Trad against Ticks

Trad against Ticks

I hope I’m allowed to post this here, any musicians that are interested please contact Tick Talk Ireland at the address below, thanks in advance for any help that might be forthcoming…

Looking for traditional Irish musicians for a charity event in Dublin


Description:
Tick Talk Ireland are hosting their first Lyme Disease Conference in Clontarf Castle, Dublin 5-6 June 2012 (half day Tuesday & all day Wednesday).

We are looking for traditional Irish musicians (soloist or small group) willing to provide entertainment on the Tuesday evening for our German & American guest speakers. The music will take place in the bar area at Clontarf Castle in Dublin.

The event will bring well respected doctors & scientists in the field of tick-borne diseases. Inquiries are welcome at info@ticktalkireland.org

For more information on the event go to:
http://www.ticktalkireland.org/lymeconference.html


Application details:


If you are a flutist, fiddle player or play any other traditional musical instrument & would like to help us we would love to hear from you. Due to the confined area a soloist or small group would be preferred.
The informal event will take place on the evening of Tuesday 5th June in the Knight’s Bar, Clontarf Castle, Dublin http://www.clontarfcastle.ie/


Expenses will be covered. For application details contact us at info@ticktalkireland.org

Re: Trad against Ticks

I’ve tried playing them trad - it doesn’t keep them away.

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Trad and ticks seems like a bizarre juxtaposition, but I suppose they are both abundant in certain areas of Ireland. In fact my visits to Ireland usually involve, in between sessions, camping and sometimes walking in wild places, so I am more familiar than I would like to be with the little creatures. The number I have probably carried back with me to the UK doesn’t seem to have any noticeable effect on the Irish tick population.

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It’s a big issue in many rural areas in scotland, I’d think the upland areas of Ireland to be similar. Limes disease is on the rise and has a history of being largely ignored. Upping the profile of limes encephalitis etc has to be a good thing…….

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Contact Fergus Feeley down in Galway. He contracted tick borne Lyme disease many years ago. He has been an awareness advocate ever since.

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It’s not just the upland areas of Ireland, Solidmahog, ticks are rife in most areas of bogland where there’s a high degree of humidity thanks to decaying vegetable matter.

http://ticktalkireland.org

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The little blighters are also prevalent on the moorlands of the West Country in England. Basic protection when out walking in these areas is always to wear long trousers tucked into the socks and a long-sleeved top, the latter especially if there is waist-high foliage around. You’re not up on the moors as a sun-tanning exercise!

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Worst ticks I’ve had (well most horrible) were got just behind a pub. Went for a ten minute walk went back to my room and just happened to see something black just on the neck line of my shirt in the mirror. Massive horrible big black thing and after a further check, it was "things". Got them out ok but felt quite bothered by it until I left that place, 7 or 8 of them as big as a blokes pinky nail.

I usually check myself out after a walk but didn’t consider that particular walk to turn into a a tick safari. This was the north east corner of Argyll.

Plenty ticks by me but I’m more used to the humble deer tick which whilst a lyme’s (thanks for the spelling pat ;~) carrier, there at least cuter and much less shocking to find feasting on ones vitals.

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their

Having a poor spelling day :~|

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At least you can see ticks - enough to get them out. In Kentucky, I was pestered by chiggers. Can’t even see the buggas.

Do you think that ticks are particular about accordion players?

Ticks in the right boxes?

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"Trad against Ticks?"

(Damn. Clicked enthusiastically on this thread thinking it was going to be a campaign against metronomes… πŸ™ )

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The worst infestation of ticks I’ve encountered was on Inishmaan, Aran Is., about 9 years ago. It was impossible to venture off the road even for a minute without finding half a dozen or more crawling up my trouserlegs. I imagine these must have been in the larval stage, as they were barely as big as a pinhead and very pale brown, almost translucent. I made the mistake of pitching my tent in a field, and woke in the morning to see hundreds of tiny dots moving about in Brownian motion on the outside of the inner skin of the tent. On returning to the field later in the day, I realised that every blade of grass was covered with them, all lined up waiting for their prospective hosts. When I left, I bundled up the tent, stuffed it in my cycle pannier and didn’t take it out for a week; when I finally did, there they were, still milling about. The only thing I could do, short of incinerating the tent, was to immerse it in a barrel of water; after about 48 hours, that finally got rid of them all. Considering the number of ticks there were on the island, and the number I found on my clothing, surprisingly few actually got as far as getting their mouthparts into me - still, it was more than I would wish for in an entire lifetime.

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I live in a caravan on dartmoor ,and for some reason (must be good blood i spose) ticks love me,i always get em, about ten years ago i unsuccessfully removed one of the little blighters, leaving the head stuck in my arm, over the next few days my friends noticed red lines travelling up my arm,but i refused to go to the doctors (as always )anyway i spent 5 days in hospital as a result , it was pretty bad .so i for one know the dangers of ticks .
i often travel to dublin as my girlfriend is from galway ,will check
my scedule .

good luck

ps ……. apparently nasa reported that they had discoverd ticks
on the moon

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i think they called them luner ticks !!!! :o ….

