromatic. Who are you trying to convince with this tutorial?

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"I would not advise a Button accordion player that only one system was good for irish music, that is nonsense, some people get on with C C#,some with BC some with C#D , D D#, some with DG such as Tim Edey as far I am concerned the same thing applies to harmonicas."

I suppose that’s true. You can get by on a D diatonic, Paddy Richter, D and G chromatics, either straight or reversed (D/D# or D/C#), and there are some lovely players on the novelty harps.

C chromatic, however, isn’t going to work, any more than the silver flute will, and for the same reasons. A B chromatic, as I suggested above, would work for B/C-style playing. In that case, you’re not using the B "row" for your accidentals (any more than a B/C box player does) but you’d be using it for the notes that are on the B row: F#, C#, and sometimes E and B. But that’s not a C chrom, is it? On a C chrom, you’ll be playing in E flat (again, as I said above), which is not going to help much with most sessions.

"I understood that the purpose of this board was to help people."

I suppose it is. Let’s try to give useful advice, then, shall we?

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"C chromatic, however, isn’t going to work, any more than the silver flute will, and for the same reasons."

They aren’t remotely similar situations and you are talking crap.

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They’re precisely the same situation: the note you need is available, but not available with the immediacy required.
I spent a long time trying to coach a silver flute player in trad music (she was my girlfriend at the time) and it wasn’t until we got her a timber flute that she realized why it wasn’t going to work, ever. Similarly, I tried for a while to make the C chromatic work for tunes, but I ran into the same problems my girlfriend had had. In both cases, we were trying to use a tool that was fundamentally unsuited to the task.

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Sigh. The harmonica is my only instrument and I’ve spent decades on working out what the best strategies are for playing this music on harmonicas. C chromatics are the wrong instrument for this music IF you want to play in the right keys and IF you want to join in at sessions. Take it or leave it. Buy a C chrom and, believe me, you are making a rod for your own back. I can only tell you, can’t I. Theory and diagrams are useless. Put the thing in your gob, try to play a tune in D major or A Mixolydian and you will see immediately that you have wasted your money. Your ability to ornament is severely compromised. But go ahead. Listen to Paddy. Or you could listen to his namesake, Brendan, who is a damn sight better than anyone posting here and he knows what’s what. And that is my one and only Kevin Burke/jig moment, I promise.

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So now we’re all agreed that you’re not going to get a lot of mileage out of playing tunes in D on a C chromatic?

That’s nice, it’s nice when we all agree.

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Thank You so much everyone for posting Your replies, it’s a Pleasure reading through them all. First off I’m not trying to "Convince anyone", sorry if I gave anyone that idea, and secondly I’m a bit stuck with my chromatic… I am aware that the easiest way would be to BUY the best suitable harmonicas for Irish tunes, like a diatonic Tremolo in D, but I just Love my Chrome and I was wondering if I was the only person struggling to play a reel in D on a C Chromatic that’s all, I was just wondering if there were any Fellow-Strugglers so to speak… I have the Only Tremolo-tuned Chromatic in the world, the Suzuki SCT-128 and I am Over the Moon with this piece of kit so I want to use this harmonica to play Anything, just because technically it’s possible. And this harmonica only comes in a 16-hole key of C.
Sorry if I gave anyone some confusing ideas, it would be nice to find somebody to practice together on some Irish tunes.
Have a look if You want on my Youtube channel, user "kazhilly". NOT an advertisement of Any kind, but just to show what I mean and where I’m coming from.
Best Regards to All of You and Many Thanks again!!
Hilvert

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And I know that Brendan Power is working on his book how to play Irish on a C chromatic… I can’t wait for that book and I will definitely get it, should be interesting…

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AFAIK, Brendan Power wrote book about playing Irish music on stock chromatics, where slider lifts note by half tone. Here’s a link - http://brendan-power.com/Play%20Irish%20Music%20on%20the%20Chromatic.htm. You can see there’s nothing about C harmonica, only about D and G.
I do play Irish music on harmonica by myself and the best way I know by now is to play it on D and G diatonics (Paddy Richter are better) and reverse slide chromatic in G/F#.
You can follow Steve Shaw advice and play music now or you can try and play it on a C chromatic, spend couple of month and then get D and G diatonics 🙂

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If you can find Tommy Basker’s recording, he was a great character who lived in Cape Breton and had a wonderful repertoire of Irish tunes on harmonica.

