Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

As advised in my last discussion posted here, with my shoulder malaise I have taken a break from the box and focused on my whistle. That is a really cheap double entendre that I don’t expect anyone to bite on, LOL.

Anyway. I travel alot by air domestically in the US and will be also flying to France this year also. I would like to take the whistle but as of late usually only carry on. With my box, I am used to having it bomb tested by TSA (and once had dismantlement threatened somewhere on the East coast) since I usually carry it on. With whistles, in previous overseas and domestic travel, the whistle was always in checked baggage (and several times inspected with TSA leaving a ‘love note’).

In the hugely over-the-top OCD security environment at airports these days, has anyone had trouble with security having a whistle in carry on luggage? Given most TSA screeners have no idea what an accordion is based on reaction to it in the security line, I can only imagine that the TSA line folks would think I was bringing on a tube to blow poison darts or some other highly unlikely but equally extreme imagination-wise possible item in my carry on.

Any experience with this?

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

Well, I suppose if you taped up all the holes you could blow darts. That would be pretty neat!

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

Its all theatre anyhow, often the guards know that by and large, so I have never had a problem with whistles in Europe, even the low D which ,technically, could be classed as potentially dangerous, [ever heard me play the lonesome boatman ๐Ÿ™‚] Its a bit like the police walking around with sub-machine guns in huge crowded airports, completely useless in reality, but looks like they mean business.

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

zippy, I carried on both a whistle and a flute on my last trip a few weeks ago. Not even a peep out of the TSA screeners. I was surprised to see people with guitars and fiddles as carry-ons on the very full planes I flew—I think the cabin staff let them stash them in the closet or whatever they call that thing up front. I fly Delta and Skywest, mostly; Alaska when I can get it. (free beer)

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

Alaska- Free beer. Not bad. Though I hat to ask what their extra checked bag fee is ๐Ÿ˜‰

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

Forgot. TSA screeners probably can recognize guitars. I have to wonder how many of them are aspiring musicians and song writers….. sorry. I know really bad taste, but from conversations from a few frisking me (I have a metal hip and set off every metal detector there is!) Not entirely untrue LOL

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

"Though I hate to ask what their extra checked bag fee is."

Who cares after a couple of cups of the Beer of the Day? ๐Ÿ˜€

My very favorite trip was when I was carrying a suitcase full of live bats back from South America. Great way to get through customs very quickly. But this was way before TSA and all of that…

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

I flew with the pipes and several high D whistles last month. That was an international flight from the UK to the US (and then back) and several domestic flights to various cities in the US. I had no bother with security.

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

After having to talk a TSA agent out of dismantling the Conn III last summer, I was worried what they might try to do with my Burke!

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

My partner flew in and out of Dublin with a bag of recorders recently including a bass, which is a reasonably hefty chunk of wood, no probs.
When flying with concertinas, at Birmingham I usually had to open my bag, but at Dublin they just asked if that was a "squeezebox" they could see on the screen, (including obligatory hand movements!)
Another time they asked whether what they could see on screen was a mandolin or a ukulele!

Re: Another ‘Flying with …{instrument} in a security environment"… question

Worry more about getting on early enough to put your instrument in an overhead bin. That is typically the biggest problem if you’re flying with anything larger than a flute or a whistle. Book early enough so you get your pick of seats, and use any frequent flier benefits you can to get a higher boarding priority, or if you have the money, purchase an upgrade to a higher boarding group. Checking in as soon as possible before the flight via the internet also helps. Be on time, and board immediately when your group is called. Don’t show up a minute before they shut the door and expect there to be any room for your instrument.