Collective nouns…

Collective nouns…

At the Wig Museum we were discussing appropriate collective nouns for the instruments and maybe instrument players in the Tradition…

A forest of fiddles or fiddlers
A scrape of fiddlers
A flob of flutes or flautists
A confusion of whistles or whistlers
A bollocking of banjos or banjoists
An Open Mic Nite of six string devils or six string devillers
A cacophony of bodhrans or goatbashers
A mousaka of bouzoukis or bouzouki botherers
A suck of harmonicas or gob iron/ tin sandwich players
A round of tin sandwich players?
A hot water bottle collection of pipers
An inaudibility of mandolins
A forhoja of spoon janglers (‘Forhoja’ is the typically incomprehensible Ikea name for a cutlery tray)
An unwelcomeness of bass trombones
A brilliance of baritone ukulele player (no collective noun technically necessary as there seems to be only one at present!)

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At a concertina workshop, once, there were 15 of us trying to learn the same tune. The collective noun that immediately sprang to mind was: A Jangle of concertina players.

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A twang of harpists

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A diddle of diddlers

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A screech of whistles
A crisis of pipes
A planxty of bouzoukis

I can’t take credit for those…

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An embarrassment of Böhm flautists

A semitone of piano accordionists

A novelty of Northumbrian pipers

A fair dinkum of stylophonists

A strewth of didge players

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A snooty-cynical-curmudgeoness of sessioners.
A pluck of harpists.
A three-chord-trick of backers.
A klezmerization of clarinets.
An unexpectedness of ‘cellos and violas.
A squawk of boxes.
An Orange Day Parade of lambegs.
A shrill of fifes.
A plunk of treble ukes or banjoleles.
A ‘if you’ve got the recording why do you need the dots’ of sight readers.

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ha ha.

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a murder of collective nouns

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A clutch of shakey egg ‘players’

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a load of arse

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a waste of time

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a scruttock of whelks

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A disappointment of pipers

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A snivel of sceptics.

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A string of harpists.
…true story.

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A racquet of Bodhranists

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A dearth of decent players (at many sessions.)

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A dribble of flutes.
A scrape of (beginner) fiddles.

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A saltmarsh of pipers.

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A slobber of flute players
An annoyance of punters
A squeeze of box players

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A chirrup of whistles.

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A drunken amalgamation of fiddle notes
A volley of banjo notes
A pile of bones
A sonic boom of GHB pipers
A farting of concertina notes
A surprising strumming of non-existent chords

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A warehouse of boxes.
Or.
A clatter of button boxes.
How about,
A grump of curmudgeons.

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A batter of bodhranists

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A headache of musicians!!

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A Pandoras box of pink oboes

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A slip of jigs

A silliest of threads

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A despair of beginner pipers, (I’m told the first 21 years are the worst)

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This sounds like collectivization to me.

Laurence

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Miles of metronomes.

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A scrotum of shaky egg players (for when there are just two of ’em).

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Heheh. I just realised. “Miles of metronomes…” 😀

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A metre or meter of metronomes is better.

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Meter or metre is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed “beats,” more subtle alliteration and more appropriate

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wow, i don’t feel so strange anymore. suddenly i feel… normal. Woah… XD lol, Muwahahaha!

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“Heheh. I just realised. “Miles of metronomes…” “

Yep, it’s more like a title or an epithet. Very medieval.