DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Hi,

I’m desperately looking for some guidance in making the transition into being a session guitarist using DADGAD. I’ve played guitar for 15 years but, in spite of listening to the likes of Ian Carr for years, my playing has been limited to 4/4 rock/blues based stuff. But I want to be a functioning (and later bloody decent)session player and having watched some folk guitarists in sessions, I have no doubt that my fingers are mechanically capable of doing what they have to do. In spite of this, session playing with DADGAD remains a frustrating mystery to me. I have dredged through a pile of videos on you tube and some websites but they don’t seem to bring me any closer to having a clue what I should be doing with DADGAD in terms of backing up a fiddle or whistel or whatever in a session. Here are some basic questions that are driving me up the wall:

1. From what I understand, folk tunes are backed up by a group of chords which are determined by the key of the tune. So if the key is G, the chords played behind that will be some sort of combination of G, C, D, F, Em, Am, Bm, and Dm. Yes? OK, Here’s my first question then… Say I’m going to back up a whistle playing a jig. Is there one fixed pattern of chords that will work with that particular jig(are the chords fixed?) or is it open to interpretation within that chord group? I have messed around quietly in somes sessions and it seems to me that some chord combinations (within that group) that definitely DONT work but that there are VARIOUS simultaneous chord combitions/changes for that given tune that DO work. If we take say a jig in a given key… Is it open to interpretation for the DADGAD strummer or should the guitarist always be playing the same chords for that song?

2. The drone. I keep reading about this drone. Where is the drone supposed to be centered around? The bass strings or the ‘trebel’ strings or is it just a general thing that you get from that tuning?

3. Next, chord prioritising: Which chord shapes should one start with? I printed out THE DADGAD GUITARIST CHORD CHART from the ‘world wide web’. The problem is that it consist s of nearly 500 chords and I have no idea where to start.I don’t assume for a second that every ok session player has a repertoire of 500 chords that they regularly rotate around. IAnd I want to get going NOW 🙂 So which G are they playing most? Which D are they normally playing? Which A is best?..etc…

4. Question 3 relates to my ‘drone’ question? If you want to let a certain string or strings ring out, the chord pattern must allow this?

4. What does the term ‘modal chords’ in folk guitar playing mean? Are all chords in DADGAD modal?

If anyone can help me solve these mysteries you would make me an extremely, extremely happy man.

Yours eagerly!

GJ

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I would suggest that if you want to accompany tunes that you need to study the chord progression possibilities of each individual tune. I don’t play DADGAD but I once had to play guitar as a replacement for Randall Bays who does use DADGAD, and gained a great deal of inspiration and knowledge by taking the time to study his back up to about 12 sets of tunes for use in a series of concerts. There was certainly nothing in the way of "patterns" but heaps of "ideas". The experience certainly enhanced my appreciation of guitar accompaniment for Irish music.
The word "modal" is often used to vaguely describe a tune not in a major key. Apart from major the other 3 modes used in Irish music are Dorian, Mixolydian, and Aeolian( or Natural Minor). Whilst it is true that for example in a tune written in an A Dorian Mode that the main chords mostly used will be Aminor and G you’d still need to study the tune and learn where the changes are. The idea of patterns exists only in the most superficial sense of the word.
In my own personal circumstance, when I was starting out learning accompaniment to tunes I listened a lot to piano accompaniment, my favourite being the recordings of Shaskeen. Anything with Alec Finn(bouzouki) is also worthwhile. For DADGAD Randall Bays work on some of Martin Hayes recordings is essential. But definitely work on each tune individually.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Take a look at a book by Chris Smith entitled Celtic Back-Up for all Instrumentalists. It may answer a lot of your questions. Good luck!

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

It seems to me that the word ‘modal’ is often used to mean a chord voiced without a third so that it could be either major or minor.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Traditional tunes are not ‘written in keys’. It often or even usually happens that a tune fits in with what you consider to be ‘the right key’; but that is a coincidence arising from the nature of music. The notion of keys, and of chord progressions and related chords will help, but what will help most is listening — to yourself and to the tune — and discovering for yourself what fits and what doesn’t. Too many guitarists hear what they believe should be there, and play what the think should be the ‘right chord’, thereby riding roughshod over the melody and testing the patience of the player.
The ‘drone’ is usually but not always the tonal centre of the tune. The tonal centre may change more than once during the tune, so again, you have to listen, and you have to decide whether to change with it.
Modal means in a mode, that’s all. No mystery, Google it.
There are no short cuts, and it is very easy to make a mess, as you will discover by searching though some of the old threads here. If you are, as you say, desperate, you will not get far. Relax, listen, experiment, practise, remember, research, and above all, enjoy.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

A chart of 500 chords sounds good. Use them all! The reason most people use DADGAD (and the reason most other musicians dislike DADGAD) is that they think you can accompany anything with three chords and a capo.

If it’s any help, the way I go about building accompaniment on mandolin or mandola (and the same approach will probably work on guitar) is to start by playing the melody, then bring in a harmony on the next string down. Once you’ve nailed two strings that will usually suggest which chord shapes to use to cover the rest.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Hi, to answer your questions:
1. It is open to interpretation, to certain limits. There are some ‘basic’ patterns to accompany tunes, but by no means they apply to every tune. They just may apply to large portion of. The most common pattern is I - IV - V, in which you play I for two bars, IV in the third bar and V in the fourth bar (so, if you accompany a tune in D major, you will play D - G - A. This is just a crutch, and be sure that once you start following this indiscriminately you will mess up the accompaniament. Many tunes do not follow the classical modality, or - to classically trained ear - change modality on the go. Your accompaniament should leave pattern-playing as soon as possible, and illustrate the tune. This does not mean that good accompaniament means using plenty of chords. For many tunes, it’s enough to play base chord through the whole part, if you know how to make things interesting with your strumming.