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I have Basker’s CD "The Tin Sandwich" - solidly Scottish material. Did he do another one with Irish tunes, or only play Irish music in private?

I really can’t imagine that style fitting in to an Irish session at all, anywhere.

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@ poster. Tom Byrne. none better

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Thank you, Orm. The book you mention was reviewed in detail by me in Harmonica World some time ago, and I thoroughly recommend it for anyone interested in playing chrom in Irish music. It is the definitive guide and it is excellently paced. Brendan was, at the time, working on a similar guide to playing reverse-slide harps in Irish music, though I’m not sure whether it’s available as yet. Now this bloke Hilvert has bought a Suzuki tremolo chrom, just about the most expensive piece of kit on the market bar customised chromatics for top pros. He can clearly afford good gear, so, Hilvert, here you are. Buy yerself a D and a G chrom, a hundred and fifty quid the pair. While you’re at it, buy a couple of 10-hole diatonics in low D and G. If I have it wrong and you’re really hard up, stick the Suzuki on eBay. You’ll get enough to pay for all those harps I mentioned and get plenty of beer money in the change back. There you go. And stop listening to people who suggest that a B/C box is anything like the same beast as a chromatic harmonica. It’s a lovely theory, but we all know how useful theory is in this music. There’s more bad advice on this thread than on any I’ve seen since…

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And Tommy Basker, Eddie Clarke and the rest are superbly inspirational, and a great guide to some techniques, but my focus is always on playing the harmonica in pub sessions, and properly at that. Were they around today they would freely admit that what you hear on recordings is not necessarily what you should be trying to replicate down the pub, especially with regard to keys.

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Well, if you love your chromatic you’ll probably keep it anyway, even if it does not work out for trad. Like me and my Ovation 12-string guitar…

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It is not dogmatic to say that it is simply impossible to use ornamentation anything like effectively on a C chromatic if you want to play this music in the right keys. It’s a hard fact, and anyone deliberately choosing or recommending that path that path is being somewhat perverse. This is not dogma, it’s fact. And the comparison with B/C boxes is simply not valid. On the box you have access to both rows at once. On the harmonica you have to shut off one "row" completely with the button at all times. To play the box, say in D, you are crossing the rows all the time to get the notes, but at no time is one of the rows shut off by a button. This means you can ornament tunes effectively by working both rows at once. Just think before you theorise. With respect, you are issuing bad advice I’m afraid. Harmonicas are not ideally suited to Irish music, therefore there simply has to be an element of taking the path of least resistance, not deliberately choosing to make things harder for yourself.

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Steve, have you ever tried playing B/C style on a chromatic?
It sounds a lot like you’re theorizing here.
I’ve tried it, and while I’m not giving up the box for it, it works fine. If you want rolls and crans, you’re not going to get them, but I don’t think you’re going to get them on a D chrom, either.

D on a C chrom is just silly - it’s possible to play a tune that way, but not well. Reminds me of Burke’s comment on the mandolin, that it takes a genius to be mediocre on it.

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Yes, Jon, I know that’s a hobby horse of yours. But pray tell me which bit of my last post was anything to do with theorising. You simply cannot ornament tunes as well as on a D or G chrom because you do not have the two rows available at once, unlike the box player. That is not theorising, it’s a fact. The only theorising I will do is to theorise that anyone playing a tune on a B harmonica is guaranteed to be not playing it as well as a similar player on a D harmonica. As I have said ad nauseam, if you don’t take the path of least resistance you are simply making a rod for your own back.

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As far as I can tell, you haven’t tried playing tunes in E flat on a C harmonica - what I’m calling B/C style. You think it would probably not work, based on your idea of what it would be like to play a B/C button box, which as far as I know you also haven’t done. That’s theorising.

