Sheet music

Sheet music

I could do with some help. On John Wynne’s fantastic CD ‘With every breath’ there are some Gan Ainms. I know what that means, Googling won’t help. I’m looking for the sheet music of the waltz on track 7. I know I should learn it by heart and I even have the AMSD, but the problem is that I don’t understand what is theme and what is ornamentation.
So if someone could send a file to bartwijnen57@gmaildotcom I’d be delighted.

Be well,

Bart

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Re: Sheet music

https://thesession.org/recordings/964

It’s called "The Humours Of Flinn", and was composed by Tim O’Leary, brother of Christy O’Leary, who plays it on uilleann pipes the above album, Track 6, first tune. Unfortunately, no-one has posted the "dots" here, yet [ unless they’re here already, under another name, which is by no means unheard of ]. Honestly, the best thing you could do for yourself would be to learn it by ear. There is not a lot of ornamentation in it, I’d say, so it’s merely a matter of perseverance. Best of luck.
Clair Mann recorded it as well, I think.

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The more you listen, the sooner you’ll be able to isolate the melody. I agree with the above post.

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Who can tell me, how do you pronounce "Gan Ainm"?

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"No name." ;) "Gawn Ann-yim." Anymore I just search for ‘[word] pronounce’ on the intertubes. How did we figure this stuff out in the old days?

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Popular house name in my part of the world, many humorous types write it on their name plates as: "Gun Aim" thats not too far away. Other popular plays on gaelic house names are Dun Roamin & Dun Robbin

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i usually hear it is "guh nah num" in the states. in irish it would be a bit different, but the key is that there is an epenthetical between the n and m of ainm. this is an extra sound, similar to the sound between th and m in rhythm and the l and m in film for some dialects of english.

as an aside, my grandma’s cousin calls tunes without names "níl a fhios agam" tunes, which means "i don’t know." so, when asked what a tune is called, she’ll tell you that "the name of it is níl a fhios agam." normally, people around here don’t speak irish (mine is pretty limited, anyways), so the joke goes unnoticed. she’s a cheeky one!

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Thanks folks.
epenthetical. Now there’s a word. I take it that means an unspelled but sounded vowel sound. How do you pronounce it? :-)

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No David - that’s the second of his 2 tunes. The tune the OP was asking about is the one the "Boys Of The Lough" play before it.

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It didn’t sound like it when I played it, but my sight-reading is so poor I thought it was me….

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epenthetical: eh-pehn-thet-ih-kuhl. it means adding extra sounds to make a word easier to pronounce. the second syllable of rhythm, film (not US), and the b in thimble (orginally it was thymel).

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I listened to some recordings of The Humours of Flinn, and it’s a nice tune. Sort of an 18th century feel to parts of it. I do believe it will sound good on the harp, or flute and harp.

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It’s mainly in Ireland that they say "fil-um", the rest of us manage without the epenthetical. Not just those in the US.

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ah, i thought so. i couldn’t remember if people in britain said it or not. i do remember very distinctly my reaction when as a child i first heard visitors from ireland say fil-um! it was as interesting as my cousins from south africa who called a bathing suit a "costume."

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A bathing "suit" :-O :-/

;-)

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"It’s mainly in Ireland that they say "fil-um""

Also in N.E. England.

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The day after last year’s Rose of Tralee contest I heard a well known broadcaster on RTE (radio) speak of an interview he had with the winner. He said she looked like a filum star and that she was over wellumed with her sucess and was looking forward to a year at the helum.

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The Tralee Rose comes from a bulub.

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Also in N.E. England they call a bathing suit a "cossy". Except we go plodging, not bathing, which is what you do on Sundays.

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haha, cossy is great. now that it’s pointed out, bathing "suit" is an interesting term. also, we don’t go "bathing" in our suits, but "swimming." so, a term that has been catching on in the states is "swimming trunks." that’s only for men’s "cossies," though, ;-).

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