And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

A couple of them have already at some sessions… The Jew’s Harp, for instance.

The stylophone might come in handy for Rolf yet to while away the lonely nights.

The contrabass balalaiki actually doesn’t seem much more outlandish than the double bass or mando bass but I wouldn’t expect to see it in the pub.

Some of the keyboard instruments look quite fascination while the Cymbol looks like a snooker table.

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

fascinating NOT fascination, of course.
🙂

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

io9 not responding. when we were young lads we went out on the Wren for the craic. five of us. one whistle - me , three bodhran players with two bodhrans and tom who sang " rudolf the red nose reindeer". we felt the setup wasn,t right. so we got pat the third bodhran player with no bodhran, who incidently did have his own stick to play a coconut shell. it made a kind of clippedy-clop sound and the natives thought it was gas craic. we were minted by it.

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

I did hear of a person who accompanied themselves on the shaky egg all through Lord Franklin. ( A sad ballad, for those not into the singing side of folk music.)
Jews harp are perfectly acceptable as folk instruments. I have a balalaika hanging on the wall, awaiting strings and a third string-peg. Mind you, we’ve already got TWO bodhrans on the wall, which might be taken as overkill.
I will admit to being intrigued by the Dactophone, which seems to embody aspects of musical saw, free reed instruments, and steel guitar.

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

That piano for playing in bed is fantastic! If they some day make a shakey egg like that, I won’t ever get up any more.

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

[*I did hear of a person who accompanied themselves on the shaky egg all through Lord Franklin. ( A sad ballad, for those not into the singing side of folk music.)*]

Just be thankful it wasn’t a coin and ashtray 🙂

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

Some of them look a little too unportable for your average session. I’ve actually played the Great Stalacpipe Organ, on a high school field trip (shortly after the formation of the caverns). Unlike session instruments, it never needs retuning. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7ys5fdrsAUM


The Stalacpipe isn’t really an organ — it’s a keyboard percussion instrument, like a really, really big celesta. For a session-sized weird instrument with a similar sound, there’s always the Hang. .http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ubnnsEUlYZg


You know, I’ve got a little portable Weber grill, and there’s a session tonight …
http://www.weber.com/grills/category/portable

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

We actually have a mando bass player at our session…it works well. He also plays mandolin when he’s feeling melodious. The mando bass, though, is a surprise the first time you see it.

Eric

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

@Tracie: A celesta is metal bars over tuned resonator boxes. A celesta sounds similar to a glockenspiel played with a softer mallet. A celesta is heard prominently in The Nutcracker ballet.
To me, the stalactites sound more like a marimba.
Whatever, this ‘organ’ is definitely a great idea and success.
vlnplyr

Re: And you thought that shakey egg was bad…

The hang and the bodhran sound good together — I enjoyed that, thanks Tracie.

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