Tune of bFlat dilemma!

Tune of bFlat dilemma!

So I was just wondering, what key tune would go best with a tune of bFlat, what do you guys think??

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

Don’t do it, just don’t do it.
Why play in a key that will instantly bar many people in this genre from joining in ?
One might ask what instrument are you playing ? If you’re trying to show off that you’re a consummate musician, well, there you go. You’re also a banker ( was that the right spelling ? )
If this is a concert performance on some strange instrument, the the usual rules apply; F or C.
Of course, all these remarks are strictly my own opinion……

PS you can also write the key as Bb….

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

well depends on the tune if its reel i would go with the key of A and a hornpipe
i would go with the key of G hope this helps

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

It depends entirely on the tunes. If I haven’t heard the first, I can’t suggest another,

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Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

I’m guessing you just bought a Generation whistle in Bb.
That is the only Irish instrument anyone uses to play in Bb.
They can sound pretty good, but nobody will be able to play along.
If you’re going to be playing with just your band, you can change the key of any tune you like.

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

There are players with Bb uilleann pipes, and a lot of Scottish tunes in Bb.

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Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

yes but all the Scottish pipers think they’re in A. (The Scottish Great Highland Bagpipes are written in A Mixolydian but sound in B-flat Mixolydian, that is, written in two sharps but sounding in three flats. Scottish Smallpipes and Borderpipes are usually made in A, and play the tunes as written.)

It would be strange for a Scottish fiddler to learn all the A tunes in Bb, when 99% of the Smallpipes and Borderpipes are in A. Unless he’s playing in a band with a Great Highland Bagpipe, for which the fiddler would usually have a fiddle tuned up a halfstep.

Anyhow, if you’re talking the "sounding keys" on the GHB, they play tunes in Bb Mixolydian, Eb Major, C minor, and more rarely Ab Lydian and F dorian. They freely mix these keys together in medleys, or sometime within the same tune.

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

Answering the original question, an Eb tune would go with th Bb tune, if you follow the custom of a 2-tune set in D / G.

Interesting thing about keys - I picked up my ‘Beauties of the North" fiddle book by Bill Hardie. There are 4 tunes in G, and 7 tunes in Bb.

I think fiddlers often steer clear of playing in Bb for a few reasons. Practical reasons - many fixed-pitch instruments in a session are not suited to the key of Bb. Other reason - Bb is a slightly more difficult key to play in (you ‘lose’ a finger).

Re: Generation whistle in Bb […] is the only Irish instrument anyone uses to play in Bb.

Well, I’m not sure, but I’ve heard rumours of other whistle makers to offer Bb whistles as well… and I may be going out on a limb now, but I think I’ve even heard of some crazy flute maker folks to make piccs in Bb! 😲

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

I don’t expect guitar players would have much of a problem. Capo 1 and play in A. Neither would most mandolin players I know.

Re: Tune of bFlat dilemma!

I would suggest that the main use for a Bb whistle is to accompany a singer in keys that suit their voice. Also true for Eb, F, A and C.
As a fretted instrument player, no problem, capo it up, maybe play down a course depending on the key you’ve chosen.