2. The drone is centred around the base note of the tune, but don’t rely on it too strongly (especially that tunes may also have different parts in different keys). So it’s D for Dmaj/min etc., A for Amaj/min etc. The much overused advantage of DADGAD is that the open 6th string provides a strong D drone, and D is the most common key in Irish music.

3. Start with the following chords: (presented below in DADGAD pattern, i.e. from the 6th string to 1st):
D: 050200, 000200
G: 553000
A: 775x00
B: 0133000

Movable chord open: 505050 (try moving it up and down the neck to find out where it works, slightly muting out the other strings with the pads of your fingers)
Movable chord major: 505450
Movable minor chord: 505350
These are for a starter. They may not all ring clear, but are easy to grasp and you may mute or un-stress the strings that make a mess. As I said this is just for the take-off.


4. In a way, yes.

4a. Modal chords in guitar lingo is a somewhat inappropriate term for open chords or power chords, which means chords without a third, therefore lacking modality. DADGAD is a tuning like any other - you can play all kinds of chords there, it’s just power chords are rather easy to play in this tuning. Eg. if you play 000200 (from 6th to 1st string), you’ll have DADAAD, a ‘modal’ D, which you can apply to major, minor, myxolydian and dorian tunes alike. However, if you want to explore this tuning further than mindless bashing out of power chords, you’ll find it may be different from the standard tuning, but it also allows for versatility. Search for the music of Pierre Bensusan and Gilles le Bigot. Jacques Pellen plays jazz in this tuning, and Bernard Bizien plays swing.

Meanwhile, learn playing tunes, read the book by Chris Smith as mentioned by strayaway child and have a glimpse at AlBrown’s introduction to accompanying Irish traditional music, which you will find in his profile on this website.

Do not rely on free tutorial videos from youtube, they are quite often made by wannabes who do not have a clue. If you have no teacher around, I suggest watching videos of good players, getting a teacher via Skype or other online means.

A few discussions ago there was the "Kevin Burke and Micheal O’Domhnaill alert" - find the discussion and use the videos from this channel as a tutorial. Micheal plays in a minimalist and very elegant way, easy to work out - and if you follow this manner of backing, you should be mostly on the safe side.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I would learn to listen first, to both the music in all it’s forms and especially when you playing with others.

I for one don’t think it either necessary or particularly helpful to learn to play the melody before one starts the process of learning to accompany. Far better to start listening and experimenting by playing along to both recordings and like minded friends.

Sit those like minded friends down, ply with drink or tea etc and work out basic accompaniments that you all agree fits the bill.

The best way to learn is to do!

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Forget DADGAD it’s a sham and cop out for the posers and the ignorant. Learn to play in conventional tuning and adapt what you learn, if you must, into other tunings. Learn basic stuff on the keyboard. This is more directly graphic as to which note goes in which chord and how they interact. Learning ‘chord shapes’ on a fretboard is far too abstract for anyone to really learn what is happening. And DADGAD is a further step away. Ask any DADGAD player what he/ she is actually playing and 99% will not know. They are just bunging shapes together.
There is no such thing as ‘modal chords’. The dyad commonly referred to as ‘the power chord’ i.e. root and prefect fifth, is not a chord. Chords is chords, three or more notes in combination. These notes may derive from any scale, modal or diatonic or randomly from any of the twelve semitones available to us in the modern tempered Western system. (They could also be from the untempered scheme and/ or quarter tones et cetera…but foe now!) As I said earlier, learning ‘chords’ i.e. harmony from a keyboard point of view shows this better.
So often in music in the last 70 years six string devil botherers take the easiest approach to playing e.g. BLooZ bothering, blithely learning chord shapes without any idea of what notes are in them or any basic grasp of harmony theory.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Another point — just because a guitar has strings doesn’t mean you have to play them all, all of the time. All the guitarists I have ever played with — and that’s a lot — find it difficult to grasp this fact.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

a lot of the posters are missing a point , one of the points of dadgad are the sympathetic ringing of strings.

what dadgad and other tunings such as orkney tuning offer apart from sympathetic ringing of strings is the abilty to use chords and dyads that use no third, this is possible in standard tuning but your options are by comparison limited.
Yaalhouse there are such things as modal chords, an example might be a d modal 7, dadacd, or a modal 9.dadaed.
DADGAD does also have limitations, it is not very easy to modulate [change key] easily.
the best exponent of dadgad is pierre bensusan, who is a virtuoso in this tuning and who has a book available.
I agree withYaalhouse it is important to know what you are doing, another option for you might be drop d check out.arty mcglynn
or dadeae check out paul de grae, according to Martin Carthy, and he told me this personally, is that you are more flexible in dadeae for modulation than in dadgad, although the best tuning for being able to change key is standard followed closely by drop d

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Dick Miles: NONSENSE! Your so called ‘d modal 7’ and I suppose you mean ‘spelt dadacd’ is conventionally known as D 7th no third (D7no 3rd). The chord spelt ‘dadaed’ is conventionally known as ‘D suspend 9th’ (a different inversion would be ‘D suspended 2nd’. ‘Suspension’ implies the third of the chord id moved up or down a degree i.e. you have sus4 and sus 2 (although as I said the second is very often an octave up so is sus9).

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

dadgad is not a sham, it has its uses and there are some fine exponents of it.
although imo it is not the be all.
To advise people to play solely in standard tuning, is rather like advising a 5 string banjo player to never use anything but gdgbd, it is limiting.
in my opinion it is good to experiment and to be able to use other tunings that uses sympathetic ringing as well as using standard.
some players like double drop d, some dadgad some orkney tuning and others like dadeae.
using solely standard has disadvantages, although it does have one advantage, the ability to change key easily.
dadeae is better in this respect than dadgad .

