Murray Flute

Murray Flute

Hello everyone,
A few years ago I bought a Sam Murray flute that I am very happy with, however when I bought it I had a long F nat, C nat and G sharp keys added. I find myself now wanting to add a B flat, E flat and short F nat keys. I am looking at two possibilities;
1. find someone who can add the additional keys to my existing flute
2. get a new fully chromatic flute
I have sent a couple of emails to Murray, but have not heard back from him. Has anyone ever added keys to an existing flute? If so, how did it turn out? How did you find someone to do the job? What criteria did you look at when deciding? Possibility of #2 is the best option, I feel, but I don’t want to wait to get a new flute. Thanks for any and all feedback.
Lowhistle

Re: Murray Flute

The Bb and Fnat keys should be fairly easy, but if they were block mounted and pin mounts need to be added to do the additional keys, it may not look very nice. Also, the keys may not match if Sam doesn’t do the work.
The feasibility of an Eb key may depend on how Sam constructed the end of the flute.

You might consider selling it and getting an eight-key flute instead. If you want all of these additional keys, at some point you’ll want the C# and Cnat. I would never give up my eight-key, I can tell you that.

Posted by .

Re: Murray Flute

Ailinn,
Thanks for the feedback. I have considered your points, and still at the crossroads.

I saw on your profile that you play two Casey Burns. I do too. I have an 8 key and a keyless. I love both. They have great volume in a session, and the low end on both is both rich & deep. My only complaint is the keyed flute is heavy, and I lose balance with it when I reach for the Bb key. Which CB’s do you have.
Lowhistle

Re: Murray Flute

My CB flutes are his early ones. One is made of mountain mahogany is a cut above what he currently markets as his Folk Flute. The second one (which I have offered for sale on this site) is made of blackwood, has a metal tuning slide and lined head and features decorative ivory rings (used - you can’t use new ivory anymore) at five places. It is comparable to his best keyless and is heavier because of the metal. I think the wood is heavier, too.

One of my vintage flutes was made in London in 1882. It is a superb instrument that is not only surprisingly light, but has a wonderful balance between the head-joint area, which contains the greatest concentration of metal, and the body of the flute. My second vintage flute is a Siccama http://www.mcgee-flutes.com/Siccama.html. Mine was made by William Hall & Sons of New York in the 1850s. It is heavier, but plays like no other. Loud and sonorous with more edge and punch than any other simple-system flute I’ve ever played. I bought it because I wanted more keyed holes due a loss of sensitivity in my fingers (peripheral neuropathy) that makes covering the tone holes less precise. It helps greatly with that problem, but I find that it is the best-kept secret for nirvana in Irish flute playing that there is.

The right flute for you is out there. If you make it a priority, you’ll find the right one.

Posted by .

Re: Murray Flute

Thank you Ailin. I agree, and my search has just begun.