I can’t believe I’m doing this…

I can’t believe I’m doing this…

I have been annoyed when people post here for tune names but I can’t find it anywhere. Any ideas please?
X:1
T:?
M:9/8
R:Slip Jig
K:D
|:d2d2c2A2A|d2d2A2e2f|geg fdfe2c|d2d defd3:|
|:a2a2f2geA|f2f2d2e2f|geg fdf e2c|d2d defd2A:|
d2d2B2cBA|BGB BGB efg|aA gA fA edc|Bcd ecAd3:||

Posted by .

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

That’s not a slip jig. It’s Rørospols/Rörospolskan, a pols or polska (‘pols’ is the Norwegian name for a polska, I think) from the Norwegian/Swedish borders.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB2R1uR2hN4


It has been recorded by Karen Tweed and Ian Carr.

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

len - Your abc looks like someone has tried to convert it into a slip jig.

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

A "Rørospols" is a specific type of pols (like the springar, it is related to the Swedish polska) danced in the Røros area in Norway (and, I believe spilling over the border into the neighbouring part of Sweden). Andy Hornby’s 9/8 tune is probably him putting his own slant on it. They are invariably written in 3/4 in Norway. There is not just one tune for the dance.

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

Thank you. That is definitely the tune although I heard it played in the rhythm as I posted. More like http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ik75q4Uu-bE.

I shall now have to decide whether to play it "properly" or "swung".

Posted by .

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

Thanks Weejie. I suspected that, after finding YouTube clips of people dancing to several different tunes of the same type.

Whether it is written in 3/4 or 9/8 is immaterial, if it conveys the timing correctly (although I’m not sure that Andy Hornby’s transcription does) but, yes, I have certainly seen it written in 3/4, like a Swedish polska.

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

"Whether it is written in 3/4 or 9/8 is immaterial, if it conveys the timing correctly"

True, but neither actually do it with utmost precision. It’s conventional to write a pols, springar, springleik or polska in 3/4, however, and if you replace the triplets with two semiquavers followed by a quaver (or sometimes those notes in different order) it’s probably as close as you’ll get for a lot of them. Using 3/4 for slip and hop jigs can sometimes get closer to the way some play them - especially Coleman.

Re: I can’t believe I’m doing this…

there are 4 beats per measure here. It can’t be 3/4 or 9/8 it’s either 4/4 or 12/8.