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Everyone to his own, but I use DADGAE a lot when I play guitar. I play mandolin and bouzouki, mostly, and I find it falls under my fingers pretty easy and allows lots of inversions.

Keep things simple as you build up an understanding and pay close attention to the good guys

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

There’s a trick to DADGAD, too. The ADG strings are the same as conventional tuning, so you can play diatonic 3rds, 6ths, triad voicings, basically anything you would in standard tuning there in the middle of the guitar because its all the same notes.

actually, if you play more like a mandolin or bouzouki player, it works out pretty good….small two note or three note chords with some drones where you can. Work more with the rhythm and pulse and go up and down the neck more than you would in standard tuning. All those As and Ds, you know

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

As Dick says, DADGAD and relatives do let you have more ringing strings, hence more power. This is not always a good thing. A DADGADder can be overpowering in a session. I know one singer who uses it exclusively, since it matches his voice - which has all the subtlety of a bull elephant in heat. Standard tuning forces you to damp more strings, which may sound monotonous but at least leaves some air for the melody to breathe.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

The first thing to do is put down your guitar and listen to lots and lots of good traditional Irish music. Listen in sessions, listen to CDs, wherever you can find good music. You need to do this a LOT.

Then, when you know how the tunes go and how the rhythms of Irish music feel and sound, you can start thinking about backing it on guitar. You can’t back the tunes if you don’t know how they go. (And they are tunes, not songs. They don’t have lyrics, generally speaking.)

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

If you want to follow up on what T O’R had to say, you can take a lesson or three with Mr. Bays:

http://randalbays.com/lessons.html

(This refers to fiddle lessons, but I’m fairly certain he’d do guitar with you. He’s such a pleasant agreeable fellow!)

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

yhaalhouse "Forget DADGAD it’s a sham and cop out for the posers and the ignorant"

An extreme view, perhaps, but DAGAD certainly has something of "The Emperor’s New Clothes" about it in that no-one dare criticise it.

Only yhaalhouse has the courage to do so, it seems …

Yes, a far better approach would be to stick to standard tuning, and take the time to learn about the modes, gapped scales etc that occur in Irish music, and the chords needed for those modes. Yes, and also learn the tunes.

It’s not necessary to know 500 chords, either. The chords listed below are adequate to provide suitable accompaniment for most tunes which occur in western tradtional music (including Irish music), if used correctly.

Major Chords
——————————-

AMaj BMaj CMaj DMaj EMaj FMaj GMaj


Minor Chords
——————————

Amin Bmin Dmin Emin F#min Gmin


Seventh Chords (rarely needed)
————————————-

A7 B7 C7 D7 E7 G7

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Glossary entry in Barry Foy’s little book "Field Guide to the Irish Music Session":

"DADGAD

Pronounced "dadgad," a tuning for the guitar, which was a major advance over the old standard tuning which required the guitarist to listen to the music he was accompanying."

General backing advice…

Absolutely! No-one needs 500 chords.
And what you especially never ever ever want is F (or, indeed, Fmaj7 Mr Gill!) when a tune is in Ador. Likewise C or Cmaj7 in Edor. These flat VI’s may work in Aoelian modes but tunes in that mode are rare.
In major tunes use I, ii, IV, V
In Mixolydian tunes: I, flat VII, maybe IV or v (never V)
In Dorian: i, flat vii, maybe IV
Try and play root/ fifth dyads as often as possible, never use extended or altered chords.
Bash away at a root drone every now and then.
Remember a lot of tunes don’t neccesarily start on the I chord- just beacause the fiddle player says it’s in D doesn’t mean it starts on a D chord, it is just as likely to start on the ii chord (Em). This is more common than is often realised.
If you listen to the tune you’ll hear where the cadences are. This precisely where the ‘chord’ changes are.
It really is very simple in theory and tantalizingly tricky in reality.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

…and just beacause the fiddle player says it’s in D doesn’t mean it’s in D 🙂

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

if you intend to play in DADGAD, my advice is to contact AND listen to Pierre Bensusan.
Mixolydian, I am critical of DADGAD, but I am not prepared to take seriously provacative statements about it being a sham.
the truth is that every tuning is good if the musician knows how to play,and how to accompany, at the same time no tuning is without certain limitations.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

the style of your questions seems to suggest that you are fairly new to traditional music.

It’s great to see someone taking so much interest and seeking advice.

Just a word of caution - don’t expect every melody player to welcome or appreciate your contribution to his or her tune, however good an accompanist you ultimately become.

For some players, the music is seen as being entirely melodic and they might consider the introduction of a chording instrument such as the guitar to their session to be inappropriate.

If you have a particular session in mind to visit, and if you don’t know whether it’s guitar-friendly, it might be worth checking before making your debut.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Are you sure, are you ABSOLUTELY SURE, that you’re not a troll ?
It’s just that you’ve stirred up a hornets’ nest here, yhaalhouse and Dick Miles and others locking horns.
I’m not a fan of DADGAD anymore, I had some fun with it making song accompaniments 45 years ago, but I’ve grown out of it mainly. Certainly can’t be bothered with it for ITM accompaniment, well I never take my guitar to a session any more, prefer the ‘zouk as it’s better for the playing of tunes too, in GDAE of course.
But to answer the question; you already have some of the skills for the task you have set yourself, ie to be a proficient accompanying guitarist; take what you already know and use you ears, as they are the essential piece of your equipment. Forget about DADGAD, it’s for phonies and show-offs. Learn to find the root of a tune ( the number of sharps or flats on the manuscript does NOT always indicate the key ), learn to hear the changes. You will not get it all right at first; by no means. Persevere, practise, don’t give up. Do you know how to get to the Albert Hall ? Practise, kid, practise.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Wow! Thanks for the time put into replying. Lots of fantastic stuff to be getting my teeth into. I had a sneaky peak (through Amazon’s Look Inside) at Chris Smith’s book this evening and will get that ordered. I think it could help a lot. I’m also going to make up a playlist of all of the mentioned artists. I’m not ruling out taking lessons but I don’t hae the money to take them more than one in a while.

