Any trad eqivalent?

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

Yes, most instruments are designed for two-handed operation - that is to say, you have to use two hands simultaneously to produce the notes.

It would be possible to play accordion (button or piano) one-handed, if you don’t use the basses, provided you have an arm to work the bellows. Of course, they are not generally made left-handed so, if, like Mr. McCarthy, you had only a left hand, you’d have to play it upside-down, but I don’t think that would be an insurmountable problem.

I have heard of people using some kind of attachment to hold a plectrum. Also, a few years ago in Milltown, I played with a fiddler with a prosthetic left hand, which he used as his bow hand.

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

This is why the well polished bugle is such a good option for the session. You can play it and have the other hand (if one has one of course) free to do wotteffah else you fancy with.

And let’s not forget Rick Allen of Def Leopard!

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

An uilleann piper at a session I used to go to played a tune (I forget which one…) and the B-part was entirely in the upper hand, so he would goof around with his "free" hand, scratching his head, drinking from his pint, shaking hands with others, then dropping his hand back to the chanter for the A-part. Also, for highland pipers, the A-part of Blue Bells with it’s long high notes is a good oportunity to wave with your right hand to people you know while on parade. Getting a laugh from a good tune is probably the trad equivalent of a concert performance in classical…

Posted by .

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

I have played in a Boston session with a harmonica player that had no hands, he used a harness to hold the harmonicas (never caught his name, but he is hard to forget). His example inspired me to continue playing one-handed harmonica during my recovery from shoulder surgery last year. If you love music, you will find a way to play it…

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

In the far off days of the past, there used to be a Music Hall in Chesterfield, under the "Vic Verandah". My dad (born 1923)used to tell me about one of the regular "turns". Apparently he had no arms (as a result of 1914-18) but would play the trumpet with his feet. I assume he would use his mouth as well mind, well, at least I hope so!

In fact, if anyome has any more information about this chap, I would like to find out more. I don’t even have his name.

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

here in switzerland we have 2 virtuosos of the pan pipes, one with ni hands at all, the other one , with just the left hand… they both play all kinds of classical and trad (but mostly rumanian)… and in a festival, I saw a one-hand recorder… in france, Vincent Blin had a paralysy of the left hand - for a fiddler, and a very good one - it must have bee a nighmare. but he took to the one row melodeon. i think - and hope- now he’ss recovered and can play fiddle again…

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

The traditional English Morris instrument was the Whistle and Dub…The whistle was a three hole pipe with a little finger hook which could be played with one hand. The Dub was a small drum hung round the neck banged with the other hand.

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

Isn’t that three holed whistle also called a tambor pipe? Because the wee drum is called a tambor?

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

tabor?

Posted .

Re: Any trad eqivalent?

Ooops, good catch, prof. I stand corrected.