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I picked up 35 ticks in one day in south-west Ireland in the summer of ‘77. I noticed a distinct tendency for them to congregate on those parts of my manly anatomy that consisted largely of softer skin with lots of folds and crevices, precisely in those places where I was *not* going to hold a glowing cigarette five millimetres from the little sods….

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35 tick’s on your gadget ,thats pretty serious i thought i got it bad
, you should change your username to , tickus dickus

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Tickus Dickus!! LOL - you’re in good form tonight Silas πŸ™‚

I don’t come across that many, despite spending a good bit of time in vegetated areas. Sea cliffs, I’ve always found worst. More inclined to wear long trousers though than shorts. Midges - that’s another story. Pesky blighters - can never figure out what they do when the wind is blowing and/or there’s no humans around to suck. And they say it’s only the females that bite.. nice thought for the day that’s in it.

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Hussar, avoid Ardnamurchan and Glen Etive for starters. My ex-flatmate went wild camping in Glen Etive a couple years ago and found forty or so ticks on her. Several came home in her sleeping bag and I was finding the damned things wandering around my flat for weeks afterwards. On Ardnamurchan, they kept trying to invade the tent, crawling across the door. Little buggers.

Also, long grass, heather, and bracken are bad news. After a certain (mis?)adventure battling through lots of bracken and doing spme vDiff heather climbing when we decided to not take the trail off the Forcan Ridge in Kintail, I swore we were going to be covered in the damned things, but didn’t see one. Either we smelled bad or ticks don’t like Kintail! You’re lucky, Solidmahog!

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No-one but the ticks thmselves knows why they favour the places they do. I’ve never seen one in my locality of Mid Wales, in woodland, farmland, moorland or anywhere (although they do exist here, as people find them on their cats and dogs). Yet, not 20 miles away, in the Elan Valley, they’re rife.

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Good God, The Saddle and the Forcan! Haven’t been up there since the summer of ‘76, when we stood atop The Saddle in swimming gear! I distinctly recall these big brown winged things that got on your skin, and when you tried to squash ‘em the wings dropped off and they just carried on eating you as if nothing had happened. The youth hostel warden at Ratagan told us they were stag ticks. They were nothing like those horrid little sheep ticks that I think we’re talking about. I was in northern Scotland several summers in a row and ‘76 was the only time I came across these little buggers. Some of the hotels were buying road tanker loads of water, it was so parched that summer. We visited the hotel at Tomdoun (sizing it up for our honeymoon, we were) and there was not a drop of water in the place for anything (they still had beer!). You couldn’t make it up!

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"big brown winged things that got on your skin…The youth hostel warden at Ratagan told us they were stag ticks."

Maybe that’s what they call them locally, but they weren’t ticks. Ticks are arachnids, like spiders, not insects, so they can’t possibly have wings. (Birds, bats, insects & aircraft have wings, nothing else - unless you include football teams, hospitals, maple seeds, politics etc.). They could have been something from the midge/mosquito family, or perhaps some other kind of biting fly, like horseflies (which actually tear into your flesh rather than just piercing it).

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Hey, I didn’t say I agreed with him! But a local name, no matter how inappropriate, might just jog something in someone’s head, I thought… They were most decidedly not horseflies, I know that much. My boozer’s degree in botany was inadequate for making a decent identification of the minibeast in question.

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Yertis, Lipoptena cervi, the deer ked. They bite harmonica players, but only on the exhale. Not sure whether they’re attracted by the hot air or the excess carbon dioxide. πŸ˜‰

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They may have been clegg (sp?) flies. They have a nasty bite. I don’t remember having any bother with them on the Forcan Ridge or any other mountain, as they seem to prefer low level assaults. I’ve had those things attack my horse when out on a trail ride and she becomes the one speed wonder: gallop! Midges are more of a problem in the Highlands.

Did you go over the Forcan to get to the Saddle, Steve? It’s a great day out, if you like your exposed knife edge ridges. It was so much fun and a little bit scary.

My only insect misadventure in Ireland was when a huge number of baby spiders invaded the space between the fly and the inner tent at the end of Willie Week one year. I didn’t want to collapse the tent with those things in there, as it would squash them into the tent and I was pretty squeamish about that. So a certain session.org member earned his Man Points of the week by crawling between tent and fly with a can of Raid and disposing of the spiders.

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Horseflies tearing ? Often they seem to be able to make a painless incision - I guess they have to be lucky in not catching a nerve. Initially painless that is.

Anyhow, back to ticks. Those advising tucking trousers into socks etc forgot to mention not having a shirt without a button-up front and keeping it tucked in.

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not having a shirt with a …

I thought cleggs were horseflies.

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Also, gaiters are your friend. They keep the bog out of your boots as well as the ticks!