Millionyears_bc: I’m fairly new to traditional music but not completely. For about a year I’ve attended a session once a week though this consists of about 65 per cent song, 20 per cent tunes and the rest is beer-drinking. I observed the session the first months and have then gone on to play a bit in open E but I was totally blind for a while as I didn’t know any of the tunes. I feel like I’ve developed a bit of intuition through copying other ‘functioning’ (but not great) players at this session but I want go beyond ‘ok’ and ‘copying’ and be able to spontaneously back up melodies creatively on my own. I don’t have the need to dig deeper into theory than is necessary.

With regards to being welcome at a session: Yeah, this is something I’ve become aware of and is also one of the reasons I want to be decent-if and when I get the chance to play. I’ve seen the looks those fiddle players draw some guitarists and I don’t think my fragile ego can handle the likes. Luckily for guitarists, the rules of the session I attend are clear and melody-purists are in the minority.

Dave L35: I suspect that there’s some sort of osmosis in this game- at least it helps to know the tunes- and I always note down the names of tunes and go around drilling my brain with them on my mp3 player. The thing is that through listening more and more to the likes of say The Bothy Band, I just seem to get more and more frustrated. I love the music(It’s exactly that type of strumming-DADGAD-chords-dancing-around-the fretboard that I’m aiming for) but the ‘chords’(not sure if I’m allowed to call them chords anymore after reading the thread) seem difficult to pick out and more often than not go in the least expected direction when I least expect it.. if you will.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Guernsey Pete: Hahaha!

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

gingerbreadjuan,
I have tried to answer a lot of the questions you posed with an article included in my profile, just click on my user name to see it. It is far from complete, but it does give you a lot of basic information that can help you get off to a good start. I gleaned the information from a lot of good players over the years, and felt that it was better to teach budding accompanists to be better rather than criticise.
And Chris Smith is a member of this site, just search for the user name "coyotebanjo." In his profile, he has links to a lot of information he has posted on the web, which will give you a preview of what you will see in his book and the accompanying CD. I can’t recommend his material enough—if you do every exercise he proposes, you will easily reach that ‘bloody decent’ level you aspire to. And it gives you tunes played without accompaniment, so you can experiment with different approaches, without imposing yourself on friends who would not be as patient as the CD will be when you have it play those tunes over and over again.
Like many have said, don’t feel you need to change your tuning to become a good accompanist of The Music. There are lots and lots of people who do very fine work in standard tuning,
Best of luck in your musical endeavors! Enjoy!

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Al’s information is a great place to start, gingerbreadjuan. It will answer a lot of your questions.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Why DAGDAD ? Ok, some say we don’t belong in trad with our guitars (apparently there are no keys and no chords in trad, guitarist just don’t "get" trad blah blah blah…), but I find EADGBE more versatile

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

You can spot the players who do both standard and DADGAD by the 3 or more Scruggs pegs they have 🙂

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Ahem! You could always try baritone ukulele: DGBE (best of both worlds!). plus: smaller lump of wood to cart around, less obtrusive sound (gut or nylon strings), harp like quality, D drone at bottom, looks, plays and sounds exactly like a quality Vulcan arse flute…

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Depends on whats being played after the tune your in as to whether DADGAD or Standard is best, certainly standard covers all bases where as DADGAD is capo intensive for almost everybody, exceptions would be guys like Iain Strachan up in Dornoch; who can navigate off the cuff backing during a session without resorting to the use of a capo and give a good account of himself in doing so.

For me thats the nub of it in a dynamic session situation, playing without ferkin around with the capo in situations where to do so would break the moment………… If you can do it in DADGAD then fair play, if not use standard for sessions and DADGAD for rehearsed stuff, where you can arrange the music to suit the capo movements for the key changes.

Chords; learn to spell them and then construct them from where ever you happen to be on the instrument. Learn a movable major chord and it’s inversions, learn what notes are contained there in and what happens when you sharpen or flatten the individual notes, when you can adjust these chords, learn to move these adjustable shapes, movable major chords, through all 12 keys, now you know almost all the chords, extended chords; just add more and once you learn to spell chords, you’ll know which notes to add to make whichever chord your needing to find.

Once you have that sorted, takes a lot less time than one may think, you could learn 4 note movable major + inversions across the three sets of 4 strings possible on a 6 string, once you know that you’ve got the finger board wired.

gam makes an interesting point in his post above when he mentions not playing all 6 strings at once, good advice…..

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Use whatever tuning you like. I largely play in DADGAD and find it suits me. Others, Ian Carr for example (!) play in standard tuning and get it to sound great. Each tuning will have its strengths and weaknesses. Learn to use them for your advantage.

I have only skim read some of this thread so someone may have mentioned it already but your chords for the key of G are wrong. The scale would be:

G Am Bm C D Em F#dim G

You would never come across an F chord or a Dm chord in the key of G major. If they are featuring in a tune that is nominally in G then there will be accidental notes involved.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I don’t think DADGAD is a sham. But I see what yhaalhouse is getting at. Like most non-standard open tunings you can use more open strings and get a nice drone/ring from it. I find it great for solo playing of irish music, because you can have a the drone going and some harmony from open strings whilst playing a melody line.

But as accompaniment I find it a bit limited compared to standard or Drop D tuning. Maybe just because I don’t know DADGAD as well, but also I suspect because it is not as versatile due to too many similar strings with not much interval between them so the variety of chord shapes that can be easily reached is less.

Plus it’s annoying when a tune suddenly changes key and it requires a movement of the capo… you can get those rolling capos, but still it’s a hassle.