I’ve tried it. It works for me, better than D or G chromatics. I’d do it more, if I had more time in the day and maybe a chromatic that I liked the sound of, but I’ve done it enough to know that I can get through pretty much any tune I know comfortably, and without the contortions required to play in D on a C.
That’s experience.

If you insist that theory wins out over experience, that’s dogma. Much as it pains me to agree with the crypto-Miles, you’re speaking the Revealed Truth here, not anything that you actually know.

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Jon Kiparsky, is it possible for you to post any audio of playing on C harmonica?

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I can put that on my stack of stuff to do. I’d probably like it better if I took a little time to get my lip in order - playing more box and whistle these days, hardly any harmonica. But I’ll try to come up with something this weekend, if I remember.

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I was going to ask the same thing. And I would also like to ask why the hell I would ever want to play a tune in E flat on anything, frankly. The lads would think I’d gone doo-bloody-lally tap. I understand that certain sessions may be a semitone up. Good for them, but stuff ‘em, says I. And, for your info, I did once have a B/C button box. So there. What I know about it is that you have two rows of notes available to you at all times and that you have to cross rows to play tunes in D, G and the modes. What I do know about chromatic harmonicas is that you have one row available until you press the button, when you have a different row available, and never the twain shall meet. Totally different. Which means that the potential for ornamentation, using both rows, is severely compromised on a harmonica in B. So I look forward to hearing you play tunes in D and G and the modes on your B harp, complete with ornaments. Beware. I’m an expert when it comes to working out what key a harmonica is in when I hear a tune, and my bullsh*t filter will be fully on.

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If you remember? I won’t let you forget!

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No, I am not saying anything incorrect. You are forgetting that you must press a button to access the other row on the harp. Maybe you only play diatonics and don’t get this, how would I know. The whole point which you are ignoring is that both rows on the box are accessible at the same time for ornamentation. This is totally opposite to the situation with the chromatic harmonica. You can play any tune on any chromatic harmonica in any key you like if you can be arsed, but you will not be able to employ anything like effective ornamentation unless you are using either a D or G chrom or a C#/F# harp with flipped slide. Any other axe and you are doing too much button-pushing just to get the notes of the diatonic scale to be able to use the button for ornaments. In contrast, there is no button-pushing to access the other row on a B/C box. You know, I’ll bet that even intelligent non-harmonica players can see this, if they are not actually reading this stupid thread whilst p*ssing themselves laughing at some of the daft suggestions being made. Still, don’t listen to me. We will see the truth this weekend when Jon puts up his recordings of him playing D and G tunes (in D and G, not E flat, eh? 😀 ) on a B harp with full ornamentation, won’t we? Heheh.

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"C#/F# harp" means either a C# or an F# harp, not some wicked hybrid, just to clarify.

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"Beware. I’m an expert when it comes to working out what key a harmonica is in when I hear a tune, and my bullsh*t filter will be fully on. "
"If you remember? I won’t let you forget! "

You know, I gave up playing music for money so I wouldn’t have to play for arseholes, and I’m not about to start doing it for free.
I don’t mind trying to make some time to get my chops in order to try to demo a style of playing for someone, but I’ll be damned if I’m going to jump through hoops for a self-proclaimed master of the instrument who’s proud of being too lazy to even try out a new idea before he declares it impossible - especially when that Mustard Master is being a rude little twit about the whole business.

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Are you two still bickering? Have you no homes to go to? 😉

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Jon, Steve, i really do not want to offense someone. I have G/F# chromatic, but i’ve never tried a B/C style on it (it means to play in A instead of D, i suppose, and D instead of G). There’s some tunes that are nice to play in second position - D on G harmonica, but it can be played in diatonic style - f.e. Connaughtman’s Rambles in D played on G harmonica. Another example - Wind That Shakes The Barley - it’s really simple on a D harmonica, but it’s not so easy to play it on a G/F#.

