(put down that) electric violin

(put down that) electric violin

does anyone have any recommendations for a DI or preamp or in-ear monitoring or effects or anything else that will help hearing a solid body electric violin over a loud band? (I swear this is related to Irish music - sorry)

Re: (put down that) electric violin

Preamp. If you must. Or just say no?

I’m not being judgmental, honest. I have owned three solid-body fiddles (two Zetas and a Jensen) myself. All sold now. None of them could come anywhere near the sonic qualities of a good acoustic fiddle. In fact, I played in two fairly loud bands (drums, electric guitars) with both kinds of fiddle, and preferred the hollow-body approach overall. (With a good preamp, running through the PA system--don’t bother with an amp.)

But more to the point: I don’t play in loud bands any more. No need. Why put up with all that gollywampus when you can get the same excitement (minus the hearing loss) by ditching electricity altogether, and getting the most out of the fiddle itself?

Re: (put down that) electric violin

For straight violin sound I use the DI Plus.
http://www.ultrasoundamps.com/image-viewer-diplus.html
There are several other brands of preamp that are very similar but I like this one for the phantom power operation.

For playing in a Celtic Rock format with bass and drums I prefer a guitar effects pedal.
http://www.bossus.com/gear/productdetails.php?ProductId=1001&ParentId=248

However I do agree with Mr. Gait and only use an acoustic fiddle. For that I use ’The Band".
http://www.headwaymusicaudio.com/product_theband_acoustic_pickup.php

I was also reading up recently on The Realist Violin which seems to be made specially for plugged in applications.
http://www.realistacoustic.com/about_violin.php
I wouldn’t mind trying out one of these some time.

Hope that helps you out with some options.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

MagRoibin--Happens I have a Realist 5-string now (the “standard” model, not the “pro”). Relatively good sound, but it’s definitely a compromise acoustically. Although the 5th strind complicates things, and the “pro” model is probably better that way.

But it’s hard to imagine that a violin with the electronics built into the body (adds noticeable weight) is ever going to have the finer qualities of a good handmade acoustic fiddle. Although if you’re playing with a rock band, that’s a moot point.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

[*But it’s hard to imagine that a violin with the electronics built into the body (adds noticeable weight) is ever going to have the finer qualities of a good handmade acoustic fiddle. Although if you’re playing with a rock band, that’s a moot point.*]

Most of the Sonic Violins electro-acoustics have a good acoustic sound, and good performance when plugged in. You can get a fair amount of gain too, without feedback problems.
They are good quality Chinese-made instruments with very good electronics. I owned a Classic Plus 5-string model.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

Thanks for your help! I do have a pickup for my fiddle, but I don’t have a preamp so I’ve never used it. I’d probably get more use out of a preamp for acoustic, and the electric actually doesn’t belong to me (it was left at my house - cue banjo/accordion joke about leaving the door unlocked). I happen to have a guitar effects pedal though so I might try that first.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

You have to get used to the sound coming from the speakers rather than your fiddle. It’s a bit weird at first when nothing happens under your ear, but you soon adapt.

Posted by .

Re: (put down that) electric violin

You don’t need a pre-amp - there is one built into the violin.
If you are plugging straight into the mixer or amplifier you don’t need a DI box, just use the line input jack. If your mixer is remote, with a stage box and snake, then you will probably need a DI box so that you can use a balanced mike input.

You don’t need electronic FX - all the effects you need are built into your right arm.

But there is one pedal you might find useful - a graphic EQ pedal like the Behringer EQ700. You can use the EQ to notch out the feedback frequency, then set the volume levels on the pedal and desk so that with the pedal off you are at ‘backing volume’, with the pedal on you go up to ‘solo volume’ with the risk of feedback minimized.

Not hearing yourself over the band puzzles me - if you can’t hear yourself you just turn your fiddle up in the mix (or better still, turn down whichever instrument is drowning you out), that’s the whole point of using an electric fiddle.

In ear monitors. There are some very cheap in ear systems available now. I’ve never tried them but I suspect that as supplied they won’t be very good - they come with ordinary Walkman type earbuds. But the electronics are likely to be more than adequate, so if you were to add some proper fitted earbuds they would probably work well enough.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

Sorry I got confused by all the talk of Sonic Violins.

Your solid fiddle might need a preamp - some have it built in, some don’t. If there is a battery in the fiddle then everything I’ve just said still applies, if there isn’t a battery then you do need a pre-amp, but everything else applies.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

here’s the thing aboput hearing yourself on a loud bandstand that most acoustic players forget…you can’t hear what is happening out in front because you are (or should be) behind the PA. Get a small powered monitor and a direct box to go with your preamp. Plug your preamp and all that into the direct box and then take the line out of the directbox into your monitor and send the main output to the PA. Put the monitor on the floor and point it at yourself so you can hear.

Re: (put down that) electric violin

One of the settings on my effects pedal is “Angus” - do you think that’s Angus Grant? Thanks again for all your suggestions…

Re: (put down that) electric violin

My fiddle-player uses a Swordfish electric fiddle with a footpedal graphic equaliser to get the sound he wants, then has it piped back to him from the foldback.
If your band doesn’t use foldback, and the output sound levels can be critical to avoid feedback ( or howlround, as the BBC calls it ), then obviously you need either an onstage monitor of your own, or an onstage backline amp of your own. Surely the rest of the band want to hear you as well ?