Totally agree with gam’s point about not playing all the strings on the guitar. This is even more important in DADGAD.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

By the way, GJ, it sounds like you’re going a bit over the top on the theory side of things, rather than just listening/playing and figuring out what sounds good.

I’ve tried using chord charts (in particular for jazz piano) but I’ve never found them very helpful. When I try and make music using a chord chart, it feels like I’m reading a dictionary to try and write a poem.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Please don’t take too much notice of some of the extreme and highly opinionated advice here! (Well, unless it has entertained you!) Go with DADGAD if that suits you: good players find it as flexible as standard tuning. Listen to Tony McManus play ‘Goodbye Pork Pie Hat’ as well as loads of Irish stuff.

On the other hand, lots of us find DADGAD brilliant for fingerstyle arrangements of Irish tunes but standard or dropped D better for mixing flatpicking and accompanying tunes with reasonable volume in sessions.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

G_breadjuan

with respect, what you probably need to do is to go and listen to some really good traditional melody players and try to work out how they manage to do what they’re doing, then, when you begin understand it a little, start thinking creatively about accompaniment

drinking beer and listening to songs or tunes played "ok" won’t set you any proper targets

I know because that’s exactly what I did for the first few years of my involvement with the music, and I bitterly regret the waste of time

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

This is a clear case of something I’ve mentioned before. Guitar players are, without exception, more interested in the guitar itself than with music.

"I’m desperately looking for some guidance in making the transition into being a session guitarist"

"I want to be a functioning (and later bloody decent)session player and having watched some folk guitarists in sessions, I have no doubt that my fingers are mechanically capable of doing what they have to do"

"Which chord shapes should one start with?"

Guitar guitar guitar guitar guitar.

"It’s exactly that type of strumming-DADGAD-chords-dancing-around-the fretboard that I’m aiming for"

Guitar guitar guitar guitar guitar.





Not once has he mentioned the tunes. Not once.

Oh no … hang on … he did mention the tunes once:

"Luckily for guitarists, the rules of the session I attend are clear and melody-purists are in the minority."

Say it all.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Ah, the Gillmonster has been itching these last few days to make yet more of his measured comments. Incredible to think, Michael, that you have met and assessed the attitude of every single guitar player in the world and that they are all more interested in the guitar than music. Yup, Paco de Lucia, Barney Kessel, Segovia - they’re all the same.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

A true story: The guitarist and drummer want to play Drowsy Maggie. But their usual mandolin player isn’t there, and the fiddler who is sitting in hasn’t played Drowsy Maggie in such a long time, he can’t remember how to start it.

"It starts like this," says the drummer, and plays "Thumpety thumpety thump" on his drum.

"That’s right," says the guitarist, and he plays "Strummety strummety strum" on his guitar.

But none of this has any notes of the tune, and there’s no recording handy to jog the fiddler’s memory, so the tune does not get played.

The bottom line: If you don’t know the tune, you’re not playing The Music (i.e., the sort of music that this site is all about). It might be nice, your DADGAD dancing, but it isn’t the same thing, and anybody who thinks so is mistaken. That’s the point our resident curmugeon is really trying to make, I think.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

To be fair, The Jeremy man himself says

"The exchange of tunes is what keeps traditional Irish music alive. This website is one way of passing on jigs, reels and other dance tunes.

Some of the tunes are well known, and some are more obscure. It’s this mixture of the familiar and the new that makes for a good session."

We can disagree about the usefulness of this website for the above but the emphasis is always on *TUNES*.

Of course, not all guitarists are the same but I’ve also noticed that their main interest is in how they can interpret the music for their own instrument. They may have a very wide knowledge and extremely good taste but it’s their instrument and technique which comes first.

I’ve been to several guitar concerts and a typical performance will often include a collection of "pieces" covering a variety of genres, eg classical, "folk", baroque, own composition etc just to demonstrate what he(she) and the instrument can do. It can still(and should be) very enjoyable and entertaining but the focus is still on the instrument rather than the music.

Having said all that, there are exponents of other instruments who do the same thing but it does seem to be more prevalent with guitarists.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

How to test your accompanist:

Stop playing the melody.

If you can still hear a ghost of the tune in what the accompanist is doing, he/she is worth having. If all you get is blocks of I IV V first position chords, then tactfully suggest that he/she should leave and join a pop band.

No fiddler/whistler/box play would try to join in with a tune they’ve never heard before, and I’ve never understood why guitarists think they can.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Segovia was one of the worst offenders.

I remember when I was a kid liking a popular little tune he played on one of my dad’s records, a tune simply called Tango, by Albéniz.

I always thought it was a guitar tune. But then one day I heard it on the piano. Wow.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Skreech, you will understand it when you realise that guitarists are really just percussionists

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

… as are pianists.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

of course

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I agree with mr Gill. The six string botherers (of which I am one remember) do love the instruments more than the music. They are the least schooled of all players. Generally they can play a few chords and noodle a bit of pentatonic doodlepoodle. Some are quite lyrical at it like the better BLooZ and jazz tormentors. But most can’t play a tune, any tune! Most have the minimal of music theory (this is why something as boil-in-the-bag as DADGAD is so appealing!).
They all know all the different makes and types though; and the amps and what the FX pedals do. Shame really!