I think there is a similarity between box and harmonica, but there is just an easier way to play on harmonica at appropriate key on appropriate harmonica. But if someone can do it - i really like to hear it, i’m not joking.

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"But if someone can do it" - i mean B/C style

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That’s exactly it, Orm. Hey, Jon, who’s bickering? I’m just waiting to hear what you said you might do this weekend, that’s all. If you choose to pass on it, no problem! I’m absolutely with Orm on this. If anyone thinks they can cut it on a B harmonica I would be very interested to hear it. Naturally, I assume that we are talking about the tunes being played in the right keys with ornamentation just as good as on D or G chroms, or on flipped C# or F# chroms. That, surely, has to be the acid test. Saying it can be done is one thing. The proof of the pudding is in the demonstration. By the way, I’m not a self-proclaimed anything. I don’t even use chroms that much, though I don’t go anywhere without my D and G ones.. All I said was that the harmonica is my instrument and my only one (unless you want to hear my bones/bodhran 🙂 I also invoked the name of a man whose playing is far better than anyone’s in this thread and who has written a superb tutor on playing the chromatic in Irish music. He recommends D and G harps and gives very detailed reasons why in the book. I heartily recommend it to anyone who would prefer not to take my word for it. His first name is Brendan, not Paddy, just to avoid confusion.

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No, I am not saying that you can’t apply SOME ornamentation techniques on a B harmonica (and fer chrissake let’s all agree to call it what it is, huh?). What I am saying is that some ornamentation attempts are going to sound a bit weird and some will not be possible at all. The harmonica is limited enough with regard to ornamentation without deliberately making things more awkward still. The way to use a chrom in Irish is to select an instrument which is in the same key as the tune (or at least the one nearest related to the mode of the tune). Yes, and cross-harp is really good for tunes with gapped scales. The whole point is to avoid button-pushing just to get notes of diatonic scales. The aim is to have all button-pushes available for ornamentation as far as possible, not to get notes (other than those very occasional accidentals, such as C naturals in D tunes). Health warning to anyone contemplating spending money on a chrom: there is a lot of very poor advice in this thread. Research elsewhere before parting with your dough. Sigh.

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Why don’t you direct the poor chap to your harmonica Youtubes. That’ll convince him of how sound your advice really is, I’m sure.

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If I am playing a D tune on a B chromatic I have to use the slide quite a lot just to get the notes of the diatonic D scale. It’s as simple as that, Dick. I know all about tongueing and triplets and jaw-flicks, but the whole point of using a chrom at all is to give you a greater range of ornamentation. The whole object of this is defeated if you are deliberately not using an instrument in the key of the tune (or at least one which can play a Dorian, Aeolian or Mixolydian tune without using the slide to get notes). I would love to hear a sample of your playing a D or G tune on a B chrom complete with ornamentation beyond that available on a diatonic harp. If this is not possible, then there is no point using a chrom at all.

Actually, it’s possible that I wouldn’t like to hear you doing it after all…

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Quick quiz, Steve: B chromatic, reversed. What notes are available?

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Every note of every chromatic scale. Next question…

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Yes I know. Your point being…?

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"Every note of every chromatic scale. Next question…"

Smartass. Okay, B chromatic, reversed. What notes are available with the slide out?

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"Why don’t you direct the poor chap to your harmonica Youtubes. That’ll convince him of how sound your advice really is, I’m sure. " Steve, it is possible Paddy Power has it right. Whether or not he can play well shouldn’t be the point. YMMV.

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I’m still very interested in audio/video samples of B/C style PLAYING on harmonica.

In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they’re not.

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Not smartass at all. I answered exactly the question you asked as directly as possible. B chromatic, slide reversed, slide out, is basically the same as a solo-tuned diatonic harp in C except for those doubled-up tonic blow notes. Put it on eBay and trade it in for a C# harp and reverse that one. Brilliant. All the notes of the diatonic D scale. As Michael might say, viola!

