The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

Can anyone help me out here? In the song “The Galway Shawl” your man says he played “The Blackbird”, “The Stack of Barley”, “Old Rodney’s Glory” and “The Foggy Dew”. Now these are all hornpipes and I have found all of them except The Foggy Dew. I know the song “The Foggy Dew” but this is hardly a hornpipe. Does anyone know the hornpipe referred to in the song? Is it better known under a different name?
Be good.

Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

The Foggy Dew that I know is this one:

https://thesession.org/tunes/6862

But I don’t play it as a reel. I play it as a slow tune. I think this one was a song tune as well.

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Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

The Blackbird and Rodneys Glory are set dances(danced by solo
dancer)

Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

The English (or best known as English these days) song "The Foggy (Foggy) Dew" would work as a hornpipe; perhaps some version of that is meant? Father O’Neill’s Republican "Foggy Dew" used the tune of an older song "The Moorlough Shore" (which is well worth finding).

"The Galway Shawl", in some form, must predate the Easter Rising "Foggy Dew" by decades, but I don’t think there’s any evidence either way about how old the verse about the tunes is.

Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

Think you are barking up the wrong tree. The next line refers to her singing "each note like an Irish Linnet". So that would make the Foggy Dew - a song.

Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

Thanks everyone. Guess I will have to rethink this. Three out of four is probably enough anyway.
Be good.

Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

I live near Moorlough so i now have a plausible reason to play this tune which i like..well done

Re: The Foggy Dew Hornpipe

Looking for this tune I came across P.W. Joyce’s "Old Irish Folk Music and Songs", which has a song "The Foggy Dew" with words (at least the first verse) similar to the English one. The tune bears a VERY distant resemblance to "The Moorlough Shore" (aka the Republican "Foggy Dew") - the rhythm is identical, the overall contour is the same, but I can’t see how one could be derived from the other.

I got that from an ABC transcription off the web which included this note from Joyce:

- I learned this air when I was a child. Compare it with "Air thaobh na carraige bàine": Petrie, Ancient Music of Ireland, p. 143. Bunting, in his 1840 volume, gives a different air with the same name.

Maybe somebody could look those up and see if they shed any light on this. Every new bit of information makes it more confusing.