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

But speaking as a BACKER. You can accompany without being able to either play or whistle the tune. Good backing is all extemporized on the spot. You have to be well versed in the genre and have the ‘accent’ or ‘dialect’ right but that is how it works. I rarely play the same backing to the same tune twice. But I play appropriately. It is old fashioned busking. ‘Busking’ as in vamping and comping away, not ‘busking’ as in standing at the bottom of the escalator at Tooting Broadway tube station playing The Birdy Song with your Vulcan arse flute case stretegically left open on the floor.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

But speaking as a BACKER. You can accompany without being able to either play or whistle the tune."
I disagree, I think it is better if the backer is familiar with the tune, certain tunes like the heather Breeze, have very simple chord progressions, that are obvious, but there are some tunes that have complicated and unexpected chords.quite frankly if a guitarist has never heard the tune before they should not join in.
The melody players do not need a guitarist who is playing wrong chords because he is unfamiliar with a tune, this may not apply to you, yaalhouse you may be briiliant at picking up unfamiliar tunes, but in my experience it is frequently a problem.
as a general rule guitarists should not join in unless they know the tune, knowing the tune means being familiar with it, in fact i would advise giutarists to practise at home singing the tunes while they accompany , if there are no melody players to practise with in private

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

‘I disagree, I think it is better if the backer is familiar with the tune, certain tunes like the heather Breeze, have very simple chord progressions, that are obvious, but there are some tunes that have complicated and unexpected chords.quite frankly if a guitarist has never heard the tune before they should not join in.’

No tunes ‘have very simple chord progressions’ or even ‘complicated and unexpected chords’. That’s a complete misperception of this music.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

"But speaking as a BACKER. You can accompany without being able to either play or whistle the tune. "

No you can’t. You can do it in jazz or rock and some other genres, where the backers are simply providing a rhythmic foundation for the soloist to noodle over the top of. But you can’t do it with trad music any more than you could do it with a classical concerto. If you don’t know the tune, the best you can hope for is to find some chords that don’t clash with it too often. And that really doesn’t add anything to the music.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

No tunes "have chords", period. A tune is a melody, that’s it. Arrangements (can) have chords, though. But one particular arrangement of a tune is not "the tune," even if a lot of people think so.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Scutcher, I disagree .
The Heather Breeze, has large sections of the tunes based on arpeggios, the chords are blatantly obvious, arpeggios being broken chords, Rolling in The Ryegrass falls into the same category.
If you think that is a misconception, I say you are wrong.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

If you’re hearing or seeing arpeggios in the music, then you’re approaching it from completely the wrong direction.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Really, perhaps you could explain why?.
Arpeggios are only a series of intervals, listening and recognising notes when you hear them, is what this music is all about, whether they be arpeggios, or any other intervals.
For guitarists who wish to play chords, being able to recognise the correct key is important, that is about listening, being able to hear where a tune is going, and recognising intervals whatever they are is important, tunes are notes made up of different intervals, if they cannot do this they should not try to accompany, they should go away and familiarise themselves with the tune before they cause mayhem.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Yes. the tunes don’t "have" chords. Sure, you can play chords with them, but the distinction between the two is absolutely vital.

Yes, some tunes have runs in them that are common chord triads, but to make the extension of suggesting that "the" chord that is that triad is, therefor, "the" chord for that bit of the tune is indeed a misunderstanding of the genre.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

My advice is listen with your ears, and experiement with different chord shapes. I play in standard tuning, and have become a reasonably proficient backer.

It’s been a process of trail and error. First, figuring out keys, then finding the right chords, then messing with the chords to get the best fit with the melody.

You don’t have to strum whole chords, 2 or 3 strings are often better, but the fact is, it’s all in the right hand anyway. It’s knowing when not to play a chord, leaving space for the melody is another good habit to cultivate.

This is not to say the DADGAD is not a good tuning to use, but it’s not a panacea. I’ve found that DADGAD is better for, maybe 10-15 % of tunes.

Just my opinion.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

[*This is a clear case of something I’ve mentioned before. Guitar players are, without exception, more interested in the guitar itself than with music.
*]

That’s a strange perspective. Would that apply to serious players of other instruments, eg violin or viola, or anything else, iyo?

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Oddly Jim, for some reason, the "without exception" rule only applies to guitar players. However, there are players of other instruments who are more interested in their instrument than music itself … as you yourself, of course, are well aware.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

[*Oddly Jim, for some reason, the "without exception" rule only applies to guitar players. However, there are players of other instruments who are more interested in their instrument than music itself … as you yourself, of course, are well aware.*]

Well, it could be argued that if you loved music enough, you would truly love it by listening alone, without the need to even play an instrument. Want to know what I do when I walk into an great-sounding session? I sit down and beer, and listen. Don’t even take out my fiddle. Yes, beer is a verb in my world.

Anyway, your reply is fair comment .. but the subject for another thread, maybe .. it might de-rail this one 🙂

I’ve heard good guitar accomp. coming from both DADGAD and standard / dropped D tuning players. I think that comes from, at the very least, a good knowledge of the music, although I think knowing the tune’s structure is enough .. not necessary to "know" it, as it be able to whistle it.

DADGAD has a superb open ringy sound, but if I had to choose only one tuning for every diddley tune, it would be dropped D.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Mmm, Tommy Tedesco got an awful lot of work being more interested in the guitar than with music. Can’t understand why all the Hollywood studios felt he was the number one call for thirty years. Maybe it was his superior reading skills and just maybe it had something to do with making good music.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Oh, I see it is time for, "lets set up a negative stereotype of accompanists, and then imply that every accompanist fits the stereotype."
Boring…

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Yes, some tunes have runs in them that are common chord triads, but to make the extension of suggesting that "the" chord that is that triad is, therefor, "the" chord for that bit of the tune is indeed a misunderstanding of the genre
no you are wrong, if you are playing, the first bar of rolling in the ryegrass, and the tune goes af#df#, that is an arpeggio of d major and is harmonised with a d major chord or a d power chord, if you harmonise it with anything else it is incorrect, whatever you might SAY about genres, it is incorrect to harmonise it with anything else but a d major chord or a d power chord which has no major or minor third.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

" it is incorrect to harmonise it with anything else but a d major chord"

I didn’t expect you to understand.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Al, I wasn’t setting up a negative stereotype of accompanists. I was talking about guitar players.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Doesn’t matter, Michael. It’s still an idiotic thing to claim.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Try to fit Tommy Tedesco into your stereotype if you can.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Never heard of him, I’m afraid. Which sessions does he go to ?

