Name of this Slow Air????

Re: Name of this Slow Air????

G’day Mattt

It is a song called "The lark in the clear air"

All the best

Brian x

Re: Name of this Slow Air????

Cheers Brian, have you any background info on it??

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Re: Name of this Slow Air????

[The intense pleasure which Ferguson received from
such music as he understood, had its highest gratifi-
cation when Herr Sjöden, a Swedish harpist, visited
Ireland in 1879 to add to his stores of national airs.
This accomplished gentleman often brought his harp
to Ferguson’s house, and enchanted him, and all other
listeners, with his performance. Lady Ferguson gave
Herr Sjöden a melody to which he begged Sir Samuel
to write words. He consented, and produced " The
Lark in clear air," words which rendered perfectly
the sentiment of the music for which they were com-
posed. Sir Samuel’s verses ran thus :

"Dear thoughts are in my mind, and my soul soars enchanted,
As I hear the sweet lark sing in the clear air of the day,
For a tender beaming smile to my hope has been granted,
And to-morrow she shall hear all my fond heart would say.

I shall tell her all my love, all my soul’s adoration,
And I think she will hear me, and will not say me Nay :
It is this that gives my soul all its joyous elation,
As I hear the sweet lark sing in the clear air of the day."

Herr Sjöden was enraptured with the melody, which,
it is believed, had not previously been noted down,
it having been imparted orally to Lady Ferguson by
an old Irish gentlewoman who called it "The Tailor’s
Son." It was sung at a concert given by the Swedish
harper before he left Dublin.

"The Lark in clear air," as taken down from Lady
Ferguson’s singing by her friend Lady Grainger-
Stewart of Edinburgh, has been published by Mr
A. P. Graves in his ’ Irish Song-Book,’ 1895, a volume
of the " New Irish Library " ; and Ferguson’s version
from the Irish of " Pastheen Finn " has been set to
music by A. A. Needham, and is a charming song.
" Cean Dubh Deelish " has been published by Messrs
Boosey and Co. ; while passages selected from " The
Forging of the Anchor " have, as already mentioned,
been set to music by Sir Julius Benedict, and performed
at the Norwich Festival.

On leaving Dublin for Croom Castle, Co. Limerick,
the country home of Robert Lyons, M.D., Herr Sjöden
wrote to Ferguson :

With my best thanks for your most kind letter and en-
closure, I beg much to apologise for my delaying the answer
so long. Shortly after my concert I went down to have some
days’ rest at this beautiful old country place, and could not
find time to call upon you and Lady Ferguson before I left.
I need not tell you about the complete success of "The
Tailor’s Son," or rather " The Lark in clear air." You know
about it before this, I am sure. I am indeed proud of the
result of my attempting to bring out the Irish airs on their
own instrument, and I am fully aware how much I owe the
success to yourself and Lady Ferguson. I have not yet been
able to find any Irish melody fully suitable to your beautiful
poetry, but I trust I shall be successful before long. When
back in Dublin, I will take an early opportunity of calling on
yourself and Lady Ferguson, and remain, dear Sir Samuel,
with my best compliments, your very sincerely and obliged,

ADOLF SJÖDEN. ]

Sir Samuel Ferguson in the Ireland of His Day (1896), Lady Catherine Ferguson. pp. 188-189

http://archive.org/details/sirsamuelferguso02fergiala

Re: Name of this Slow Air????

That’s Volume 2 of the book.

Re: Name of this Slow Air????

Info? Signature tune of Mo Cheol Thú for a good many years http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni47NwnsuLI

Instantly recognisable to anyone who ever tuned into the radio of a Sunday morning, up to a few short years ago..

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Re: Name of this Slow Air????

Dia dhuit a Wounded!

Thank you for such a spine shivering, tingling moment! From a child, even to out here in Tassie, for so many years I listened to dear Ciarán with his beautiful, rich and sonorous greeting “Bail ó Dhia oraibh agus mora dhaoibh/diobh ar maidin!” One of the hardest times was when I lived in the NE of England, a very poor reception. My last place of residence in Britain was on the island of Lundy, now that had a brilliant reception and I used to pray not to be rostered on duty on Sunday mornings! When I couldn’t get even an internet listening, now I am out here in dear Tassie, friends would send me CDs with recordings of the programme, in my opinion one of the best ever. Such diversity, music, poetry, writings…

Mattt, you might be interested to know too that I knew that song, and The Sally Gardens, before I ever started school. My mother had a lovely voice and in the morning she would sing as she put out the washing, and those were her favourite songs.

I also learned to whistle a blackbird’s song back to them that way; not only my mother, but my Granny (Fokhill, South Armagh) as well. Seriously, if you whistle back the song they sing they think there is a rival, and if you repeat whatever the melody, they will go through the whole of their repertoire to test you out.

All the best

Brian x

Re: Name of this Slow Air????

Ooops, Forkhill!

Brian x

Re: Name of this Slow Air????

Yes Brian, Ciarán certainly made a large contribution towards bridging the gap between the ‘diddly’ music, as it would have been viewed by many, and the general population. He played a great mix and kept people interested and tuned in. You kinda absorbed the music even if you weren’t particularly into it at the time.

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