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They’re not listening to us, Orm. The proof of the puddin’, eh? 🙂

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You have a point, Ben, but we are talking about Dick here, who is a guru when it comes to all things reedy, and he does do harmonica Youtubes with a tuition-orientated bent. It should be an absolute cinch for him to show us all how a B harmonica can play Irish tunes in the correct keys with all ornamentation in place. I await the pleasure.

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"B chromatic, slide reversed, slide out, is basically the same as a solo-tuned diatonic harp in C except for those doubled-up tonic blow notes"

Okay, so most of the notes of the D scale, plus that C natural that you’re going to use a lot, are all available without the slide. So this:
"If I am playing a D tune on a B chromatic I have to use the slide quite a lot just to get the notes of the diatonic D scale"
just ain’t so, unless by "quite a lot" you mean "once in a while".

True, you do have to use the slide for the F# and the C#, but in return you get a much better layout in terms of breath changes, and for me that’s a fair trade-off. In addition, the slide notes are off of notes of the scale, which makes them a bit easier to get to in most cases. It’s not a bad way to go.

But since the chromatic is a clumsy beast, and it doesn’t sound as good as a diatonic, and you can’t hear it in a session, if I really need to play tunes on a harmonica I’ll stick with a regular D diatonic. Sounds good, plays fast, and you can hear it without amplification. What’s not to like?

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Using the slide for two notes out of seven is hardly "once in while." and those pesky C naturals in D tunes you refer to are relatively rare. You’re much better off playing a D crom for D tunes with C naturals anyway. Just one button push in a blue moon. Of course, the button is still needed for F sharps in G tunes on your B chrom. Not at all on a G chrom. OK, so you have a B harp and you love it. Carry on. But anyone contemplating playing Irish on a chrom would be stupid to go for a B harp as first choice.

Love from Steve Shaw (B.Sc in Common Sense from the Department Of The Bleedin’ Obvious at the University of Bitter Experience)

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

And anyone holding a C chrom would be a fool not to try the different approaches on it before spending a lot of money on a useful harmonica. The C is not a useful harmonica for this music, unless you play B/C and live near an E flat session, but you can certainly figure out whether you prefer C#/D, D/D#, or B/C style before you blow a hundred and some bucks on one.
And if it turns out that they prefer smooth and easy B/C style to the huffing and puffing on a D-row harp, then they’ll save some money and aggravation. 🙂

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

The OP is in the Netherlands.

Maybe that makes a difference. C/F boxes are common there. It might make more sense to adapt the music to the instruments he has around him (which he might already be playing with in different repertoire) than to get the "correct" pitch when there’s no chance of somebody with a D flute dropping in.

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

Except, if you read the OP’s bio, he lives in Coventry!

What’s all this Dick/Paddy kerfuffle?

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Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

If what you do on a D harp is "huffing and puffing" then I suggest you may need lessons. In any case,the whole aesthetic of playing up and down a single row, whether on a box or a harmonica, is to exploit the air-direction changes to great rhythmic effect, not see them as an impediment. If I were you I’d grab your C harp and go and join a jazz club.

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

how about the seydel sampler in D ad G tuning?! ( 12 holes solo tuning ) button in is D button out is D…anyone experiances with that harmonica?

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

The Seydel "Sampler" is a great harmonic for Irish sessions. Plays well at speed and it can be loud if required. Simple chord accompaniment is possible and easy. I use chromatics for airs, waltzes and song accompaniment but prefer the Sampler for general sessions. The G/D model is key G slide out.

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

Brendan Power is the top man, for Irish music on on the harmonica. He didn’t record much, but there are plenty clips of him on you tube.

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

Eddie Clarke’s name has been mentioned a few times already, but he made a spectacular album with Clare fiddler Joe Ryan for Green Linnet in the early 80s. It’s posted here:

https://thesession.org/recordings/1632

I read somewhere once that the label mostly made it up on cassette. I got my copy through an Amazon download. Well worth checking out, just fiddle and ‘arp throughout.

Re: Any Harmonica Players playing Irish music??

Flippin’ ‘eck, I sound bad-tempered on this old thread… 🙁