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

It is difficult to understand statements that are nonsensical.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Kenny, you may never have heard of him but you will certainly have heard him if you ever saw any American film or TV show between 1960 and 1990. I don’t suppose he ever played at any "sessions" but then Michael wasn’t just referring to "session" guitar players. He included all guitar players.
His universal statement could not possibly be verified. It would be like saying that all fiddle players no nothing about harmony when, in fact the figure is only 97%.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Wasn’t Tedesco a session musician?

I believe he even sessioned for Elvis. Zappa and Sinatra, too.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

He worked for just about everyone who was anyone. He was not just the guitar players’ guitar player but the musicians’ musician. He was the number one session player for thirty years or so - but not the sort of sessions people on the mustard board mean.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

"but not the sort of sessions people on the mustard board mean."

Nope, but you can have fun with the wordplay.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

"and the tune goes af#df#, that is an arpeggio of d major and is harmonised with a d major chord or a d power chord, if you harmonise it with anything else it is incorrect."

You’re right, but oh so wrong. There is nothing that says you have to accompany that phrase with A chord. How many different Dmaj chords do you know?

The sensible way to do it would be to use a partial D chord on the A, D and G strings, and use your pinky to play the F#s on the D string. You’re still only using D maj chords, but you’re playing an accompaniment rather than just blattering blocks of chords. But to do that you have to think ahead, which means you have to know the tune.

I have to say, this thread illustrates perfectly why I’m getting dissillusioned with open sessions. A group of musicians get to gether, listen to each other, go away to learn and practice the tunes at home so that they can play together in future. Then the guitarists turn up, fresh from playing pub-rock or whatever they do for the rest of the week, and think they can busk over tunes they have never heard before.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I should say that otherwise I agree with most of what Michael says here. There is no magic formula - it’s all about the ears. (To quote Mr Tedesco, " Many people hear music with their eyes instead of their ears").
As a guitar player I much prefer playing tunes than accompanying them.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Although, of course, Michael will tell me that you can’t play the tunes on a guitar.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

You’re right, but oh so wrong. There is nothing that says you have to accompany that phrase with A chord. How many different Dmaj chords do you know?"
read all my posts.
i said you can accompany it with a d major chord or a d power chord [root and 5]
how many d major chords do i know?
3 different inversions in standard tuning, but what has that to do with it? that sequence of notes is harmonised correctly with a d major or d power[no third] chord, if some berk plays e major, it sounds wrong, which is why guitarists[imo] should not play unless they are familiar with the tune

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

"that sequence of notes is harmonised correctly with a d major or d power[no third] chord, if some berk plays e major, it sounds wrong"

And if some berk just strums a Dmaj or D power chord through it it can sound just as wrong.

I agree that guitarists need to know the tune, but that includes far more than just knowing which chords ‘fit’.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I agree that guitarists need to know the tune, but that includes far more than just knowing which chords ‘fit’."
did i ever say that knowing the chords was sufficient, if you read all my posts and all my comments on this subject in other threads, you will notice that I suggest being familiar with the tune is important.
however knowing which chords fit is a good starting point, next , listening carefuly to how a melody player is playing, mechanical strumming is not good enough.
Quite frankly, guitarists as accompanists are not necessary, if however the accompanist is good[ and there is only one in my area who comes in to this category for all tempos ]then the accompanist CAN LIFT THE MUSIC
.but unfortunately they are not common

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I neglected to mention in my prior post on this thread, that I had a rock and roll background (lead guitar) prior to playing Irish/Celtic music.

Learning the melodies helps in finding the proper chord shapes, or the 2 or 3 notes to use, when accompanying a tune. Guitar players that don’t bother to learn the melodies cannot, in my opinion be good accompanyists.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

‘Quite frankly, guitarists as accompanists are not necessary, if however the accompanist is good[ and there is only one in my area who comes in to this category for all tempos ]then the accompanist CAN LIFT THE MUSIC.’

Accompanists can never ‘lift the music’!

You really don’t get it, do you?

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Scutcher. I get it alright, in my opinion it is you that does not get it. Accompanists [imo] can lift the music.

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

The music is the melody. How can accompanists ever ‘lift’ the melody?

Posted by .

When lift is urgently needed!!!!!

Not directly, no, but if the melody players are not providing the lift an accompanists may lift the melody players; indirectly lifting the melody.

Posted by .

Finding the lift

C’mon Scutch I posted that thread a month ago on a now deleted thread & pointed out Llig’s comments including this,

"I take lift to be more specific to the individual tunes themselves. How does the tune turn? Where does the line play through the bar lines? Where does the line interrupt. And, of course, how can you personally nudge the tune into playing through bar lines and pause it in interesting percussive places? I’m being quite specific here. My take on it is that while you can make "the music" swing, it’s "the tunes" that you can give lift to."

I repeat ~ No, an accompanist cannot directly lift the melody.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

So please explain how an accompanist can do it indirectly.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

@ Dick Miles.

On the basis of your last post I don’t have any argument with you at all. My arguement is with those who have posted here suggesting that it is unnecessary for a guitarist to know or be able to whistle the tune in order to accompany it, that simply knowing which chords ‘fit’ particular keys is sufficient to let them strum along.

End of all discourse urgently needed!!!!!

Did you read the OP?

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

"Al, I wasn’t setting up a negative stereotype of accompanists. I was talking about guitar players."
I literally laughed out loud at that one… 😉

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

glad to be of service

Posted .

Re:

that was ironic

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

I ain’t fluffed, anyhow.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

The accompanyists can life the tune with rhthym.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Like a tune doesn’t have rhythm. Give me a break & learn some tunes!