Nah, David, it’s actually the Lib Dem leader. πŸ™‚

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" Either we smelled bad or ticks don’t like Kintail! You’re lucky, Solidmahog!" DrSS

The former I’d say πŸ™‚

And yes, I am lucky, luckier than a certain fiddler that lived for a time on the other side of midge mountain, he contracted lyme’s and fortunately for him happened to identify the signs at the horrible red ring stage, no not the last night curry post evacuation signs, but the infectious tick bite signs.

He was forced off the drink for 6 weeks, so lyme’s for him can’t have been a picnic. Quite a few of my pals have had lymes at some point. Back in the late 80’s it was popular just to call it ME.

Checking yourself out after a walk and keeping an eye on any bites you pick up is the ticket.

Most ticks I’ve seen were under the windowsill soffit at the back of the house.

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I wish we were closer, I’d gladly give time to a good cause - education and further understanding of a nasty and growing problem - on more than one continent…

On tales, I once explored a small island and found the carcass of a dead deer in thick brush. As I poked at it I suddenly noticed movement all over, it was blanketed with ticks, which I suspect may have been the cause of death. It was weird. I’ve never seen so many in one place…

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Here (nr. Looe in Cornwall) we used to get a lot of big ( maybe 5mm wide when inflated) black ticks but now little (only 1 or 2mm wide) reddish brown ones are more common. Anyone know, are these deer ticks? Which are the most dangerous?

No, he doesn’t make lutes, I don’t think, he makes flutes…

Ticks ~ a few links, plus a PDF which is excellent for these Isles

Eureka! I may have the answer to why ticks have increased…

I’ve only very occasionally found a tick on myself, in the course of walking / angling / camping in upland since the Sixties. I would add that most of this was back in the 1960s / 70s / 80s rather than more recently, and a thought has occurred to me as to why ticks really might have been less abundant in the places I visited in my youth than in the places where sundry posters have incurred such impressive and horrifying infestations in, I assume, more recent years.

This thought is, the ticks have multiplied because, in recent decades, the population of starlings - in the UK, anyway - has slumped. They used to be ubiquitous and Britain’s most numerous bird. They would sit on the back of beasts and pick out ticks or other parasites, and flocks of them - I am fairly sure - would alight on pasture and hillsides and pick up invertebrates, no doubt including ticks, from grass or bracken or heather.

(Jackdaws and other corvids, whose numbers haven’t declined, will perch on cattle or deer in this way, but although I don’t know for sure I imagine they would scare sheep in a way starlings wouldn’t, seeing they are bigger than starlings. In that case, the ticks on the sheep would go un-culled. Also, a biggish flock of starlings would probably get through a lot more ticks than the usual smaller flocks of jackdaws.)

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What a very informative thread!

When I worked as a sylviculturist on The Wyndham Estate in Somerset was when I encountered them most. The neighbouring Quantock Hills had quite a large herd of red deer there.

One of the possible causes of the incrrease might be attributed to the non burning policies.

Time was when heather and bracken were burnt, but now the bracken is poisoned with a long nameed chemical with an x in it, can’t think of the name.

So whereas ticks got fried and numbers were kept down now they are in larger quantities.

I believe that there is a similar problem with moorland birds now and many more parasites are having an adverse effect on species such as the red grouse, again, because the old strip burning has ceased.

All the best with the concert

Brian x

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ceolachan, thanks for those links. Very informative. Now I’m terrified. The dog picks up loads of these little red beasties in the summer, and sleeps on the bed…

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The deer tick population out here is on the rise more than likely because the deer population is also on the rise. (Folks here think deer are cute.) The mountain lion population is also on the rise. Apart from motorists, the lions are the deers’ only predators. (Motorists seem to be the lion’s only predators.) As to lyme desease, … [Shyly holds up hand] yup, I had a bout with it too, in the first four months of 2010. Lots of fun.

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Sympathies AQ, I hope nothing has remained. Someone I knew had something like arthritis afterwards that has lasted… I think they got to finally figuring out what the problem was a bit late, and the damage was done…

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Got the tick bite while harvesting arundo donax — for anyone who’s looking for relevance in this tangent. Doing fine, thanks for asking, C. Our medical-industrial-insurance system is in denial about Lyme disease. Most docs are reluctant to take on a prospective Lyme case because the insurance industry doesn’t want to pay them for all their work and the course of pharmaceuticals. That’s a story for another day.

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The friend who continues to suffer is an American… πŸ™ I should stop there, but there have been some telling and sad documentaries on that subject here.

We have a friend with terminal cancer that has been getting the shaft from the system there. Fortunately some decent folk have stepped forward to help, as best they can… I suspect we all have a bit of that selfish streak in us… I’m not sure how to overcome it and raise understanding, awareness and care… On this one mentioned case, the terminal cancer, the pharmaceutical multi-national that made the one drug of hope for him have somehow run out of it, and as they seem to think it isn’t profitable enough they aren’t showing any promise of more stock in the near future. The assholes… Sorry, off topic and yet ~