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

All the rhythm a tune needs is in the tune already.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

First, thanks again to those who gave me lots of great advice. There’s lots of fantastic and encouraging stuff there especially from the likes of Al Brown.

Unfortunately, a lot of my original enthusiasm has dissipated as a result of some of the post, and the jury’s still out as to whether I’ll bother at all anymore. Maybe I should be provoked by the likes of Michael Gill into been a “bloody good session guitarist” just to spite him? Or should I throw in the towel before I’ve even started and focus on “proper” traditional instrument?

The trouble for me is that provocation and resignation are clearly bad sources of motivation for entering into any kind of learning curve. Is this ‘scene’ (I probably have the terminology wrong there too) really peppered with such elitism and aggression?

Michael Gill: It sounds like you’ve been bottling that up for a while. Interesting that you selectively rip the following out of my post:

“Not once has he mentioned the tunes. Not once.”

Here’s what i actually wrote:

“I was totally blind for a while as I didn’t know any of the TUNES”

“it helps to know the TUNES and I always note down the names of TUNES and go around drilling my brain with them on my mp3 player”

(FYI: I have also started to learn fiddle and the first thing i did, before I had a single lesson, was to email my future tutor about what sort of TUNES I should be listening to. I sought them out and have been listening. Lots. Incidentally, a lot of these are backed up by guitar, a lot in dadgad, and in my opinion it sound bloody good.)

There was an expressed and intended naivety in my post. I’m obviously new to the ‘scene’ and am trying to figure what goes where, not just on the fret board, but in a session. I didn’t try to hide that. The whole point of soliciting more information here was to be pointed in the right direction by those with experience. And of course I’m going to mention the guitar, that’s what the post was about!

In spite of the fact I display respect for session etiquette(I express the importance of “being welcome at a session” before playing, and commented “if and when I get the chance to play”), it seems that “Gillmonster” et al are petrified that I’m gonna turn up at, and feck up, theirs. I understand that too to a certain extent. I just feel that there are more constructive and diplomatic ways of orientating people so that they can discover what they want to play and where they belong.

Re. “Luckily for guitarists, the rules of the session I attend are clear and melody-purists are in the minority”: Yes, even in my acknowledged naivety, I maintain that this is a positive thing. The session in question is mainly a song session with a couple of fiddle players who ****ENJOY**** a bit of both. The ‘melody-purists’ meet another evening to ***ENJOY*** their session without guitarists and I have never even considered taking my guitar along without an invitation because I’m not an idiot.

The problem I have with the ‘hater-ades’ , to borrow a sh*tty, but fitting, expression from across the pond, is that young (or old for that matter) people who realise they want to get into this type of music; who come to the table with bags of enthusiasm, can be dissuaded by a wall of fiddle players who have had their guns cocked waiting to ward us off with the rage built up over sessions where they havent managed to politely let a dodgy guitarist know that they would prefer if he didnt play. Chill out! We new people are interested in learning about session etiquette. Most of us are interested in finding out where we are and aren’t welcome. The majority of us won’t even bring and instrument to a session without asking and I suspect the vast majority of those newbies who do, just need orientated-lots of people dont even know that there are rules. relaz and let us know!!

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

*relax

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

"We new people are interested in learning about session etiquette" - in my experience, this is no longer true, certainly not in Scotland, where "session etiquette" no longer exists.
"The majority of us won’t even bring an instrument to a session without asking……….." - again, not true, in my experience.
If you can play the guitar competently, and especially if you know the tunes, you’ll be very welcome in most sessions - certainly in any session I might be involved in. As you correctly note, the trick is in knowing or recognising which ones you won’t be welcome in, and really, I think they’d be fairly few.

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Agree with Kenny. I think the post "I want to play the guitar in sessions" gets the reaction it does because of all the badly behaved accompanists (guitarists and drummers, really) who see the guitar or bodhran as an "easy" route into session playing. Learn to hit a drum, thrash three chords, and voila, you can join the session without having to spend years learning how to play the melody. I’m not saying this is the OP — from the tone of his posts, I’m sure it isn’t — but I’m just saying that the eager guitar-learner who quietly listens in the back and learns melodies is a somewhat rare beast.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

gingerbreadjuan, Are yo interested in playing this music, or playing the guitar?

Posted .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

My answer to the question asked of gingerbreadjuan is, at a pinch, I think I prefer my wig glues to my hot water bottle collection.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Scotland’s largest guitar can be seen down in Grassmarket which is only a hop, skip, and a jump away from Sandy Bells.

http://www.indymediascotland.org/node/29250

Beware all you melody players. It might just make an appearance some night.

😛

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

Imho Iris Nevins gives some of the best advice I’ve heard by a guitarist for guitarists;

Re: working out the chords
Posted on July 25th 2009 by irisnevins

"Play out the melody on guitar first, doesn’t have to be performance perfect, just get the feel for where the chords should change, figure out that note, and play that as a chord for a few beats. Then move to the next. If you play the melody you ought to be able to hear where things shift. Just keep at it and it will become apparent. Take it tune by tune…. there is no one generic backing formula that works for all the music."
https://thesession.org/discussions/22178#comment460923

Posted by .

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

gingerbreadjuan, Don’t be put off by the negative comments, there is quite a bit of slagging that goes on here. And as far as most are concerned, their bark is worse than their bite. If you go into a session without an instrument at first, and talk to them to see if they will be welcoming, and then arrive with a good attitude, and having put some work into it, you will generally find a good reception. And often, you will find other young folks who, like you, are just starting to learn, and you can learn together. My wife learned fiddle as I learned to accompany her, and some of my favorite musical times were when she and I, as unskilled as we were, played together in our living room.
Hang in there, and enjoy every step of the journey.

Re: DADGAD/session guitar advice urgently needed!!!!!

🙂

Posted by .